Deposit LDP

Ended on the 2 October 2020
If you are having trouble using the system, please try our help guide.

11 Policies

11.1 The following sections set out the Strategic Policies which form the framework for implementing and delivering the LDP. The format and structure reflects the core elements of sustainability and sustainable development, and the four well-being objectives or themes as identified within the Carmarthenshire Well-being Plan. This allows the Strategic Policies to cross reference to the strategic objectives set out in this document as well as the relevant Well-being goals. The strategic policies will therefore be set within the following themes:

  • Early Intervention - To make sure that people have the right help at the right time; as and when they need it
  • Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.
  • Healthy Habits - People have a good quality of life, and make healthy choices about their lives and environment.
  • Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change

11.2 It is recognised that there will be some overlap between the respective themes and their policies and as such they should be read in conjunction with one another. Each strategic policy is accompanied by an explanatory text.

Early Intervention - To make sure that people have the right help at the right time; as and when they need it

11.3 The implications for the well-being of individuals, their families and communities is recognised within the Plan through a focus on creating sustainable and inclusive places. This connected approach across all the themes allows long term solutions to ensure opportunities are available to maintain and enhance well-being.

11.4 It recognises that sustainable places are created from a balance of environmentally friendly, economically vibrant, and socially inclusive characteristics, that aim to benefit not only current inhabitants but also future generations.

11.5 Whilst it is recognised that there is an overlap between the themes and the assignment of policies the following having been identified under this theme:

  • Strategic Policy – SP 1: Strategic Growth
  • Strategic Policy – SP 2: Retail and Town Centres

11.6 The following policies seek to support the delivery of the Plan's strategic objectives, but also provide high level links and broad conformity with the Well-Being Goals.

Strategic Policy – SP 1: Strategic Growth

The LDP will provide for the future growth of a sustainable economy and housing requirement through the provision of:

  1. 10,160 new homes to meet the identified housing requirement of 8,835.
  2. A minimum of 77.93ha of allocated employment land.

The focus on regeneration and growth reflects the Council's core strategic ambitions with development distributed in a sustainable manner consistent with the spatial strategy and settlement framework.

11.7 This Revised LDP puts at its heart the creation of a balanced and cohesive County. It recognises that to deliver this the County's role as a strong and economic driver for growth both locally and regionally, places Carmarthenshire at the centre of a prosperous and sustainable Wales. The Plan's strategy for growth is formulated on the basis of sustainable development principles and in accordance with the goals and aspirations of the Well-being of Future Generations Act.

11.8 The strategic approach builds on the corporate emphasis on regeneration and the opportunities presented through the City Deal and other regeneration and investment opportunities, whilst also recognising the opportunities presented through the rural economy and diverse needs of communities across the County. The strategy therefore, has a recognition of the role employment plays in creating a prosperous County - with appropriate growth of housing with jobs and employment opportunities.

11.9 The Council, as part of its corporate policy, places regeneration as its number one objective. This is reflected through:

  • The Swansea Bay City Deal;
  • Transformations – Carmarthenshire Regeneration Plan; and
  • Moving Forward in Carmarthenshire: The Council's New Corporate Strategy 2018 – 2033.
  • Moving Rural Carmarthenshire Forward 2019

11.10 This focus on job creation and investment is based on Carmarthenshire's strategic location and its regional economic role. This strategy therefore seeks to recognise and reflect this, and the corporate objectives, in supporting and creating an attractive place for workers and investors.

11.11 By ensuring that our housing growth requirements are reflective of, and are in support of our economic ambitions, it allows for a co-ordinated and integrated approach to ensure that the shared role for economic growth is not in isolation of housing and vice a versa.

11.12 This approach requires the development of a balanced set of population and household projections that develop on the Welsh Government 2014-based projections but applies the ambitions of Carmarthenshire for its communities. This is to ensure there is a sufficient supply of homes to support the delivery of our economic ambitions and the needs of our communities.

11.13 The population and household trends, set through the Welsh Government's 2014-based projections, have been derived from demographic patterns during a recessionary period. They do not reflect the positive ambitions of the County and the Region over the plan period. Consideration must also be given to the rates of housing completions over the preceding years, which are far above the WG 2014 projection requirements. This strategy and its growth levels are intended to be ambitious but deliverable, and reflect wider objectives than this Revised LDP alone.

11.14 This Strategy will seek to distribute growth through a sustainable settlement hierarchy derived from the preferred spatial option. It recognises the diversity across the County and its rich environmental, biodiversity, natural and built landscape credentials. In delivering this strategy, it also recognises the role Carmarthenshire's rural areas as well as its urban areas contribute in delivering its vision for 'One Carmarthenshire'.

11.15 We will work closely with partners, infrastructure providers, developers, investors, and communities in delivering the Revised LDP and its strategy, policies and proposals.

SG1: Regeneration and Mixed Use Sites

Provision is made for mixed use allocations for the following sites:

Site Ref.

Location and Proposed Uses

PrC1/MU1

West Carmarthen, Carmarthen

Mix of uses consisting of residential (an allowance for 700 new homes within this plan period), employment, community facilities and amenity. A key deliverability indicator is the Carmarthen West Link Road which is now completed and open.

PrC1/MU2

Pibwrlwyd, Carmarthen

Includes a mix of uses reflecting its strategic location and contribution to Carmarthen. Uses include employment, commercial leisure, education associated with Coleg Sir Gar and residential (an allowance is made for 245 new homes).

PrC2/MU1

Former Old Castle Works, Llanelli

Mix of uses focused on the visitor economy, heritage and leisure. No residential allowance made.

PrC2/MU2

Trostre Gateway, Llanelli

Mix of uses reflecting its prominent location. Such uses include commercial and residential. An allowance is made for 35 new homes.

PrC3/MU1

Emlyn Brickworks, Penygroes

Provides for the regeneration of a previously developed site. A key deliverability indicator is the Cross Hands Economic Link Road which is under construction. Provision is made for the delivery of community focused development along with 177 new homes.

SeC4/MU1

Burry Port Waterfront

Mix of uses focused on appropriate retail provision along with commercial / tourism related uses. No residential allowance made.

SeC16/MU1

Beechwood, Llandeilo

Includes a mix of uses reflecting its strategic location and contribution to Llandeilo. Uses include a mix of appropriate employment, commercial and retail. Site forms part of a larger area which has been identified as a C2 flood risk zone. Applications will need to satisfy all requirements in this respect.

Table 3: Regeneration and Mixed Use

11.16 The above and their identified uses will, where appropriate, be further considered through SPG in the form of development briefs. These briefs will address the development of the sites in greater detail in a comprehensive and coordinated way ensuring that proposals are integrated in terms of the phasing of different elements and the provision of key deliverability drivers such as infrastructure provision.

SG2: Reserve Sites

Reserve Sites will be released for development in the event that the allocated sites (identified under policies HOM1, EME1 and SG1) fail to contribute as expected to the delivery of the Plan's strategy, or where there is a requirement to react to a material and significant contextual change – including but not exclusively related to changes in National Planning Policy.

The decision to release a site or remove an existing allocated site arising from non–delivery will be made by the Local Planning Authority in accordance with the monitoring framework. It must also be subject to a resolution arising from the content of the LDP Review Report.

Site Ref:

Description

SG2/1

Former Morlais Colliery, Llangennech

The site's potential strategic contribution incorporating employment and residential based proposals is within the context of Swansea Bay and Llanelli's position within the emerging National Development Framework.

SG2/2

Land adjacent to Silver Terrace, Burry Port

The site offers potential for the provision of employment floor space with a live / work element.

SG2/3

Cross Hands Employment Zone

A strategically positioned site adjacent to an established employment hub that can accommodate any future demand for large units in excess of 10,000 sqm. The site is close to the facilities within the Cross Hands and the strategic highway network.

SG2/4

Former Ennis Caravans, Cross Hands

Located in the Principal Centre in Cross Hands, this previously developed site presents opportunities for future residential development. Its non-inclusion as an allocation reflects doubts over immediate delivery, however its potential contribution will be monitored and reviewed with its future contribution considered in line with this policy.

SG2/5

Nant y Caws Waste Management Site

A strategically positioned site already utilised for the sustainable management of waste. It offers the future opportunity to potentially harness energy from waste and also renewable energy, both of which could help to create a district energy scheme. Future opportunities could be set out through the development of a masterplan for the site.

Table 4: Reserve Sites

Proposals for development on Reserve Sites, including as part of mixed use development must:

  1. be brought forward in line with an agreed masterplan, in accordance with the provisions of this Plan and cover the whole of the Reserve Site.
  2. the site does not lead to over provision which would jeapordise the delivery of allocated and deliverable sites.

11.17 Specific evidence should be provided that clearly shows, to the satisfaction of the local planning authority, that development proposals accord with the following LDP policies:

  • PSD1: Sustainability and High Quality Design
  • PSD2: Masterplanning Principles – Creating Sustainable Neighbourhoods
  • PSD3: Green Infrastructure Network
  • PSD4: Green Infrastructure – Trees, Woodlands and Hedgerows
  • TRA1: Transport and Highways Infrastructural Improvements
  • TRA2: Active Travel
  • SP8: Infrastructure
  • INF1: Planning Obligations

11.18 The need for reserve sites will be closely monitored through take-up of allocated sites as part of the monitoring framework of this Plan and reported through the Annual Monitoring Report arrangements. In the event that the allocated sites (identified under policies HOM1, EME1 and EMP5) fail to contribute as expected to the delivery of the Plan's strategy, then the decision to utilise a Reserve Site will be subject to a resolution by County Council at the time of reporting of the LDP Review Report.

11.19 The need to identify an alternative range of reserve sites is necessary to ensure that the LDP strategy provides sufficient flexibility in the event that development on allocated and existing commitments stalls. Reference is also made to the emerging NDF and potential for a Strategic Development Plan (SDP).

11.20 The purpose of this Policy is to establish the principle of mixed use development (inc. housing) on these sites and stimulate the market to resolve issues and bring forward the sites when necessary.

SG3: Pembrey Peninsula

High quality proposals that contribute towards unlocking the potential of the Peninsula as a destination to stay, play, and work will be supported where they respect the area's role, function and sense of place.

Proposals should build upon established uses and features within this expansive coastal location in recognition of the area's natural and built historic qualities.

11.21 The Peninsula consists of some 1,780 hectares along the A484 and London to Fishguard Rail Line transportation corridor. It extends from the outskirts of the historic town of Kidwelly on the mouth of the Gwendraeth Fach to its north. The east is bordered by the A484, London to Fishguard Rail line and the Pinged flats. The south / south-east is bordered by the Millennium Coastal Park.

11.22 Whilst the Peninsula is well placed to attract an integrated and strategic package of regeneration and investment, it is also an ecologically sensitive area that is subject to a range of developmental considerations.

11.23 The sense of place is framed by a contrasting range of uses and features. These include Pembrey Country Park to the south, with the motor racing circuit and airport to the north.

11.24 The area continues to function as a key resource for residents, visitors and biodiversity alike. In this regard, development proposals that would unduly compromise the ongoing resource for our future generations would not be supported.

11.25 The Council will prepare Supplementary Planning Guidance to provide further elaboration upon the provisions of this policy and the future opportunities within the Peninsula.


Strategic Policy – SP 2: Retail and Town Centres

Proposals for retail development will be considered in accordance with the following retail hierarchy and the provisions below:

Sub Regional - High Order Town Centre

Carmarthen

Mid Order Town Centres

Llanelli

Ammanford

Lower Order Town Centres

Burry Port

Llandeilo

Llandovery

Newcastle Emlyn

St. Clears

Whitland

  1. Proposals in respect of Carmarthen Town Centre will be permitted where they accord with the provisions of Policy RTC1 (and the following where appropriate).
  2. The vitality, viability and attractiveness of our retail centres will be maintained and enhanced along with the range of their existing uses, including local markets. Proposals which widen the range of use and encourage convenient and accessible shopping, service, public service and employment/business opportunities will be supported.
  3. Proposals for convenience stores of an appropriate scale will be permitted in the designated Mid and Lower Order Town Centres where they are located within or immediately adjoining the defined town centre boundary and are subject to:
    1. The submission of an impact assessment to demonstrate that the proposal would not have an adverse effect on the vitality and viability of the existing retail centre, and
    2. Evidence of a sequential test having been applied to the site selection.
  4. Proposals will be supported which, where applicable:
    1. Provide opportunities for independent retail and commercial sectors;
    2. Support and do not undermine the continued retail function of the mid order town centres;
    3. Promote and diversify the education, leisure, cultural facilities and the night-time economy;
    4. Provide for the creation of high quality public spaces and environmental improvements including the preservation and enhancement of the distinctive local character of the historic built and natural environment, and a commitment to high quality design;
    5. Improve places for pedestrians, cyclists and disabled including enhancing public transport, accessibility, car parking, signage and the street scene;
    6. Protect, enhance and integrate with the green infrastructure network.

Outside of the above town centres the following forms of retail and shopping provision will be permitted:

  1. New non-food retail warehouse units (including garden centres, car showrooms and drive-thru coffee shops) and appropriate leisure facilities on designated retail parks where supported by:
    1. an impact assessment demonstrating that the proposal would not cause harm to established town centres;
    2. evidence that a sequential approach has been undertaken indicating that there is no suitable available and sustainable sites in locations within or immediately adjoining defined town centres;
    3. evidence of quantitative, qualitative and/or other relevant need for the development;
    4. evidence of the site's accessibility to sustainable modes of transport.
  2. Specialist retail and trade centre proposals within employment sites;
  3. Proposals for small local convenience shopping facilities in rural and urban areas within the development limits where they are of a scale appropriate to that settlement. Rural retail proposals will be considered in accordance with policy RTC3.

11.26 The policy seeks to recognise the general pattern of provision in a traditional hierarchy of centres ranging from the small localised provision through to the larger centres providing a greater choice over a wider product range. The larger centres also act as locations for related activities in the leisure and entertainment sphere including cinemas and restaurants etc. and for commercial office uses including solicitors, accountants and estate agents etc.

11.27 In general, local provision represents goods and services required on a day-to-day basis (convenience items) and for which residents may make short journeys frequently, whilst the larger centres not only provide such facilities but also more specialised items (comparison goods) sought less frequently and for which shoppers are prepared to travel further. Traditionally, shopping provision has evolved in a hierarchy of centres with overlapping catchments reflecting their size and importance.

11.28 It is this pattern of retail provision which characterises Carmarthenshire with the traditionally larger centres of Carmarthen, Llanelli and Ammanford historically serving larger catchment areas with a broad and specialised range of goods and items.

11.29 In defining a retail hierarchy, regard has been given to the respective roles and functions of the larger towns and small villages. In this respect it is acknowledged that whilst the range of shopping provision throughout the hierarchy plays an essential role, the Principal Centres of Carmarthen, Llanelli and Ammanford, provide the focus of town centre based retail activity. However, it is also recognised that each of these centres perform different roles within the context of their communities and wider geographical functions. In this respect, Carmarthen town centre fulfils a sub-regional function whilst Ammanford and Llanelli town centres are more focused on serving its surrounding communities.

11.30 It is acknowledged however, that despite their inherent differences each centre has, and is experiencing different challenges as the future role of the high street changes in response to different retail pressures. In this respect TAN4 makes provision for the application of appropriate policies to those centres based on their characteristics and sustainability. In responding to this locally-driven approach, variations in respect of what constitutes a higher and lower order centre allows for a more focused but flexible response based on their different scales and characteristics. It also enables the Plan to respond to changing economic circumstances and to seek to address variations in retail activity.

11.31 In characterising higher order retail and commercial centres, TAN4 identifies them as being accessible to a large number of people, and the scale and diverse range of uses present will reflect the needs of a population – this is normally greater than the local community. With such centres typically characterised by combinations of shops, offices, financial & professional services, food and drink establishments, hotels, education facilities, entertainment and leisure, non-residential institutions as well as residential (TAN4 para. 4.2).

11.32 Alternatively, lower order centres are characterised by smaller scale provision and fewer uses, with the intention of primarily serving the needs of a local community. These would typically include shops, financial and professional services, food and drink, and non-residential institutions of an appropriate scale, but depending on the centre may include other uses (TAN4 para 4.3).

11.33 In relation to the previous status of both Llanelli and Ammanford it is clear that their high streets have experienced challenging times with both retaining important, albeit slightly diminished retail roles. In further considering where their future along with that of Carmarthen may lie in terms of the retail hierarchy, it is important to consider how they will develop and their future role as well as how the Plan seeks to respond to a potential decline in that centre.

11.34 Whilst not immune to those challenges, Carmarthen has retained a sub-regional role and has a strong national presence on its high street as well as a variety of local stores. The centre continues to serve a range of needs for the population beyond its local community. In this respect it is readily characterised as a higher order retail centre by the provisions above.

11.35 In relation to both Llanelli and Ammanford, the occupation of the town centre by national operators remains at a reduced level and with the town centre offer increasingly reflective of one that serves a more localised community. This coupled with the challenges around turnover of retail units, and issues around vacancy rates, requires a re-evaluation of their previous high order centre status. Both Ammanford and the Llanelli town centres have attracted significant interventions in regeneration terms, with Task Forces established to face some of the challenges prevalent in both centres, with the latter also being subject to a focused Local Development Order.

11.36 The changing dynamics within the retail offer for both these centres brings added focus on the need for the hierarchy and the retail policies to provide a locally driven response to their issues. Consequently, the hierarchy has been established with appropriate policies to allow for different types of retail and commercial context between the Plan's three Principal Centres. These will allow a more flexible approach in relation to how these centres develop in the future.

11.37 The smaller towns or market towns of, for example, Newcastle Emlyn, Llandeilo and St Clears with their smaller local catchments typically meet local needs with some specialised provision. This is supplemented by often larger villages which may provide essential items required to meet day to day needs.

11.38 Similarly to many areas, out-of-centre shopping with large retail warehouses (including bulky goods) has participated in changing retail trends and have in certain instances challenged the vibrancy and role of existing and established town centres. Whilst these challenges are recognised it is also noted that they can present opportunities in broadening the retail offer.

11.39 The retail strategy of the LDP reflects the social, economic and environmental principles of sustainable development which underpins the Plan. It also seeks to reflect the changing nature of retailing and the need for traditional town centres to adapt to such changes. The Strategy seeks to:

  1. Protect and enhance the roles of the retail centres to ensure their continued attractiveness as town centres, shopping, commercial and leisure destinations and to protect local retail provision established in the county as well as the local businesses behind them. The challenge will be to maintain their competitiveness and market share whilst understanding the needs of each centre and their respective role and contribution in retail terms;
  2. Locate and guide retail provision to sustainable locations which are accessible by public transport or active travel routes in order to minise the need for travel;
  3. In smaller lower order centres, ensure that local communities have reasonable access to a satisfactory range of high street facilities and services, particularly convenience goods (food and other essential day-to-day requirements); and,
  4. In the larger villages, maintain the viability of the village shop and other local facilities.

11.40 The Updated Retail Study (2015) for Carmarthenshire examined retail issues across the County and assessed the capacity for growth across the retail sectors. It was prepared to provide evidence in respect of policy formulation and to inform the identification of a retail hierarchy for the Plan area to guide decision making, as required by PPW. Consequently, the "town centres first" principle in tandem with a sequential approach to the selection of sites will be used to promote town centres as the principal locations for new retail, office, leisure and health facilities. In doing so, the aim will be to create more reasons why people should visit such centres with a resultant increase in social and economic activity thereby retaining its viability.

11.41 Allowing for the variations in the hierarchy, retail will be expected to continue as the principal activity in all three sub-regional and mid order centres. However, this is only one of the factors which contribute to their wellbeing. Retail policies cannot be divorced from the broader functions of the larger towns as centres for other services and facilities, including food and drink establishments (cafes, restaurants, public houses, etc.) and commercial leisure developments. This diversity of uses in town centres assists in promoting their continued viability and - particularly with regard to leisure and residential uses - contributes to the vitality of a successful evening economy and their role as living town centres.

11.42 Provision outside the sub-regional and mid order centres, including local village shops, make an important contribution to the retail function of Carmarthenshire. In this respect, those centres fulfilling a convenience retail need and smaller scale day to day shopping need provide diversity consistent with the objectives of sustaining communities and minimising the need to travel. These settlements and their retail offer can complement the established retail function of those higher up the hierarchy as well as contributing to the implementation of the Plan's Strategy. Proposals for convenience retail outside of the town centre boundary in such centres will be required to appropriately evidence the retail need so as to ensure the retailing activities within the town centres are not undermined.

11.43 The LDP policies also seek to ensure that retail, non-retail and leisure developments are located in the most appropriate locations. Generally, the most appropriate locations are within existing centres, which are accessible by a range of means of transport, and can promote linked trips to other uses in the centre. Developers will be required to search thoroughly for sites within centres before considering less centrally located ones.

11.44 Further guidance in respect of national planning policy is contained within PPW: Edition 10 - Chapter 4 Active and Social Places and within TAN4 Retailing and Town Centres.

11.45 PPW Ed. 10 gives specific recognition for the role local and village shops and public houses play within communities and the potential impact of their loss. Consequently, reference should therefore be made to policy RTC3 below.

11.46 Proposals for retail activity within rural Carmarthenshire should be considered in accordance with policy RTC3.

11.47 Town Centres are not always capable of accommodating particular types of retailing such as bulky goods owing to the requirements for large sites and buildings and the implications for traffic generation and parking. As a consequence, such outlets have been permitted in out-of-centre locations in accordance with national guidance, either in the form of individual units or collectively on retail parks. In view of the increasing pressures for such outlets, the Revised LDP seeks to address the issue of retail parks and defines the criteria to be applied to prospective developments. In this respect, the policies relating to retail parks promote the co-location of appropriate retail facilities and reducing the proliferation of separate retail destinations within the County. Such a strategy is more sustainable in transport terms, and will allow retail businesses to benefit from the collective attraction of co-location.

11.48 The Plan recognises that certain types of retail and leisure facilities cannot be suitably accommodated within town centre locations and that Regional Centres (Retail Parks) can play a role in accommodating this need. However, the scale, type and location of retail development should not undermine the attractiveness, vitality and viability of existing town centres.

11.49 A sequential approach should be adopted which means that first preference should be for existing town centre locations as listed in the retail hierarchy, and then for sites immediately adjoining town centres. If there are no suitable available sites in these locations, only then may development in other non-town centre and edge of centre locations including but not exclusive to the following existing regional centres (retail parks) will be considered:

11.50 Regional Centres: (Retail Parks)

  • Stephens Way and Parc Pensarn, Carmarthen;
  • Parc Trostre and Parc Pemberton, Llanelli;
  • Cross Hands Retail Park.
  • Maes Yr Eithin Retail Park, Cross Hands

11.51 Carmarthen and Llanelli have significant retail provision on retail parks located outside of the respective town centres. The principal retail parks in Carmarthen are at Stephens Way and Parc Pensarn which provide for a range of bulky and non-bulky goods.

11.52 Llanelli is served by Parc Trostre and Parc Pemberton with the former exhibiting a large number of units predominantly occupied by 'high street multiples'. Parc Pemberton is by contrast mainly focused around DIY, electrical and furniture reflecting a bulky goods restriction which does not apply to Parc Trostre.

11.53 The retail park at Cross Hands, whilst smaller in scale to those in Carmarthen and Llanelli, provides an important complementary role to the town centre provisions in Ammanford through its predominantly DIY, electrical and furniture offer.

11.54 The applicant will be required to submit an impact assessment to demonstrate that the proposal would not cause harm to established town centres. The assessment should also take into consideration the cumulative effects of recently completed development and outstanding planning permissions. The assessment should outline the type of retail offer proposed by the applicant and how this could impact upon competing retail provision which exists in the nearby town centres and whether it could result in the diversion of trade from the town centre.

11.55 New proposals will be required to clearly demonstrate that there is additional need for new retail warehouse units offering the range of goods anticipated.

RTC1: Carmarthen Town Centre

Proposals will be permitted where they maintain and enhance the vitality, viability and attractiveness of Carmarthen Town Centre.

Retail and applicable leisure uses, which maintain, enhance and diversify the town centre should be sequentially located within the Primary Town Centre Retail Area. Proposals for the development of retail frontage for non-retail uses within the Primary Town Centre Retail Area will only be permitted where it would contribute to maintaining and enhancing the vitality and viability of the area's retail function.

Proposals for retail and other town centre uses, which support its growth as a sub-regional retail town centre (including leisure, civic, cultural, education, business, health and residential) within the Secondary Town Centre Retail Area will be permitted where they would not:

  1. undermine the retail function of the centre, or have a detrimental effect upon the vitality or viability of the area; and
  2. create a level of non-retail ground floor frontage detrimental to the retail character and function of the area.

Regard should be had to the provisions of Strategic Policy SP2.

11.56 The revised LDP seeks to consolidate the role of Carmarthen as a sub-regional retail centre serving wider catchment areas for comparison retail. In this regard, it has a history as a well performing town centre with a strong retail offer. In this respect the policy seeks to safeguard its retail role whilst reflecting the changing nature of the high street and shopping habits.

11.57 A large market town, Carmarthen serves a wide range of communities both locally and within the broader region offering a mix of national high street names with smaller local and niche retail stores. Its retail and commercial offer has been enhanced in recent years through the development of St Catherine's Walk which is anchored by a Debenhams store and the multi-screen cinema, which adds to the centre's commercial and leisure offer and visitor appeal.

11.58 The policy, through the designation of Primary and Secondary town centre retail areas recognises that the important role of retail (A1) uses and the proportion within these areas.

11.59 It also recognises the benefits of a diversity of uses in town centres. However, a high prevalence of non-retail provision, particularly within the Primary Town Centre Retail Area, can be to the detriment of the area resulting in a reduced retail offer and the creation of "dead frontages" removing the interest for passing shoppers and reducing footfall. The policy seeks to ensure that the retail frontage, retains the attractiveness of the current diversity of uses.

11.60 In this respect, the main function of the Primary Town Centre Retail Area is retail (A1) with the Secondary Town Centre Retail Area representing the principal areas where other town centre services such as leisure, restaurants, financial services etc., which add interest and vitality, should be located.

11.61 Proposals involving the change of use and / or re-development of a ground floor frontage to residential use are not considered compatible with a 'town centre' location.

11.62 Areas defined as Secondary Town Centre Retail Area generally relate to those streets which are adjacent to, and/or link areas of Primary Town Centre Retail Area. In setting out the considerations in respect of non-retail proposals, the policy allows and encourages a diversity of uses in town centres beyond the Primary Town Centre Retail Area. The Revised LDP seeks to strike a balance between protecting the overall retail character of the town centre and providing a diversity of uses. In so doing, it is recognised that its character and identity is augmented by the presence of independent traders operating from the more peripheral streets and in locations and that these can be susceptible to competition. It is however recognised that diversification enables other beneficial, economic uses to complement the retailing presence and to maintain the physical fabric and appearance of streets and buildings which may otherwise be susceptible to decline.

11.63 The potential for appropriate diversification within the town centre retail area enabled through this policy, provides for the contribution these areas can make in increasing its overall attractiveness. The introduction of complementary retail, leisure and business offers can contribute to a broader appeal, nevertheless, the policy recognises the importance of a strong retail element and seeks to maintain the vitality and viability of the towns retail offer.

RTC2: Protection of Local Shops and Facilities

Proposals which would result in the loss of a local shop or service (including Public Houses) outside of the Town Centres identified within Strategic Policy SP2 will only be permitted where:

  1. Its loss would not be detrimental to the social and economic fabric of the community;
  2. There is another shop or service of a similar compatible use available for customers within the settlement or within a convenient walking distance.

In the absence of an alternative provision, proposals resulting in the loss of the local shop, or service will only be permitted where all reasonable attempts have been made to market the business for sale or let over a 12 month period and have failed.

11.64 In seeking to define and create sustainable communities the Plan identifies and recognises the contribution of local services. These include such facilities as shops, post offices, public houses, petrol filling stations, which will contribute to the future viability of settlements and communities, both in terms of providing a service but also in offering 'meeting places' where community interaction can occur and community spirit can be enhanced. Moreover, the LDP supports local retail provision and the economic benefits which they present within the communities.

11.65 The Council also recognises the importance of community facilities and services where there is a strong local dependence on them. Such services are vital to the economic wellbeing of the communities and also promote social inclusion, particularly amongst the less mobile members of a community.

11.66 It is acknowledged that the rural settlements are the most vulnerable to the loss of such facilities. Factors such as demand and the high value of residential land in the rural areas, often results in pressure from property owners to change the use or redevelop such facilities for residential purposes, even where the business is thriving. The income from a shop or other activity may be less than can be gained from an alternative development. This policy seeks to moderate pressures for change by ensuring that unless there are reasonable alternative facilities, and if the shop or facility is viable at appropriate rent levels, then its loss will not be allowed.

11.67 Whilst the policy seeks to protect against the loss of facilities, provision is made for those circumstances where it can be demonstrated that such facilities are no longer needed or are not viable.

11.68 A walkable distance for the purposes of this policy is as contained within the Manual for Streets: Department for Transport/Communities and Local Government/WAG – 2007[1]. This identifies that 'Walkable neighbourhoods are typically characterised by having a range of facilities within 10 minutes (up to about 800m) walking distance of residential areas which residents may access comfortably on foot'.

11.69 Marketing of premises for the purposes of this policy can be defined as advertised within an appropriate industry publication or where appropriate, through local estate agents over a reasonable period and for a reasonable price.

RTC3: Retail in Rural Areas

Proposals for ancillary small scale shops or extensions to existing shops outside development boundaries will be permitted where they conform to the following:

  1. It represents a subordinate element of an existing business activity on the site;
  2. It will not result in significant harm to the viability of nearby village shops;
  3. It would not have an adverse impact on the character, setting and appearance of the area and the surrounding landscape and where appropriate, townscape;
  4. It is accessible via sustainable means of transport;
  5. Access and parking arrangements are satisfactory and the development will not significantly harm highway safety.

11.70 Proposals for new shops in rural areas which are ancillary to other uses can often provide an important contribution to the rural economy. Such provision, be they in the form of farm shops (that will help to meet the demand for fresh produce), craft shops and shops linked to petrol stations, not only service a local requirement but are also a source of employment.

11.71 Whilst such provision has the potential to provide a service to rural communities it must be reflective of its rural context. In this regard, the shop should be related to and subordinate to an existing business.

11.72 It is recognised that shops in rural areas can create additional employment opportunities and aid rural economic diversification as well as providing a service to local communities.

11.73 The Council may seek to use planning conditions to limit the range of goods sold or restrict the amount of floor space where appropriate, to prevent any significant harm to nearby retail activity. Regard will also be had to the potential for the proposal to operate on a seasonal basis where it is not desirable for it to operate throughout the year.

11.74 Shops ancillary to other uses, such as farm shops that will help to meet the demand for fresh produce, craft shops and shops linked to petrol stations, can as identified play an important role in rural areas by providing new sources of jobs and services. However, in assessing such proposals the regard will be had to the potential impact on nearby retail and commercial centres and notably village shops[2]. Consideration will be given to the use of planning conditions to limit the range of goods sold or restrict the amount of floor space if this allows the development to proceed.


Prosperous People and Places - To maximise opportunities for people and places in both urban and rural parts of our county.

11.75 Socio-economic issues including poverty and deprivation facing both rural and urban parts of our County is recognised within this Plan's "One Carmarthenshire" vision. To this end, this Plan seeks to tackle these issues by maximising opportunities for everyone to maintain or increase their prosperity and sense of wellbeing.

11.76 These opportunities include the provision for new homes including affordable homes and jobs, as well as steering new investment and infrastructural priorities, whilst also respecting the County's social fabric, including the Welsh language, culture and its sense of place.

11.77 Whilst it is recognised that there is an overlap between the themes and the assignment of policies the following having been identified under this theme:

  • Strategic Policy – SP 3: Providing New Homes
  • Strategic Policy – SP 4: Affordable Homes
  • Strategic Policy – SP 5: Strategic Sites
  • Strategic Policy – SP 6: Employment and the Economy
  • Strategic Policy – SP 7: Welsh Language and Culture
  • Strategic Policy – SP 8: Infrastructure
  • Strategic Policy – SP 9: Gypsy and Traveller Provision
  • Strategic Policy – SP 10: The Visitor Economy
  • Strategic Policy – SP 11: Placemaking, Sustainability and High Quality Design

11.78 The following policies seek to support the delivery of the Plan's strategic objectives, but also provide high level links and broad conformity with the Well-Being Goals.


Strategic Policy – SP 3: A Sustainable Approach to Providing New Homes

In order to ensure the overall housing requirement of 8,835 homes for the plan period is met, provision is made for 10,160 new homes in accordance with the settlement framework in order to promote the creation and enhancement of sustainable communities.

The sustainable approach to the provision of new homes reflects the following principles:

  1. Creating places through the identified settlement framework reflecting the character and context of that cluster or settlement;
  2. Allocating sites for new homes in established settlements;
  3. Supporting windfall residential development on appropriate sites within settlements, with a focus on the re-use of previously developed land; and
  4. Provision of appropriate affordable housing opportunities to meet identified local need.

Proposals within the defined development limits will be permitted subject to the policies and proposals of this Plan. There will be a presumption against inappropriate housing development outside of the defined limits except where they are subject to the policies of this Plan.

11.79 It is an aim of the Plan to facilitate the delivery of the required number and range of quality new homes, which will meet the identified housing needs and promote cohesive communities that are attractive, safe, well connected, and provide accessibility to cultural and leisure facilities, community services and employment opportunities.

11.80 The Plan's Strategy and its sustainable approach to the provision of new homes has been formulated on the basis of sustainable development principles. This accords with the goals and aspirations of the Well-Being and Future Generations Act and national planning policy[3]. It is focussed on meeting housing needs across the County's diverse communities in a way which is sustainable, respects the environmental qualities of the County and its cultural and Welsh language characteristics.

11.81 The LDP seeks to promote a sense of place through the promotion of cohesive communities that are attractive, safe, well connected, and offer a range of opportunities for accessing services noting the rural character of parts of the County.

11.82 The housing requirement figure for the County is based on the Population Growth (PG) – 10yr projection scenario highlighted within the 2019 Edge Analytics report[4]. This scenario projects a housing requirement which would support the economic ambitions of the County through supporting job creation, and seeks to play its part in re-addressing the imbalance of an ageing population within Carmarthenshire. The rationale for using this preferred growth option also considers the past build rates within the County over the previous 12 years, and allows an ambitious, yet sound basis on which to deliver the Council's overall strategic aims.

11.83 This Plan factors in a number of housing supply components to meet this housing need, together with a flexibility (uplift) to ensure that the overall aim of the strategic policy to provide new homes is met. The housing supply is made up of the following components:

  • Housing Allocations (5+ homes)
    • Land bank Commitments
    • Completed Dwellings
  • Windfall Allowance
    • Small Site Component (less than 5 homes)
    • Windfall Component (5+ Homes)
  • Flexibility (+15%)

Housing Allocations

11.84 The largest component of housing supply is sites allocated for residential development. Housing allocations will be identified within the specific housing policies, or included as part of mixed use allocations.

11.85 The specific policies will consider the developments which have been commenced or committed since the base date of the revised LDP, and they will be continually monitored through the work undertaken as part of the Joint Housing Land Availability (JHLA) Study and the Housing Trajectory (Appendix 7).

Windfall

11.86 The windfall allowance is made up of the following factors:

  1. Potential contributions of sites of less than five dwellings (small sites) within the defined settlements.
  2. Windfall allowance through sites of five or more dwellings which have traditionally made an important contribution to housing delivery within Carmarthenshire.

11.87 Windfall developments will be considered on their individual merits and against the policies and proposals of this Plan. It is recognised that it is not always practicable or appropriate to allocate every site for development within the Principal Centres and Service Centres. Indeed within smaller settlements there will often be sites suitable for development which are not identified as allocations – with their contribution to housing land supply identified through the windfall allowance.


HOM1: Housing Allocations

Land is allocated for residential development on the following sites.

Site Ref

Site Name

Total Units in Plan Period

Total Affordable Units in Plan period

Delivery Timescale

Year 1-5

Year 6-10

Year 11-15

Units beyond the Plan Period

Cluster 1

Carmarthen

PrC1/h1

Former Health Authority Buildings, Penlan Road

8

0

1-5

PrC1/h2

Springfield Road

29

8.7

1-5

PrC1/h3

113 Priory Street

37

37

1-5

PrC1/h4

Land off Parc y Delyn

35

5.95

11-15

PrC1/h5

East of Devereaux Drive

10

1

6-10

PrC1/h6

Dolgwili Road

26

4.4

6-10

PrC1/h7

Penybont Farm, Llysonnen Road

9

0

11-15

PrC1/h8

Llansteffan Road

50

8.5

6-10

PrC1/h9

Mounthill

5

0

1-5

PrC1/h10

Brynhyfryd

20

3.4

1-5

6-10

PrC1/h11

Rhiw Babell extension

12

0

1-5

PrC1/h12

Castell Pigyn Road, Abergwili

35

5.95

6-10

PrC1/h13

Land south of Pant Glas, Bronwydd Road

13

4

6-10

11-15

PrC1/h14

Bronwydd Road (south)

23

6.9

1-5

PrC1/MU1

West Carmarthen

700

84

6-10

11-15

PrC1/MU2

Pibwrlwyd

249

49

11-15

Pontyates / Meinciau / Ponthenri

SeC1/h1

Lime Grove

19

3.8

1-5

6-10

SeC1/h2

Land to the rear of Brynderi

7

2

1-5

6-10

SeC1/h3

Land adjoining Tabernacle Chapel

11

1

1-5

6-10

SeC1/h4

Cae Canfas, Heol Llanelli

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

11-15

SeC1/h5

Land at 8 Heol Llanelli

6

0

1-5

Ferryside

SeC2/h1

Caradog Court

12

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

SeC2/h2

Land to the rear of Parc y Ffynnon

12

1.2

6-10

Cynwyl Elfed

SuV1/h1

Adjacent Fron Heulog

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

SuV1/h2

Land adj. Lleine

13

4

1-5

6-10

Llansteffan

SuV3/h1

Land to the rear of Maesgriffith

19

5

1-5

6-10

Bronwydd

SuV4/h1

Land at Troed Rhiw farm

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Cwmffrwd

SuV5/h1

Land at Maesglasnant

20

4

1-5

Llangain

SuV8/h1

South of Dol y Dderwen

36

11

6-10

Peniel

SuV10/h1

South of Pentre

10

0

1-5

SuV10/h2

Aberdeuddwr / Pantyfedwen

38

6.5

6-10

Alltwallis

SuV11/h1

Land at Alltwalis School

12

1.2

1-5

Llanpumsaint

SuV12/h1

Adj. Gwyn Villa

20

3.4

1-5

6-10

Rhydargaeau

SuV14/h1

Cefn Farm

33

5.6

1-5

6-10

Llanarthne

SuV15/h1

Llanarthne School

10

2

1-5

Capel Dewi

SuV16/h1

Llwynddewi Road

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

Nantagaredig

SuV17/h1

Rear of former joinery, Station Road

30

5.1

6-10

Pontargothi

SuV18/h1

Land adj. Cresselly Arms

15

3

1-5

Llanddarog

SuV19/h1

Land Opp. Village Hall

16

3.2

1-5

SuV19/h2

Land adj. and the r/o Haulfan

10

1

6-10

11-15

Porthyrhyd

SuV20/h1

Land adjacent to Llwynhenry Farm

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Total for Cluster

1646

Cluster 2

Llanelli

PrC2/h1

Beech Grove, Pwll

10

1

6-10

PrC2/h2

Former Laboratory Pen y Fai Lane

10

2

1-5

PrC2/h3

Parc y Strade, Llanelli West

94

0

1-5

PrC2/h4

North Dock (inc former Pontrilas)

210

42

6-10

11-15

PrC2/h5

The Avenue, Morfa

35

5.95

6-10

11-15

PrC2/h6

107 Station Road

7

0

1-5

PrC2/h7

13-15 Station Road

9

0

1-5

PrC2/h8

2-4 Coleshill Terrace

9

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

PrC2/h9

3-5 Goring Road

8

8

1-5

PrC2/h10

Land adjacent The Dell, Furnace

13

1.3

1-5

6-10

PrC2/h11

Brynmefys , Furnace

54

10.8

1-5

6-10

PrC2/h12

Llys yr Hen Felin, Town Centre

27

27

1-5

PrC2/h13

Land off Frondeg Terrace

29

29

1-5

PrC2/h14

Rear of 22c,22d and 22e Llwynhendy Road

6

0

1-5

PrC2/h15

Maesarddafen Road /Erw Las,Llwynhendy

94

18.8

1-5

6-10

PrC2/h16

Ynys Las, Llwynhendy

45

7.6

11-15

PrC2/h17

Adjacent 73 Parc Gitto, Llwynhendy

10

1

1-5

6-10

PrC2/h18

Dylan, Trallwm

32

32

1-5

PrC2/h19

Genwen, Bryn

260

51.4

1-5

PrC2/h20

Harddfan, Bryn

6

6

6-10

PrC2/h21

Maes Y Bryn, Bryn

34

34

1-5

PrC2/h22

Cwm y Nant, Dafen

280

56

6-10

11-15

PrC2/h23

Dafen East Gateway

150

30

1-5

6-10

PrC2/SS1

Wellness and Life Science Village (strategic site), South Llanelli

240

40.8

6-10

PrC2/MU2

Trostre Gateway (mixed use)

35

5.95

11-15

Kidwelly

SeC3/h1

Land adjacent to Brodawel

9

1.8

6-10

SeC3/h2

Land off Priory Street

20

3.4

11-15

SeC3/h3

Land to the rear of Park View Drive

24

4.8

1-5

SeC3/h4

Land at Former Dinas Yard

80

6

1-5

6-10

Burry Port

SeC4/h1

Gwdig Farm

105

21

1-5

6-10

SeC4/h2

Burry Port Harbourside

364

36.4

6-10

11-15

SeC4/h3

Glanmor Terrace

32

32

1-5

Pembrey

Sec5/h1

Garreglwyd

14

14

1-5

Sec5/h2

Cwrt Farm

100

20

1-5

6-10

Hendy / Fforest

SeC6/h1

Adjacent Clos Ty Gwyn

20

5

1-5

SeC6/h2

Land between Clayton Road and East of Bronallt Road

39

9.75

1-5

6-10

SeC6/h3

Coed y Bronallt

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

SeC6/h4

Adjacent to Clos Benallt Fawr, Fforest

35

4

1-5

SeC6/h5

Fforest Garage

17

1.7

6-10

Llangennech

SeC7/h1

Box Farm

7

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

SeC7/h2

Aber Llwchwr

10

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

SeC7/h3

Golwg Yr Afon

50

8.5

6-10

SeC7/h4

Opposite Parc Morlais

35

5.95

6-10

SeC7/h5

Maesydderwen

5

5

1-5

6-10

Trimsaran / Carway

SeC8/h1

Ffos Las

233

23.6

1-5

6-10

SeC8/h2

Land to the rear of Cae Linda

50

8.5

1-5

6-10

Mynyddygarreg

SuV22/h1

Land opposite Parc y Garreg

30

6

6-10

SuV22/h2

Land adjacent to Ty Newydd, Meinciau Road

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

SuV22/h3

Land at Llangadog Road

12

1.2

6-10

11-15

Five Roads / Horeb

SuV23/h1

Clos y Parc

20

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

SuV23/h2

Adjacent Little Croft

25

4.25

6-10

Total for Cluster

3059

Cluster 3

Ammanford (inc Betws and Penybanc)

PrC3/h1

Land at r/o No 16-20 & 24-30 Betws Road

8

3

6-10

PrC3/h2

Former Petrol Station, Wind Street

6

6

1-5

PrC3/h3

Land at Gwynfryn Fawr

28

28

1-5

PrC3/h4

Tirychen Farm

150

10

6-10

11-15

PrC3/h5

Yr Hen Felin, Pontamman Road

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

PrC3/h6

Land Adjoining Maes Ifan, Maesquarre Road

19

1.8

6-10

11-15

Capel Hendre

PrC3/h7

Delfryn Estate

15

1.2

1-5

Cefneithin

PrC3/h8

Land off Heol y Parc

18

1.8

6-10

11-15

Cross Hands

PrC3/h9

Land adjacent to Maesyrhaf

9

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

PrC3/h10

Land to the rear of Gwernllwyn

30

5.1

11-15

PrC3/h11

Land east of Carmarthen Road

60

20

6-15

PrC3/h12

Land adjoining A48 and Heol y Parc

8

0

1-5

6-10

PrC3/h13

Land at Heol Cae Pownd

101

7

1-5

Drefach (Tumble)

PrC3/h14

Nantydderwen

33

5.61

11-15

PrC3/h15

Land off Heol Caegwyn

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

PrC3/h16

Uwch Gwendraeth

6

1

1-5

PrC3/h17

Land part of Maesygwern, Heol Caegwyn

23

2.3

1-5

6-10

Gorslas

PrC3/h18

Land adjoining Brynlluan

29

4.93

11-15

Llandybie

PrC3/h19

Land off Llys y Nant

9

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

PrC3/h20

Land north of Maespiode

42

7.14

11-15

PrC3/h21

Maespiode

8

8

1-5

Penygroes

PrC3/h22

Adj. Pant y Blodau

79

8

1-5

6-10

PrC3/h23

Land at Waterloo Road

15

0

1-5

PrC3/h24

Land between 123 and 137 Waterloo Road

11

2

1-5

PrC3/h25

Land off Gate Road

8

8

1-5

PrC3/MU1

Emlyn Brickworks

177

35.4

6-10

11-15

Saron

PrC3/h26

Land off Parc-y-Mynydd

16

1.5

6-10

11-15

PrC3/h27

Land off Nant-y-Ci Road

18

1.8

11-15

Tumble

PrC3/h28

Land at Factory site between No. 22 & 28 Bethesda Road

30

7.5

1-5

6-10

PrC3/h29

Central Garage

24

5

1-5

PrC3/h30

Land off Gwendraeth Road

9

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

Tycroes

PrC3/h31

Land at Fforestfach

17

1

1-5

PrC3/h32

Land south of Tycroes Road

62

37

1-5

6-10

Brynamman

SeC9/h1

Land at Ardwyn Road

6

0

1-5

6-10

SeC9/h2

Heol Gelynen

8

Commuted Sum

11-15

Glanamman / Garnant

SeC10/h1

Garnant CP School, New School Road

9

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

SeC10/h2

Land adj. No 13 Bishop Road

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

SeC10/h3

Former Glanaman Primary School

7

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

SeC10/h4

Former Glanamman Hospital

28

28

1-5

6-10

Pontyberem / Bancffosfelen

SeC11/h1

Land off Heol Llannon

55

11

1-5

6-10

SeC11/h2

Land at Ffynnon Fach

19

2

1-5

Llannon

SuV25/h1

Land north of Clos Rebecca

47

3

1-5

6-10

Llanedi

SuV26/h1

Rear of 16 Y Garreg Lwyd

11

1

1-5

Carmel

SuV27/h1

Land adjacent to Tŷ Newydd

5

Commuted Sum Contribution

11-15

Cwmgwili

SuV28/h1

Adjacent to Coed y Cadno

18

2

1-5

Ystradowen

SuV30/h1

Land off Pant y Brwyn

5

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

Total for Cluster

1306

Cluster 4

Newcastle Emlyn

SeC12/h1

Trem y Ddol

17

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

SeC12/h2

Heol Dewi

14

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

SeC12/h3

Land to r/o Dolcoed

20

3.4

6-15

Llanybydder

SeC13/h1

Adj. Y Neuadd

10

1

6-15

SeC13/h2

Heol y Dderi

30

5.1

11-15

SeC13/h3

Troedybryn

23

3.91

6-10

11-15

Pencader

SeC14/h1

Blossom Garage

20

3.4

1-5

6-10

SeC14/h2

Land adj Maescader

24

4.08

6-10

11-15

SeC14/h3

Glanawmor

28

4.76

11-15

SeC14/h4

Bro'r Hen Wr

7

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Drefach/Felindre

SuV31/h1

Parc Puw

12

1.2

6-10

SuV31/h2

Parc Meirios

10

1

11-15

Waungilwen

SuV32/h1

Opposite Springfield

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

Llangeler

SuV33/h1

Land opposite Brogeler

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

11-15

Pentrecwrt

SuV34/h1

Land adjoining Brynywawr

14

1.4

1-5

6-10

Saron/Rhos

SuV35/h1

Land adj. Arwynfa

35

5.95

1-5

6-10

Llanllwni

SuV36/h1

Cae Pensarn Helen

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

11-15

SuV36/h2

Land at Bryndulais

10

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Cwmann

SuV37/h1

R/O Post Office

20

4

1-5

6-10

SuV37/h2

Land south of Cae Coedmor

20

3.4

6-10

11-15

SuV37/h3

Land adjacent to Lleinau

10

1

6-10

Capel Iwan

SuV38/h1

Maes y Bryn

11

1.1

1-5

6-10

SuV38/h2

Land adj Brynglas

5

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Llanfihangel ar arth

SuV39/h1

Adj Yr Hendre

7

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Trelech

SuV40/h1

Clos Y Cynin

8

0

1-5

6-10

Pontyweli

SuV41/h1

Adj Crug yr Wyn

19

1.9

11-15

New Inn

SuV43/h1

Blossom Inn

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

11-15

Total for Cluster

402

Cluster 5

Llandovery

SeC15/h1

Land to north of Dan y Crug

12

1.2

1-5

6-10

SeC15/h2

Land adjacent to Bryndeilog, Tywi Avenue

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

11-15

Llandeilo

SeC16/h1

Llandeilo Northern Quarter

27

4.59

6-10

11-15

SeC16/h2

Thomas Terrace

5

Commuted Sum Contribution

11-15

SeC16/h3

Land adjacent 28 Carmarthen Rd, Llandeilo

5

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Llangadog

SeC17/h1

Land opp. Llangadog C.P School

16

1.6

1-5

6-10

SeC17/h2

Land off Heol Pendref

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Talley

SuV47/h1

Land adjoining Ffynnon Dawel

7

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Cwrt Henri

SuV48/h1

Land adjacent to Glasfryn Court

16

1.6

1-5

6-10

Cwmifor

SuV51/h1

Opp. Village Hall

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

Total for Cluster

112

Cluster 6

St Clears / Pwll Trap

SeC18/h1

Adjacent to Brittania Terrace

60

12

6-10

11-15

SeC18/h2

Former Butter Factory

45

13.5

6-10

SeC18/h3

Land adjacent to Cefn Maes

50

8.5

11-15

SeC18/h4

Land at Heol Llaindelyn

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

SeC18/h5

Land adjacent to Gwynfa, Station Road

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

SeC18/h6

Land to the rear of Station Road

25

4.25

11-15

SeC18/h7

Land adjacent to Gardde Fields

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

SeC18/h8

Land at Cae Glas

5

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Whitland

SeC19/h1

Land at Park View, Trevaughan

8

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

11-15

SeC19/h2

Land at Whitland Creamery

48

11.4

1-5

6-10

Laugharne

SeC20/h1

Pludds Meadow

24

2

1-5

6-10

SeC20/h2

Adj. Laugharne School

42

13

6-10

SeC20/h3

Land off Clifton Street

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

Glandy Cross

SuV55/h1

Land to the r/o Maesglas

9

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

SuV55/h2

Land to the north of Cross Inn P.H

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

6-10

Efailwen

SuV56/h1

Land to the r/o Talar Wen

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

Meidrim

SuV58/h1

Land adj. to Lon Dewi

10

10

1-5

SuV58/h2

Land off Drefach Road

15

1.5

1-5

6-10

11-15

Bancyfelin

SuV59/h1

Maes y Llewod

17

4

1-5

SuV59/h2

North of Maes y Llewod

19

1.9

6-10

Llangynog

SuV60/h1

Land at College Bach

6

Commuted Sum Contribution

1-5

6-10

Pendine

SuV61/h1

Land at Nieuport Farm

10

1

6-10

Llanmiloe

SuV63/h1

Land at Woodend

28

4

1-5

6-10

Total for Cluster

461

Overall Housing Allocation

6986

Table 5: Housing Allocation Table



11.88 The housing land allocations identified through this policy and other provisions of this Plan seek to satisfy the housing land requirements for the County, with their distribution directing them to those settlements in a manner consistent with the overall strategy of the Plan and the principles of sustainability. The Plan however seeks to achieve this through a structured hierarchy and distribution of growth, in a manner which sees the majority of the housing land requirement focused on the sustainable centres of Carmarthen, Llanelli and Ammanford/Cross Hands. Further allocations are distributed across the remainder of the hierarchy.

11.89 Allocated sites capacities have been considered on a site by site basis and not through the application of a fixed standard. Sites within higher order settlements will undoubtedly have higher densities taking into account the type of developer that would bring the site forward, the site layouts of adjacent sites, its own site characteristics and site development factors. The same principles will be considered for more rural settlements which would have lower site densities in general.

11.90 Site numbers highlighted within the Policy HOM1 are intended to be indicative, and they will be subject to further consideration at application stage. Regard will also be had to the policies and provisions of this plan and other relevant design principles.

11.91 Proposals for the development of allocated housing sites submitted in applications for Full Planning or Reserved Matters permissions should be accompanied by a layout of the allocated site in its entirety to ensure the site is developed to its full potential. Reference should also be had to policy PSD2 in relation to masterplanning requirements.

11.92 The Plan will be supported by an Infrastructure Delivery Plan which provides further detail of the phasing, funding and delivery of infrastructure required for each allocated site. In this respect proposals will be required to incorporate appropriate phasing. This will be informed not only by the Infrastructure Delivery Plan but also policy requirements and mitigation in relation to potential impacts on the Welsh language and biodiversity.

HOM2: Housing within Development Limits

Proposals for housing developments on unallocated sites within the development limits of a defined settlement in Tiers 1, 2 and 3 will be permitted, provided they are in accordance with the principles of the Plan's strategy, policies and proposals.

11.93 Sites capable of accommodating five or more dwellings feature as allocated housing sites in the Plan (refer to Policy HOM1). However, within the development limits of defined settlements there may be opportunities for development on unallocated sites. Within the settlement hierarchy, land that has not been allocated is referred to as a windfall site in relation to housing development. Proposals should reflect the character of the area and be compatible with the provisions of the Plan.

HOM3: Homes in Rural Villages

In those settlements identified as rural villages under Policy SP16, proposals for 1 to 4 dwellings will be permitted for the following:

  • minor infill of a small gap between the existing built form; or,
  • logical extensions and/or rounding off of the development pattern that fits in with the character of the village form and landscape; or
  • conversion or the sub-division of large dwellings.

Such proposals will be subject to other detailed planning considerations set out within LDP policies.

Reference made to the guidance on acceptable plots in the County's rural villages (see below).

Proposals which exceed the 20% cap above the number of existing homes in the settlement, as at the LDP base date, will not be permitted except where they conform to Policy AHOM1 in relation to the provision of affordable homes.

11.94 The settlement framework for the Plan area identified in Strategic Policy SP16 recognises and reflects the area's diversity and that of its communities. In identifying the Rural Villages, the Plan seeks to make provision for those settlements which make an important contribution within their community.

11.95 These are often settlements which will have previously exhibited certain services and facilities but which may no longer exist. Whilst it may be argued that their role and function has diminished, they still represent an established community that offers opportunities for small scale and appropriate new homes within rural settings.

11.96 This part of the Plan's rural policy framework seeks to establish a flexible but controlled approach to the delivery of new homes within those settlements. The Plan considers the non-application of development limits, and utilise a criteria based assessment to define small scale housing opportunities in rural villages. This approach ensures that it would support the rural communities and to meet the need for new homes in rural parts of Carmarthenshire at a scale and at locations which maintain the essential character of the countryside.

11.97 In order to reflect the rural character and to prevent unacceptable and potentially detrimental levels of growth, a cap of 20% over and above the number of existing homes, as of the base date of the Plan in the settlement will be allowed.

11.98 Further guidance in the form of SPG will be published to support the interpretation and application of the above and the policy. The guidance will form part of a suite of SPG to support the support on the design and siting considerations in general and will enable proposals to effectively integrate with, and contribute to the development of cohesive and sustainable communities.

Guidance on Acceptable Plots

  1. Infill sites within these rural villages will generally take precedence over other locations (typically these are sites with built development on either side);
  2. Where appropriate, sites adjoining a rural village are also acceptable. Such sites will be required to adjoin the boundary of one property which forms part of the rural village group. All proposals which adjoin a group (as opposed to infill sites) will be required to demonstrate the following:
    • there is an existing physical or visual feature which provides a boundary for the group - reducing pressure for unacceptable ribbon development or rural sprawl;
    • where such a feature does not exist, there should be potential for such a feature to be provided so long as it is in character with the scale and appearance of the group;
  3. Proposals located in open fields adjoining a group, which have no physical features to provide containment will not be considered acceptable;
  4. Proposals which are located beyond clear physical features which form strong boundaries for a group (e.g. main roads, substantial tree belts, rivers etc.) will not be considered acceptable.

HOM4 - Homes in Non-Defined Rural Settlements

Proposals for new single homes in hamlets, or groups of dwellings (as defined within the supporting text below) which are not identified under Strategic Policy SP16 will be permitted where they meet a local need for affordable housing and conform to the following:

  1. The site is a small gap capable of accommodating only a single residential unit between existing dwellings, or is an appropriate rounding off of the development pattern;
  2. The development is of a scale that is consistent with the character of the settlement;
  3. The proposal will not result in an intrusive development in the landscape, and will not introduce a fragmented development pattern, nor create unacceptable ribbon development contrary to the general development pattern of the settlement or group of dwellings;
  4. The size of the property reflects the specific need for an affordable dwelling in terms of the size of the house and the number of bedrooms;
  5. That the occupancy of the dwelling is restricted both on first occupation and in perpetuity to those who have a need for an affordable dwelling.

Development within each hamlet or group of houses will be limited to no more than 2 local affordable needs dwellings.

11.99 In providing for our rural areas and their communities the policy seeks to reflect the important role affordable housing can play in meeting the specific needs of a locality. The aim is to allow for development in the countryside of a scale and at locations which maintain the essential character of rural Carmarthenshire whilst providing for the housing needs of local people.

11.100 It is also noted that such provision needs to be delivered within the backdrop of a national agenda centred on sustainability with placemaking at its heart. In this respect reference is made to the provisions of PPW Ed.10 which requires that all residential development away from existing settlements or centres be strictly controlled. The policy therefore in reflecting the provisions of national policy restricts local affordable need dwellings in rural areas to established hamlets or groups of dwellings. It also seeks to restrict the potential number of such dwelling to no more than 2 local affordable needs dwellings. This restriction applies to existing planning permissions where they remain valid post plan base date (1st April 2018).

11.101 Whilst the Revised LDP is supported by a robust evidence base it is acknowledged that details of housing need changes over time. Affordable housing proposals will be required to submit evidence demonstrating the specific local need and ensure that the proposal provides for the size, type and tenure of houses required. Proposals to meet speculative local need application will not be considered, rather they should relate to an identified need from individuals/families within the specific area.

11.102 Where available, local housing needs surveys should be utilised in providing this evidence. Alternatively, other forms of evidence may be considered appropriate including Strategic Housing Market Area Assessments and local needs/Lettings registers.

11.103 Occupancy controls will be imposed to ensure that the benefits of affordability are preserved in perpetuity for subsequent occupiers. The definition for Non-defined rural settlements and Local Needs Housing is set out in the Glossary of Terms.

HOM5: Conversion or Subdivision of Existing Dwellings

Proposals for the conversion or sub-division of appropriate dwellings into flats or dwellings of multiple occupation, will be permitted where:

  1. It would not result in an over-intensification of use;
  2. Suitable parking provision is available, or made available;
  3. The architectural quality, character and appearance of the building is, where applicable, safeguarded and its setting not unacceptably harmed.

11.104 This policy seeks to reflect the potential of conversion opportunities in appropriate existing dwellings as alternatives to new build. Such opportunities can often provide additional range and choice to the housing stock and offer alternatives for property owners, where single occupancy of larger dwellings is no longer appropriate.

11.105 Extensions should be subordinate to, and compatible with the size, type and character of the existing dwelling and not result in over development (reference should be made to policy PSD10: Extensions). Proposals will where appropriate be encouraged to incorporate the re-use of materials as part of any development.

HOM6: Specialist Housing

Proposals for new care home developments and extensions to established specialist housing facilities will be permitted within or directly related to the development limits of defined existing settlements (Policy SP16) where:

  1. It reflects the needs of the proposed occupants in respect of their safe and convenient access to shops, services, community facilities and public transport or active travel routes; and,
  2. It provides a suitable and appropriate quality, design and type of accommodation as well as the level of support and care for the intended occupiers

Proposals for specialist housing outside and not directly related to the defined development limits will only be permitted if it can be demonstrated that they are viable and sustainable and where:

  1. It is ancillary to an existing care home and not disproportionate to it in scale; or,
  2. It represents the appropriate conversion of an existing property, which is suitable to the needs of the proposed occupants and accords with both criterion a) and b) above.

11.106 The changing age profile with its continued projected move towards an ageing population over the plan period has the potential to result in an increased requirement in respect of Specialist Housing. Whilst certain requirements for assisted living or support needs will be addressed through adaptation of existing homes or through existing facilities, the need for the Plan to provide for the consideration for new care homes is recognised. Consequently, this policy seeks to provide a framework for considering proposals to make appropriate allowances for the needs of those requiring care.

11.107 For the purposes of this policy, the definition of Specialist Housing relates to nursing homes, sheltered housing, extra or close care housing (wardened), retirement facilities reflecting continuing care needs and other facilities where care is provided. Where a care home is proposed on a site allocated for residential use in the Plan, consideration will be given to the nature of the proposal and its suitability for the proposed location. The level of independence of residents will be an important consideration with 'closed door' homes not generally being considered appropriate.

11.108 The inclusion of care homes within or adjacent to the development limits ensures that residents have opportunities to integrate into the community with the developments forming part of the urban or built form. Community facilities and services for the purpose of this policy are defined as GP surgeries and shops. The accessibility of such infrastructure and facilities represent an important element of residents' needs.

HOM7: Renovation of Derelict or Abandoned Dwellings

Proposals for the renovation of derelict or abandoned dwellings outside the Development Limits of a defined settlement (Policy SP16) will be permitted where:

  1. It can be demonstrated that a significant part of the original structure is physically sound and substantially intact requiring only a limited amount of structural remedial works;
  2. The building demonstrates and retains sufficient quality of architectural features and traditional materials with no significant loss of the character and integrity of the original structure;
  3. There are no adverse effects on the setting or integrity of the historic environment.

In exceptional instances where it can be demonstrated that the original dwelling played a recognised and significant role in the history, culture, and development of Carmarthenshire, the use of photographic or documentary evidence may be accepted as a means to illustrate the original details of the dwelling.

11.109 The renovation of abandoned dwellings can make a small but important contribution to the needs of an area. The architectural value of a number of derelict or abandoned dwellings often reflects the traditional vernacular and should be recognised in the submission of such proposals. Extensions, access requirements or other aspects associated with the proposal should be sympathetic to the character of the original building and the landscape. Proposals which seek to make a positive contribution to the landscape qualities of the area will be encouraged.

11.110 Proposals which fail to satisfy the above (including re-build) will be considered as development in the open countryside and determined accordingly.

HOM8: Residential Caravans

Proposals for individual residential caravans will be permitted where:

  1. The caravan is required to temporarily house an essential worker, in agriculture, forestry or other appropriate employment undertaking who must live on the spot rather than in a nearby settlement; or,
  2. The caravan is temporarily required in conjunction with the construction of a single dwelling on a self-build plot, or during the construction of a replacement dwelling; and,
  3. The caravan or mobile home will be located close to other buildings where possible and will not cause significant access, parking, infrastructural or amenity problems; and,
  4. They will not have an unacceptable adverse impact on the Plan's wider landscape or nature conservation objectives.

11.111 The siting of a caravan/mobile home required in conjunction with the above will be conditioned to ensure its removal once its operational requirements have ceased. The period of any temporary consent will be assessed against the particulars of each application. In the case of deciding the timescale required for the siting of caravans/mobile homes in connection with the construction of a self-build dwelling, the duration of expected construction work will be the determining factor.

HOM9: Ancillary Residential Development

Proposals for ancillary residential accommodation in the form of an annexe will be supported where:

  1. It is to be used solely either by an independent relative or an individual with a reliance on the household, where an element of independence is to be provided; reliant in part on the main dwelling for facilities;
  2. Complementary to the main dwelling and strictly limited in terms of size, scale and floor area to reflect the needs of the user;
  3. Located within the existing curtilage of the main dwelling with no separate garden area, vehicle access, or segregated car parking;
  4. Designed to be subordinate to, and respects and enhances the character of the main dwelling.

Proposals for such accommodation should be physically attached and designed as an extension to the main dwelling with a linking internal doorway(s).

The accommodation will only be permitted where it is in the same ownership as the main dwelling. Future occupancy will be tied to the beneficial ownership of the main dwelling by means of a S106 agreement and/or Unilateral Undertaking.

11.112 Ancillary residential accommodation can provide a valuable function enabling a relative to live with their family whilst maintaining a degree of independence. Such accommodation however requires a level of control to ensure that it serves an ancillary function and does not result in the creation if a separate self-contained dwelling.

11.113 Any proposal should reflect its ancillary function and not include the full range of facilities associated with an independent dwelling nor should it be designed in a way that would make it capable of being converted or occupied as an independent dwelling. Proposals should be designed to reflect the occupant's identified essential needs, with basic provisions reflective of its ancillary purpose. In respect of a single occupant this would normally consist of one en-suite bedroom and a living area with small kitchenette.

11.114 The annexe will be required to be in the same ownership as the main dwelling with any application accompanied by details of its occupants, including their relationship and/or dependency with the main dwelling occupants, and ownership details of the annexe.

11.115 Annexes will normally only be permitted in the form of an extension to the main dwelling. Regard will be had to the need of the occupant in respect of the size of any outbuilding proposed for conversion. In this regard it may only be acceptable to convert part of the building to ensure the conversion provides only limited facilities commensurate with its ancillary purpose.

11.116 The annexe should not displace an existing use which would require the construction of a further alternative building to enable that use to continue. New build detached annexes will only be considered where it is satisfactorily demonstrated that an extension or conversion is not appropriate or possible, and will not be permitted at locations outside of the defined settlement limits.


Strategic Policy – SP 4: Affordable Homes Strategy

The Plan will maximise the delivery of affordable homes up to 2033 through the provision of a minimum of 1,600 affordable homes. This will support the development and enhancement of sustainable, balanced communities.

11.117 Affordable housing represents a key issue to be considered in the preparation of the Revised LDP particularly in contributing to the development of sustainable, balanced and cohesive communities.

11.118 This policy seeks to reflect the requirements set out in TAN 2 – Planning and Affordable Housing (2006) which seeks to put 'secure mechanisms in place to ensure that affordable housing is accessible to those who cannot afford market housing, both on first occupation and for subsequent occupants.'

11.119 There are two main types of affordable housing as defined in TAN2:

  • Social Rented Housing: provided by local authorities and registered social landlords; and
  • Intermediate Housing: where prices or rents are above those of social rented housing but below market housing prices or rents[5].

11.120 In assessing the need for affordable dwellings, regard is given to the most up to date Carmarthenshire Local Housing Market Assessment (LHMA). The 2019 LHMA identifies a 76% / 24% split in the requirement of households requiring market housing and those households requiring affordable housing. For the benefit of the LHMA, the County has been split into 4 Affordable Housing Action Areas, and a significant proportion of the number of the households requiring affordable housing fall within the Llanelli Action Area (47%). The LHMA also identifies the type and size of the housing required throughout the County, with Llanelli having a consistent spread of need across 1,2 and 3 bedroom homes. In general across the other Action Areas, the county requires the development of 2-bed and 3-bed housing to meet the affordable need. In analysing this data, there is a strong correlation between the location of affordable housing need and the distribution of proposed housing growth set out within the LDP strategy and settlement framework (see policy SP16).

11.121 Whilst the LDP and planning system seeks to support the delivery of affordable homes, it is only one of few mechanisms used to meet this need. This is reflected in the Council's Affordable Housing Delivery Plan 2016-2020 which sets out a five year vision for delivering affordable housing. The LDP's contribution to the target is set out in SP4 through:

  • On-site provision of affordable housing as a percentage of the overall development, or on sites acquired by social housing providers;
  • Off-site affordable housing in lieu of on-site provision;
  • Commuted sum contributions to support the delivery of affordable housing; and
  • Local Need housing.

11.122 Reference is also made to the Carmarthenshire Rural Needs Study 2019 which identifies a higher proportion of larger dwellings within the rural areas that contribute to higher house prices.[6] The LDP looks to support the growth of more affordable units within the rural communities to promote development for first time buyers or those in low income households.

AHOM1: Provision of Affordable Homes

On-site Contributions

An on-site contribution towards affordable housing will be required on all market housing allocations and windfall sites of 10 or more homes to meet the affordable housing target set out in Policy SP4. The percentage target level for affordable housing is based on the scale of development:

  • sites comprising 10 – 19 homes will be required to provide an affordable housing contribution of 10 - 15%;
  • sites comprising 20-50 homes will be required to provide an affordable housing contribution of 17 – 23%;
  • sites of 51 homes or more will be required to provide an affordable housing contribution of 20 – 25%.

The higher percentage in each range applies to sites in the Council's Affordable Housing Action Area with the highest median household income; and the lower percentage to the Affordable Housing Action Area with the median average household income.

Where adjacent and related residential proposals result in combined numbers meeting or exceeding the above thresholds, the Council will seek an element of affordable housing based on applying the above target percentages to the aggregate number of dwellings.

Proposals will be required to ensure that the dwelling remains affordable for all subsequent occupants in perpetuity.

Commuted Sums
A commuted sum towards affordable housing will be required from proposals comprising 1 – 9 dwellings. Commuted sum charges will be based on floor space (cost per sq.m).

Proposals for single dwellings categorised as 3-bed, 4-person dwellings or smaller, and less than 84 square metres will be exempt.

Only in exceptional circumstances, where the above requirements cannot be achieved due to their impacts upon a proposal's financial viability, a variation may be agreed on a case-by-case basis.

11.123 Policies AHOM1 and AHOM2 aim to assist the Council to meet its housing need and in particular to deliver the affordable housing need identified in Policy SP4.

11.124 The policy sets out the affordable housing contributions to be provided which varies according to the scale of the proposed development. The requirements of the policy reflect the findings of the Revised LDP's Viability Study and takes into consideration other factors such as the LHMA, past delivery rates and the need for flexibility to allow for variances between sites.

11.125 The Policy's requirements for on-site contributions apply to all proposed housing developments located within settlement boundaries with a capacity to deliver a net increase of 10 dwellings or more new homes. Those sites which fall outside of the settlement boundaries will be subject to the requirements of Policy AHOM2.

11.126 The policy's requirements for commuted sums apply to all proposed open market proposals resulting in a net increase of 1 – 9 new dwellings, with the exception on single dwellings which are categorised as 3-bed, 4-person homes and not exceeding 84 square metres in internal, habitable floor space.

11.127 The mix of dwelling sizes, types and tenure required to be provided on each site will vary according to the specific needs of the locality at the time of application. This will need to take into consideration the latest information on housing need from the LHMA, alongside any relevant local information such as the Council's waiting list and any recently delivered affordable housing units within the area.


AHOM2: Affordable Housing- Exceptions Sites

Proposals for 100% affordable housing development on sites immediately adjacent to the Development Limits of defined settlements (Tiers 1-3 in Policy SP16), will, in exceptional circumstances be permitted where it is to meet a genuine identified local need (as defined within the Glossary of Terms) and where:

  1. The site represents a logical extension to the development limits and is of a scale appropriate, and in keeping with the character of the settlement;
  2. The benefits of the initial affordability will be retained for all subsequent occupants;
  3. It is of a size, scale and design compatible with an affordable dwelling and available to low or moderate income groups;
  4. There are no market housing schemes within the settlement being, or projected to be available which include a requirement for affordable housing.

11.128 The granting of planning permission will be subject to conditions or planning obligations which ensure the affordable housing remains available to meet future local affordable housing needs. For clarity, development sites which include 100% affordable housing must accord with the criteria of this policy. Exceptions sites will only be permitted where satisfactory evidence is available which supports the provision.

11.129 Exceptions sites should not generally be considered in a settlement where existing allocations are being brought forward and an element of affordability is being provided as part of that development. Evidence will be required to demonstrate that no schemes on allocated sites are projected to commence within a reasonable time period.

11.130 Further information is provided through national policy in the form of PPW, TAN2: Planning and Affordable Housing and TAN6: Planning for Sustainable Rural Communities. Further elaboration and guidance on the implementation and interpretation of affordable housing will be set out in forthcoming SPG.


Strategic Policy – SP 5: Strategic Sites

In reflecting their contribution to the future growth requirements for Carmarthenshire and as key components of the Swansea Bay City Deal, two Strategic Sites have been identified as making an important contribution to the overall provision for growth during the Plan period:

The Life Science and Well-being Village, Llanelli (PrC2/SS1);

and Yr Egin – Creative Digital Cluster, Carmarthen (PrC1/SS1)

Life Science and Well-being Village, Llanelli

11.131 The Life Science and Well-being Village will provide facilities and services which promote and improve well-being, integrate business development, education, healthcare, leisure, tourism, wellness support and research in life-sciences in one location, and deliver transformational social and economic benefits. Outline planning permission was issued in August 2019 under application reference S/36948.

11.132 The village will include an institute of life science providing space for research and development into new medical devices and healthcare technologies. The institute will also offer large office, laboratory and clinical spaces for growing new regional companies as well as opportunities for business start-ups.

11.133 There will be a wellness hub which will include a leisure centre, outdoor sports facilities, recreation opportunities and well-being promotion activities. There will be assisted living, a care home and dedicated housing for people with cognitive impairment or in medical rehabilitation. An allowance has been made for 240 'C3 use class' units from this strategic site under LDP policy HOM1.

11.134 There will be a life science and well-being centre where a range of wellness services from health, public, private and third sectors will be available in one location. The centre will also include training opportunities which will be developed to meet skills shortages.[7]

11.135 This world leading development will be situated along the Llanelli coastline. It will be the largest ever regeneration project in South West Wales, and aims to improve the health and wellbeing of people across the region, creating up to 2,000 high quality, well paid jobs and boosting the economy by £467 million over 15 years. It will be interlinked and integrated within the natural landscape, set around a freshwater lake and located within walking distance of the Millennium Coastal Park.[8]

11.136 The outstanding coastal setting in post-industrial South Llanelli is testimony to a long standing track record of regeneration initiatives by the Council and its partners, including Welsh Government.

11.137 In noting the strategic context, this project remains firmly rooted in the promotion of wellness at a local level.

output

Figure 9: Carmarthenshire County Council – extract from indicative masterplan for the proposed wellness and life science village

Yr Egin – Creative Digital Cluster, Carmarthen

11.138 Yr Egin project provides a new digital and creative cluster in Carmarthen; provides start up and development space for creative digital companies, and promotes the Welsh Language.

11.139 The project will be the base for the Welsh language broadcaster S4C and will provide start up and development space for creative and digital companies.

11.140 By taking advantage of the new infrastructure proposals of the Internet Coast, Yr Egin will create major and positive change in the creative and digital economy of Wales.[9]

11.141 The opportunities afforded by this project are many and varied. In spatial terms, it is envisaged that it will re-affirm the role of Carmarthen as a key hub on the gateway to West Wales and a focal point for those rural communities to the north.

output

Figure 10: Carmarthenshire County Council – Yr Egin Site Masterplan



Strategic Policy – SP 6: Employment and the Economy

Sufficient land has been allocated for the provision of 77.93 hectares of employment provision for the Plan period in accordance with the Plan's Settlement Framework (Policy SP16) and sustainability principles.

The sustainable approach to the provision of employment land reflects the following:

  1. The allocation and delivery of:
    • The Llanelli Life Science and Well-being Village and
    • Yr Egin – Creative Digital Cluster, Carmarthen;
  2. Allocating employment land in sustainable location which accords with the sustainability principles of the Plan;
  3. Safeguard existing employment sites – recognising their contribution as part of the employment portfolio in meeting ongoing need;
  4. Supporting small scale sustainable employment developments and enterprises in lower tiered settlements. Ensuring support is provided to entrepreneurship as part of the creation of a diverse and growing economy;
  5. Allow appropriate small scale employment opportunities and rural enterprises in the countryside to support rural communities and to deliver a diverse and sustainable rural economy.

11.142 The future development of employment sites, and indeed the future economic development of the County should be viewed in the wider context. The Swansea Bay City Deal was signed in 2017, securing £1.3 billion for Swansea, Carmarthenshire, Neath Port Talbot and Pembrokeshire councils. It is anticipated that the Deal will transform the economic landscape of the area, boost the local economy by £1.8billion, and generate almost 10,000 new jobs over the next 15 years.

11.143 The Deal will see three specific projects for Carmarthenshire – two of which are related to physical developments. These are the Wellness and Life Science Village at Delta Lakes, Llanelli and a creative industry project at Yr Egin in Carmarthen. The third project relates to a skills and talent initiative which is centred within Carmarthenshire, and supports skills development within the region.

11.144 The Council has undertaken evidence gathering to provide an understanding of the future employment need notably around the Welsh Government's nine priority sectors.[10] Further evidence has been prepared in conjunction with Pembrokeshire County Council to establish quantitative analysis of forecast demand for employment sites and supplemented by market and employer evidence in relation to market demand.

11.145 The sub-regional study seeks to achieve a balance between fulfilling the requirements of Technical Advice Note 23 on Economic Development (February 2014), whilst placing a strong emphasis on flexibility, realism of sector growth and ability to meet demand at a regional scale.

11.146 TAN 23 considers that 'land provision targets may be higher than anticipated demand, to allow for the chance to meet demand. The Practice Guidance to the TAN (August 2015) considers, that where justified, land provision targets maybe higher than anticipated demand, to allow for the chance that the assessments are too low and to ensure that no opportunities are missed. In acknowledging the importance of not solely relying on employment forecasts when identifying a portfolio of employment land, the study emphasises the demand and confidence of indigenous businesses to remain and grow, and a desire by stakeholders to preserve locational advantages and strategic assets for future growth.

11.147 In recognition of the above, the study has identified a portfolio of sites within the study area which are considered to offer strategic benefits and opportunity for growth and job creation.

Employment Hierarchy

11.148 Whilst the strategic focus is associated with the Swansea Bay City Deal and the potential generation of 'valued added' jobs, the LDP will provide a range of sites and opportunities for potential inward investment and relocations. This includes potential sites for larger employers as well as sites to accommodate smaller scale uses with the policy framework also providing scope for new and start-up businesses.

11.149 In considering the level of employment land allocations in relation to the LDP, further regard has also been had to a range of considerations to ensure that the level of provision is reflective of not only a range of deliverable sites but also that they are based upon a robust understanding of their character and site areas.

11.150 The emphasis on the Principal Centres not only reflects their sustainability credentials but also their historic legacy. It is also (particularly in relation to Llanelli) indicative of the relatively high unemployment rates and levels of deprivation and of a strong commitment to address the problems. The distribution of employment land is also well-aligned with the sustainable locations within the County which are accessible by public transport or active travel routes which minimise the need for travel.

11.151 The following table sets out the employment land provision contained within the policy and identifies completion levels and sites which are committed by virtue of a valid planning permission.

A. LDP Alloc

B. Complete

C. Completed but not forming part of allocated figure.

D. Committed

E. Residual Supply

(A-B-D=E)

PC1 - Carmarthen

19.14

0

0

2.18

16.96

PC2 - Llanelli

15.77

0

0

0

15.77

PC3 – Ammanford/ Cross Hands

35.48

0

0

10.39

25.09

Service Centres

7.54

0

0

3.93

3.61

Sustainable Villages

0

0

0

0

0

Rural Villages

0

0

0

0

0

Total

77.93

0

0

16.50

61.43

Table 6: Employment Land Provision

11.152 It should be noted that the provision of allocated employment sites includes non-operational land with scope for landscaping, buffer zones and other such uses.

EME1: Employment- Safeguarding of Employment Sites

Sites identified for employment purposes through policy SP6 and existing employment sites will be safeguarded for such uses (B1, B2, B8 and those identified through relevant policy provisions).

Exceptionally, proposals which result in their loss will only be permitted where it can be demonstrated that:

  1. The site or premises is no longer required or suitable for employment use;
  2. The proposed use could not reasonably be located elsewhere in accordance with the policies of this Plan;
  3. There is sufficient quantity, quality and variety of employment land or premises that can be brought forward to meet the employment needs of the County and the local area;
  4. There is no economically viable industrial or business employment uses for the site and premises;
  5. An employment use would be incompatible with adjoining/surrounding uses;
  6. Where applicable the proposed uses are complimentary to the primary employment use of the surrounding area and will not cause an unacceptable impact on the operations of existing businesses.

11.153 This policy seeks to ensure that existing employment sites are protected from alternative uses. In order to maintain an adequate supply of employment land which provides for a range and choice of potential uses, this policy seeks to protect defined employment areas from competing uses which should be in better and potentially more appropriate locations.

11.154 In recognition of the pressures on employment areas from alternative uses (non-Class B), the policy accepts that some flexibility may in some instances be required. Such uses are often partial B class uses combining a small scale retail element with predominantly business, industrial or storage use, or are sui generis. It is also accepted that in meeting the needs of such uses, employment areas are often likely to be more acceptable than other locations such as residential areas, or even town centres. Any retail element will be expected to be ancillary to the primary use, and for trade purposes as opposed to the public.

11.155 Development proposals will, where necessary be required to incorporate appropriate measures to protect the amenity of neighbouring or nearby properties. Such measures may include the identification of buffer zones and suitable landscaping proposals.

11.156 Where appropriate, planning conditions will be imposed to prevent the loss of employment as the primary use.

EME2 Employment – Extensions and Intensification

Proposals for extensions and/or intensification of existing employment enterprises will be permitted provided that:

  1. The development proposals are not likely to cause environmental damage or prejudice other redevelopment proposals;
  2. The proposal does not extend and/or intensify a use or activity that might result in adverse amenity issues, or may not be compatible, with neighbouring uses;
  3. The development proposals are of an appropriate scale and form compatible with its location;

Proposals for the expansion of existing rural enterprises will be supported subject to the above provisions and the policies and proposals of this Plan.

11.157 Proposals which seek to extend and/or intensify a use or activity will not be favourably considered if they are not compatible with surrounding uses, or likely to result in adverse amenity issues which would prejudice other redevelopment proposals.

11.158 Appropriate expansions of existing businesses can contribute significantly to the local economy, and the re-development of existing sites where it will improve the quality of employment floor space particularly in meeting modern employment needs, will be supported.

11.159 This policy makes provisions for, and supports the rural economy and the appropriate expansion of established rural enterprises.[11] Reference should also be made to PPW and TAN23 Economic Development.

EME3: Employment Proposals on Allocated Sites

Proposals for B1, B2 and B8 employment development will be permitted on the following allocated employment sites where they comply with the proposed use of the site:

LDP Ref

Site Name

Location

Use Class

Ha.

PrC1/E1

Cillefwr Industrial Estate

Carmarthen

B1, B2, B8

4.62

PrC1/MU1

West Carmarthen

Carmarthen

B1, B2, B8

4.53

PrC1/MU2

Pibwrlwyd

Carmarthen

B1, B2, B8

8.95

PrC1/SS1

Yr Egin

Carmarthen

B2

1.04

PrC2/E1

North Dock

Llanelli

B2

0.84

PrC2/E2

Dafen

Llanelli

B1, B2, B8

14.93

PrC3/E1

Cross Hands East

Ammanford / Cross Hands

B1, B2, B8

8.70

PrC3/E2

Cross Hands West Food Park

Ammanford / Cross Hands

B1,B2,B8

7.31

PrC3/E3

Cross Hands Business Park

Ammanford / Cross Hands

B1,B2,B8

4.73

PrC3/E4

Meadows Road, Cross Hands

Ammanford / Cross Hands

B1,B2,B8

1.09

PrC3/E5

Parc Menter, Cross Hands

Ammanford / Cross Hands

B1,B2,B8

0.09

PrC3/E6

Capel Hendre Industrial Estate

Ammanford / Cross Hands

B1,B2,B8

2.88

PrC3/E7

Parc Hendre, Capel Hendre1

Ammanford / Cross Hands

B1,B2,B8

9.86

PrC3/E8

Cilyrychen Industrial Estate

Cilyrychen

B1,B2,B8

0.82

SeC4/E1

Dyfatty

Burry Port

B1,B2,B8

3.28

SeC13/E1

Old Foundry

Llanybydder

B1,B8

0.40

SeC16/MU1 & SeC16/E1

Beechwood Industrial Estate

Llandeilo / Rhosmaen

B1,B2,B8

1.25

SeC16/E2

Former Market Hall

Llandeilo

B1

0.20

SeC18/E1

St Clears Business Park

St Clears

B1,B8

0.44

SeC19/E1

Whitland Industrial Estate

Whitland

B1,B8

0.49

SeC19/E2

Land South of Former Creamery

Whitland

B1,B2,B8

1.48

Total

77.93

Table 7: Employment Proposals on Allocated Sites

Note:

Sites which offer the potential to accommodate In-Building Waste Management Facilities. A notional total figure of 20-30 ha of land is potentially available on these sites. Added to this figure are the potential capacity available at Nantycaws Waste Management Site, as well as possible land that may become available on existing employment, waste and other non-allocated sites during the Plan period.

11.160 The total figure in the above table includes notional figures for B use employment on Mixed Use sites (Policy SG1) and Strategic sites (Policy SP5).

11.161 Where appropriate other employment and ancillary uses will be permitted on allocated employment sites where the proposed development complements and enhances the site's role as identified in the Employment Site Allocation table.

11.162 Policy EME3 also enables the provision of complementary ancillary employment uses that fall outside the B use classes where this improves site viability and enables new site development. Ancillary uses that might be complementary include day nurseries, training centres, waste recycling and vehicle repairs. Retail uses will be considered against the LDP's retail policies.

EME4: Employment Proposals on Non-Allocated Sites

Proposals for employment development on non-allocated sites, but within the development limits of a defined settlement will be permitted where:

  1. it is demonstrated that no other suitable existing or allocated employment sites or previously developed land can reasonably accommodate the proposal;
  2. the development proposals are of an appropriate scale and form, and are not detrimental to the respective character and appearance of the townscape/ landscape;
  3. The development is compatible with its location and with neighbouring uses.

Employment proposals outside the development limits of a defined settlement (Policy SP16) will be permitted where:

  1. The proposal is directly related to a settlement or hamlet; or
  2. The proposal is supported by a business case which demonstrates that its location is justified; and
  3. The proposal is appropriate in scale and nature to its location;

11.163 It is evident that not all employment proposals will be appropriately accommodated on allocated employment sites. Policy EME4 therefore supports the economy by enabling, in both urban and rural areas, the provision of economic opportunities on non-allocated sites.

11.164 Within the development limits of a defined settlements, the policy requires proposals to demonstrate their locational requirement through a sequential approach to site selection. In the first instance, they must look to proposed and existing allocations to cater for employment need. Only then should non-allocated sites be considered.

11.165 For proposals outside the development limits of a defined settlement, they must show that they are directly related to a settlement or hamlet, or supported by a business case which justifies its location. The Plan recognises that small-scale enterprises have a vital role to play in the rural economy, and contribute to both local and national competitiveness and prosperity. Many commercial and light manufacturing activities can be appropriately located in rural areas without causing unacceptable disturbance or other adverse effects. In this respect, the development of small businesses would address any local need for employment accommodation.

11.166 Reference is made to policies RD3 Farm Diversification, RD4 Conversion and Re-use of Rural Buildings for Non Residential Use and EME5 Home Working for further opportunities for employment undertakings outside development limits.

EME5: Home Working

Proposals for home working (where planning permission is required) will be permitted where it can be demonstrated that it would be compatible with adjacent land uses, and that it would not result in any adverse impacts on local amenity and/or the character of the area.

11.167 The policy relates to small businesses operating from home providing for considerations resulting from the increasing trend for home working (for now and the future).

11.168 This Plan recognises that such businesses can play an important role in developing and supporting a diverse economy across the Plan area. It is recognised that many small businesses are started by individuals working from their own homes, and that such instances are likely to increase as technological innovations increase. In considering home working within the context of planning, it is recognised that it does not necessarily require planning permission. For instance, planning permission will not normally be required where the use for business purposes proposed for part of the house does not result in a change to the overall character of the property and its use as a dwelling.

11.169 Generally the requirement for planning permission results where the business activity ceases to be ancillary to its use as a dwelling or where the residential character of the property is altered. Where such businesses are of a scale and intensity where planning permission will be required, the Council will have regard to the implications of the proposal on surrounding properties and on the likely access and parking arrangements emanating from the nature of the proposal.

11.170 PPW encourages the growth of self-employment and micro businesses in rural areas. The policy seeks to adopt a supportive approach to home working and proposals where a planning permission is required (including change of use).

11.171 In considering proposals for rural enterprises regard should be had to the provisions of national policy in the form of PPW and TAN6 and Policy EME4.


Strategic Policy – SP 7: Welsh Language and Culture

The Plan supports development proposals which safeguard, promote and enhance the interests of the Welsh language and culture in the County. Development proposals which have a detrimental impact on the vitality and viability of the Welsh language and culture will not be permitted unless the impact can be mitigated. All development proposals subject to WL1, will be expected to identify measures which enhance the interests of the Welsh language and culture.

11.172 The Welsh language and culture play an important role in the social, cultural and economic life of Carmarthenshire's residents and visitors. The proportion of Welsh speakers in Carmarthenshire is significantly higher than the Welsh national average and as such is a significant part of the social fabric of the County's communities, providing a strong sense of place and identity.

11.173 Carmarthenshire in its entirety is considered to be an area of linguistic sensitivity. The 2011 Census indicates that 19.0% of the Welsh population are able to speak Welsh, whilst the correlating figure for Carmarthenshire stands at 43.9%. In terms of the geographical breakdown of the proportion of speakers across the County, this is lowest in the Glanymor electoral ward where 19.2% speak Welsh, and highest in Quarter Bach where 68.7% speak Welsh. The proportion of Welsh speakers is higher than the national average across each ward in the County, and it is largely for this reason Carmarthenshire in its entirety is considered to be linguistically sensitive. Additionally, the most recent Census data has shown a substantial decrease in the number of Welsh speakers across the County illustrating the language's vulnerability in Carmarthenshire.

11.174 The Plan seeks to 'promote the Welsh language and culture'[12] and is committed to contributing to the Welsh Government's long-term aim of achieving 1 million Welsh speakers by 2050[13]. To deliver on this aim, the Council will support, promote and enhance the Welsh language as a viable community language by ensuring that there are sufficient and proportionate employment and housing opportunities to sustain both the rural and urban communities in the County and by implementing an effective monitoring framework. In doing so, the Plan seeks to ensure that the local population have the opportunity to remain in Carmarthenshire rather than leave in search of work opportunities and housing, as well as the opportunity to return. Through aiming for sustainable growth, the Plan will also maximise opportunities for non-Welsh speakers who move to the County to be integrated into community life at a scale and pace that will not undermine the vitality and viability of the Welsh language and culture.

11.175 The need to safeguard, promote and enhance the Welsh language applies to developments proposed across the County and is not restricted to specific areas within the County. Development proposals will be required to acknowledge the official status of the Welsh language and commit to treating the Welsh language no less favourably than the English language.

11.176 Specific policies provide further guidance to ensure that development of an appropriate scale, type and character is delivered to meet the needs of the communities. Furthermore, the Revised LDP will seek to ensure that development occurs at a rate which can be absorbed and assimilated without damaging the character of the community.

11.177 The Plan also seeks to safeguard, promote and enhance the Welsh language in Carmarthenshire through other relevant policy objectives, namely through the provision of housing and affordable housing, promoting a vibrant economy and employment opportunities and the provision and retention of community facilities, amongst others.

WL1: Welsh Language and New Developments

All development proposals throughout Carmarthenshire will be required to safeguard and promote the Welsh language.

Allocated Sites

The following development proposals will be required to submit a Language Action Plan, setting out the measures to be taken to safeguard, promote and enhance the Welsh language:

  1. Residential developments of 10 or more homes in the Principal Centres and Service Centres;
  2. Residential developments of 5 or more homes in the Sustainable Villages; and,
  3. Retail, commercial or industrial developments with a total floorspace of 1,000 sqm or more.

Windfall Sites

The following proposals on windfall sites will be required to submit a Welsh Language Impact Assessment in support of a planning application as well as a Language Action Plan setting out the measures to be taken to safeguard, promote and enhance the Welsh language:

  1. Developments of 10 or more homes in the Principal Centres and Service Centres;
  2. Developments of 5 or more homes in the Sustainable Villages; and,
  3. Retail, commercial or industrial developments with a total floorspace of 1,000 sqm or more.

Proposals which do not accord with the Plan's housing trajectory (Appendix 7) will be required to provide a phasing plan outlining the timescales for delivering the homes proposed on the site, and demonstrate that they would not have a negative impact upon the Welsh language which cannot be mitigated.

Residential developments for 10 or more homes on both allocated and windfall sites will be required to positively contribute towards the vitality and viability of Welsh language community groups and Welsh language learning opportunities.

11.178 The Welsh Language Action Plan sets out the measures to be taken to safeguard, promote and enhance the Welsh language. The Welsh Language Action Plan should also outline how the development proposes to make a positive contribution towards the community's Welsh language groups. This could, amongst others, include providing support and funding towards organisations and bodies that provide activities, facilities and education for Welsh speakers and learners, and support and funding towards Welsh language classes. Welsh Language Impact Assessments (WLIA) will be required to outline the anticipated impacts of the proposed development upon the Welsh language in the County. Guidance on how to produce a WLIA are contained within the Welsh Language Supplementary Planning Guidance.[14]

11.179 Whilst support for projects can be provided through financial contributions, they may also be provided through other means. Planning permission will be subject to conditions or legal agreements to secure the implementation of the mitigation and enhancement measures proposed within the Action Plan. Further guidance on the content of Welsh Language Action Plans will be provided through Supplementary Planning Guidance.

11.180 The LDP's housing trajectory is outlined in Appendix 7 of the Plan. The impacts of the scale, location and rate of development have been assessed in accordance with the agreed trajectory. Proposals for developments which do not accord with the timescales of the trajectory are consequently not fully assessed. Such proposals will therefore be required to be supported by a phasing plan outlining the number of dwellings to be delivered within each financial year. In such cases, planning permission may be subject to a condition to secure the agreed phasing of delivery where considered necessary.

11.181 For the avoidance of doubt, it should be noted that criterion a, b, d and e noted above should be informed by the LDP's settlement hierarchy as outlined by Policy SP16. The Plan's Strategy provides for organic growth on a small scale within the Rural Villages. It is considered that incremental development on this scale can make a positive contribution towards the sustainable growth of the Welsh language in rural communities, and any negative impacts are likely to be absorbed by the community. Development of any greater scale is unlikely to be compatible with the Plan's Strategy, and their impacts are therefore unassessed and unknown. In the event that such proposals are presented for consideration, they will need to be accompanied by a full assessment of their likely effects upon the Welsh language.

11.182 The SA/SEA of the LDP is required to assess the likely effects of the LDP upon the Welsh language. This is done iteratively at key stages throughout the Plan's production. The likely anticipated effects are presented in the SA/SEA reports, and further information is available within the LDP's evidence base.

11.183 The LDP provides further guidance on the provision of bilingual advertisements in Policy PSD9 – Advertisements. In order to promote the cultural identity and to safeguard the local linguistic character of Carmarthenshire, the Council will encourage bilingual marketing of new housing and commercial developments as well as encourage Welsh street and development names.


Strategic Policy – SP 8: Infrastructure

Development will be directed to sustainable locations where the infrastructure, services and facilities considered necessary to deliver and support the development proposal are available, or can be provided.

Development proposals will need to demonstrate that there is sufficient capacity in the existing infrastructure to deliver and support the proposed development. Where this cannot be achieved, proposals will need to demonstrate that suitable arrangements are in place to provide the infrastructure capacity considered necessary to deliver and support the development.

Where new or improved infrastructure is required which does not form part of an infrastructure provider's improvement programme it may be permitted. In such instances it will be required tosatisfactorily demonstrate that adequate arrangements and funding are made available to deliver the required infrastructure.

The delivery of new or improved infrastructure, or other facilities or services to support the requirements of the site, must be undertaken in a timely manner to meet the needs of communities prior to, or from the commencement of, the relevant phases.

11.184 The provision of appropriate infrastructure, services and facilities is vital to ensure the delivery of the Plan's policies and proposals. Appropriate infrastructure is key to facilitate development but is also a necessity to support the ongoing needs and demands of a development and Carmarthenshire's communities.

11.185 A range of infrastructure may be required, and these will vary greatly according to the nature or type, scale, location and existing infrastructure provision. In considering the needs of development proposals the following infrastructure, services and facilities may be required:

  • Roads and other transport facilities including sustainable transport, public transport, walking and cycling routes
  • Schools and other educational and training facilities
  • Affordable Housing
  • Health
  • Public open spaces and green infrastructure
  • Flood defences
  • Leisure, sporting and recreation
  • Utility services
  • Biodiversity and environmental protection and enhancement
  • Community facilities
  • Digital Infrastructure
  • Welsh language support
  • Other facilities and services considered necessary

11.186 The Plan seeks to ensure that the infrastructure, services and facilities needed to support development is delivered in a timely manner prior to, or upon commencement, of the development, or where appropriate phased through the development process. The Plan encourages the delivery of infrastructure is undertaken in a coordinated manner with minimal disruption caused to existing communities.

11.187 Contributions to infrastructure will be secured through conditions or Planning Obligations in accordance with the legislative and policy framework provided.[15] Reference should be made to Policy INF1: Planning Obligations.

11.188 Developers should have regard to Appendix 7: Housing Trajectory and to the emerging implementation and delivery evidence which provides additional information in respect of the delivery and infrastructural requirements of the LDP's key sites. Regard should also be to the requirements of Policy PSD2: Masterplanning. Developers are encouraged to enter into early dialogue with the Council in order to identify the infrastructure required to deliver and support a proposed scheme.

INF1: Planning Obligations

Where necessary, planning obligations will be sought to ensure that the effects of developments are fully addressed in order to make the development acceptable. Contributions will be required to deliver or fund improvements to infrastructure, community facilities and other services and facilities to address requirements or impacts arising from new developments.

Where applicable, contributions will also be sought towards the future and ongoing maintenance of such provision.

In instances where there is a dispute regarding matters relating to the financial viability of delivering the requirements, the applicant will be required to meet the Council's costs of securing an independent financial viability appraisal / assessment.

11.189 The requirements of planning obligations will take into consideration the financial viability of a proposed development. In instances where there is dispute regarding the impact which the requirements have upon the financial viability of the scheme, the applicant will be required to meet the costs of securing an independent viability appraisal, completed by a suitably qualified and approved third party.

11.190 The planning obligations required will be considered on a case by case basis subject to the nature of the proposal and the requirements emerging from it. There may be instances where all required obligations cannot be secured due to their impact upon the scheme's financial viability. In such cases, the infrastructural priorities for that site will need to be identified. Whilst the priorities can vary according to the specific needs of each site and their communities it should be noted that the requirements of Policy NE4 Development within the Caeau Mynydd Mawr SPG Area will be prioritised above other contributions in respect of sites within the SPG Area. In all other instances, it is generally considered that the prioirity for the Authority will be the provision of affordable housing and in most cases its provision will be prioiritised above other contributions.

INF2: Healthy Communities

Proposals for development which provide for active travel, accessible useable green spaces and infrastructure, and which seek to reduce health inequalities through encouraging healthy lifestyles, addressing the social determinants of health and providing accessible health care facilities will be supported.

Proposals for development specified within the supporting text below will be required to submit a Health Impact Assessment in accordance with the sequential approach.

11.191 The links between health and well-being and planning are reflected in legislation and national planning policy. In this respect PPW seeks to provide a framework for the delivery of a series of National Sustainable Placemaking Outcomes. This holistic approach to the planning and design of development and spaces reflects a focus on positive outcomes promoting people's prosperity, health, happiness, and wellbeing. The promotion of physical and mental health and well-being as a Facilitate Accessible and Healthy Environments Outcome reflects these links between health, well-being and planning and the need to reflect any potential effects that may arise from the planning process.

11.192 Health Impact Assessment (HIA) can make a valuable contribution when proposing or making decisions on new development. Evidence on health impacts can help the planning system develop stronger and more coherent approaches towards maximising health and well‑being[16]. The Public Health (Wales) Act 2017 sets out provisions for making improvements to health including for the Welsh Ministers to publish a national strategy on tackling obesity and to make regulations about the carrying out of health impact assessments by public bodies.

11.193 HIAs assess the impact of any change or amendment to a policy, service, plan, procedure or programme on the health of the population and on the distribution of those effects within the population, particularly within vulnerable groups. Undertaking a HIA produces information on how negative impacts on health can be reduced and positive health gains can be encouraged. Such evidence on health impacts can help the planning system develop stronger and more coherent approaches towards maximising health and well‑being.

11.194 It is important that proposals take into account a wide range of health and well-being related factors as part of the formulation and preparation of any scheme or development. It is important that these are considered from the outset. Consequently, developers are encouraged to engage with the local planning authority and other stakeholders, such as the Local Health Board (LHB) as early as possible in preparing development proposals. A HIA should be provided to accompany any application for opencast coal working.

Healthy Communities: HIA Sequential Checklist

11.195 To assist in the promotion of physical and mental health and well-being, the following sequential approach should be considered by developers followed to determine the requirement for, and potential scope and content of a HIA. This requirement applies to major developments are defined in planning legislation as:

  • Residential developments of 10 or more dwellings or 0.5 hectares or more;
  • The provision of a building or buildings where the floor space to be created by the development is 1,000 square metres or more; or
  • Development carried out on a site having an area of 1 hectare or more

11.196 The following sequential approach in considering the need to a HIA reflects the guidance set out within Health Impact Assessments a Practical Guide[17].

  • STEP 1: Screening – Deciding whether to undertake a HIA Screening takes an initial look at the potential impacts of the proposal on the local population and any specific vulnerable groups defined within it. It should highlight any potential health risks or benefits and any groups that may be particularly affected. The outcome of screening is a decision whether or not to undertake HIA and, if so, to determine what type of HIA will be required. It should also provide an explanation of how the decision was reached.
  • STEP 2: Scoping – Determining the focus, methods and work plan.This stage involves asking a number of questions and making a number of decisions to establish the terms of reference, roles and responsibilities and agreed plan for the HIA.
  • STEP 3: Appraisal of Evidence – Identifying the health impacts. This is the key stage of health impact assessment. The purpose is to gather information about the potential nature, size, likelihood and distribution of the proposal's health impacts. It also provides an opportunity to suggest possible ways of maximising the health benefits and minimising the risks, particularly to those whose health may be most vulnerable or the most disadvantaged population groups. It also provides an opportunity to identify and suggest actions that might address 'gaps' in the proposal or plan. Although HIA is not in itself a research method, it draws upon a range of sources of information and methods for collecting and analysing data, to which appropriate methodological rules and procedures will apply.
  • STEP 4: Reporting and Recommendations - Once the evidence and data has been collected, a set of recommendations should be developed, informed by the previous stages of the HIA. These recommendations should aim to maximize any potential health and well-being benefits and mitigate potential negative impacts. They can be an opportunity to 'fill in' any identified gaps within the proposal and readdress any health (or other) inequalities that may be caused.

Recommendations need to be:

  • Clear and concise
  • Realistic
  • Achievable
  • Manageable in number
  • Impartial
  • Reflective of all evidence and representatives' views
  • Agreed by consensus

Reference should be made to guidance in the form of SPG.

Not all the health and well-being related issues will be relevant to all types of developments and the Council recognises the need for a balanced approach to the determination of development proposals where health related matters are one of many other material considerations. Developers will be expected to utilise the sequential approach specified above to identify what is relevant and ensure it is included in the supporting documentation accompanying any proposal as appropriate.

INF3: Broadband and Telecommunications

The Council will work with the telecommunications industry and the communications regulator Ofcom to maximise access to reliable super-fast broadband, wireless hotspots and improved mobile availability for all residents and businesses, assisting them (where appropriate) in delivering their investment plans to address any infrastructure deficiencies.

New major developments must be served by a high speed and reliable broadband connection to the premises.

Smaller developments should provide access to the most viable high-speed connection as well as additional ducting for future Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) or other provision.

Exceptions will be made where applicants have shown through consultation with broadband infrastructure providers, that this would not be possible, practical or economically viable. In such cases, an equivalent developer contribution towards off-site works may be sought which could enable greater future access.

11.197 The policy seeks to reflect the demands of a modern Wales for reliable fast and high capacity communication networks. In this respect it supports the Welsh Government's objective to offer fast and reliable broadband to every property in Wales and to support the deployment of mobile infrastructure across the country[18]. It seeks to reflect the context of broadband infrastructure as an essential service and one which can help support and develop the local economy as well as vibrant and inclusive communities.

11.198 In applying the policy, it should be noted that BT Openreach and other providers offer superfast broadband connection for all new developments, either free of charge, or as part of a co-funded partnership including community funded partnerships. FTTP shall be provided free of charge to housing developments with one hundred or more dwellings. Developments smaller than this may have to provide contributions to ensure FTTP connection, or shall be provided copper connections for free.

11.199 In supporting the delivery of full fibre, BT Openreach have set UK wide targets, and provide guidance and support to developers in building full FTTP networks to new residential or mixed residential/commercial sites.

11.200 The policy also recognises that in a small proportion of cases, broadband will not be able to be provided to new developments due to their very rural location. The policy therefore includes the potential to provide a sum of money to contribute towards an alternative solution. However, wherever possible the solution should include the development making necessary provision for on-site infrastructure to facilitate the improvements.

11.201 The provision of high-speed and reliable broadband within rural areas will assist in supporting the delivery of the Plan's strategy through providing additional opportunities to boost the rural economy and economic diversification.

INF4: Llanelli Waste Water Treatment Surface Water Disposal

Proposals that drain to Llanelli Waste Water Treatment Works and are defined as major under Article 2 of the Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (Wales) Order 2012 will be subject to a requirement to remove a quantifiable amount of surface water from the combined sewer system as set out within the Burry Inlet Supplementary Planning Guidance.

11.202 Within the Llanelli Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW) catchment, there are concerns that the connection of foul flows generated by new development introduces the risk of deterioration in the water quality of the Carmarthen Bay and Estuaries European Marine Site (CBEEMS). This is due to the fact that the majority of the sewer system in the Llanelli WWTW area is combined (surface and foul flows).

11.203 Whilst Dŵr Cymru Welsh Water (DCWW) have confirmed that there is sufficient capacity within Llanelli WWTW to deliver this Plan's identified growth, they have also requested that relevant developments within the Llanelli WWTW catchment be subject to a requirement to undertake compensatory surface water removal from the system as part of the granting of planning permission.

11.204 There is concern that introducing additional foul flow can lead to overloading to the WWTW, as well as an increasing the frequency of discharges from storm sewerage overflows out to the CBEEMS during significant rainfall. There can also be potential localised flooding issues resulting from these issues.

11.205 The Burry Inlet SPG has been prepared to provide specific guidance in relation to the consideration of relevant development proposals located within the Llanelli WWTW catchment. Whilst Llanelli (Principal Centre) and Burry Port (Service Centre) are identified as a focus for growth in this Plan, they are also subject to high level environmental considerations, not least the water quality of the (CBEEMS). Reference can also be made to LDP policy CCH3: Water Quality and Protection of Water Resources.

11.206 The Burry Inlet SPG has been built on consensus and seeks to provide certainty for stakeholders and developers alike. Its primary function is to assist in the delivery of growth as set out within this Plan. It provides a mechanism for the requirement for compensatory surface water removal to be undertaken by relevant developments. This is designed to allow development to contribute towards an overall betterment in the position, whilst alleviating concerns that proposals will be subject to objections by key stakeholders – notably DCWW and Natural Resources Wales.

11.207 There is a long established partnership approach with regards to this matter, including a Memorandum of Understanding.

11.208 The SPG also provides clarification on instances where Carmarthenshire County Council is the applicant and seeks to utilise surplus betterment it has previously accrued on the surface water removal register.


Strategic Policy – SP 9: Gypsy and Traveller Provision

The following Local Authority sites are allocated to meet the identified need for Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation and to allow for the potential future expansion of Gypsy and Traveller Households:

Site Ref:

Location

Type of Need

PrC2/GT1

Land at Penyfan, Trostre, Llanelli

Residential

PrC/GT2

Penybryn (extension), Bynea, Llanelli

Residential

Table 8: Gypsy and Traveller Provision

11.209 To consider the future Gypsy and Traveller provision within Carmarthenshire, the County Council has undertaken two Gypsy Traveller Accommodation Needs Assessment (GTAA) which identify the current unmet need for Gypsy and Traveller pitches within the County. The initial report was undertaken in 2015 to cover the period up to 2031, whilst the 2019 update ensures that the Plan is informed in terms of Gypsy and Traveller need for the Plan period through to 2033.

11.210 The Assessments consider the methodology set out by Welsh Government Guidance and outlines two types of the assessment of need; the first considers the first 5 years of the GTAA period; and the second considers the full 15 year GTAA period.

11.211 Based on the 2019 Gypsy and Traveller assessment, the current unmet need is for 19 pitches, whilst Carmarthenshire's estimated provision for the first 5 years is for 23 additional pitches. A large proportion of this need has arisen from households living in bricks and mortar, and new household growth from within these households. The make-up of this need is located within Llanelli, where a large number of these households had previously lived on the public site at Penybryn.

11.212 An estimate has also been made for newly arising Gypsy and Traveller households in years 6-15 of the GTAA. This would include, for example, young adults living on existing sites who, in time, will form their own household and therefore would require their own pitch. The GTAA estimates a need for 8 further pitches in years 6-15, totalling a requirement of 31 pitches through to 2033.

11.213 The GTAA also looked at the accommodation needs for Travelling Showpeople within Carmarthenshire. This element of the assessment identified 9 authorised or tolerated pitches for Travelling Show people within the county. In considering the future projection, the 2019 assessment identifies a requirement of 4 additional pitches in the first five years of the assessment.

11.214 The requirement and take-up of pitches will also be closely monitored as part of the monitoring framework of this plan and reported through the Annual Monitoring Report arrangements.

GTP1: Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation

  1. Proposals for new Gypsy and Traveller sites, or extensions to existing authorised sites within the development limits of a defined settlement will be permitted where:
    1. The necessary range of facilities and services, including existing community, social, and educational provisions, and public transport is accessible or can be readily provided;
    2. The proposal will have no significant adverse impacts on the amenity of residents and adjoining land uses;
    3. The site is capable of being serviced with water, electricity, sewage and waste disposal;
    4. There is no adverse effect on its surroundings, landscape/townscape or the setting and integrity of the historic environment.
  2. New, or extensions to existing authorised sites outside the development limits of defined settlements will be permitted in accordance with the above, where it can be demonstrated that there are no suitable pitches available on existing authorised sites, within the development limits of a defined settlement (relating to where the need has been identified), or that there is no opportunity to appropriately extend those sites.

Proposals for a transit or touring site will be considered where they have good connections to the Strategic Road Network.

11.215 The policy provides the framework and context for the consideration and assessment of proposals for new sites, and extensions to Gypsy and Traveller sites (and for Travelling Show People) reflecting the provisions defined within primary legislation[19].

11.216 The design of any sites will be required to have regard to the provisions of the appropriate Welsh Government Design Guidance[20].

11.217 This guidance will be a material consideration in the determination of any planning applications submitted. In relation to any site being developed by a public body, including the local authority, the provisions of Welsh Government Guidance: Designing Gypsy and Traveller Sites will apply.

11.218 Proposals must give consideration to vehicular access from the public highway; as well as provision for parking, turning and services on site; and road safety for occupants and visitors.

11.219 Landscaping and planting with appropriate trees and shrubs should be used to blend sites into their surroundings, give structure and privacy, and maintain visual amenity. Excessive hard landscaping, high walls, or fences should be avoided as these can lead to a site's isolation from the wider community.

11.220 Proposals will need to have regard to local infrastructure and demonstrate that the site is able to provide sufficient facilities and access to utilities. The scale of proposals should be proportionate to its surroundings and to the local community. Further guidance should be sought from Welsh Government's Designing Gypsy and Traveller Sites Guidance.

11.221 Applications will be expected to include evidence to demonstrate that the new site or the extension to an existing site is required at that location. Such information should include evidence demonstrating a lack of availability of suitable permanent or transit pitches on existing sites, or an opportunity to extend those sites to meet the required need.

11.222 The 2015 and 2019 Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Assessments (GTAA) assessed the need for transit sites or emergency stopping places for the Travelling Community who either travel permanently or for part of the year. The assessment sought to analyse records of unauthorised sites and encampments with data from the Traveller Caravan Count was also considered. Analysis of the recorded number of authorised and unauthorised caravans in Carmarthenshire decreased.

11.223 The Welsh Government introduced a new monitoring mechanism to track and identify illegal transit encampments. The AMR for 2018/19 identified a number of illegal encampments, but none were for transit purposes. Consequently the data does not indicate any clear pattern as yet which requires intervention through the identification of a transit site. Reference should be had to the monitoring framework of the plan.

11.224 In relation to the needs arising for Travelling Showpeople as indicated through the GTAA, there is at present no spatial correlation with that need which would enable the identification of a suitably located site. The plan seeks to provide the appropriate flexibility to meet that need through the provisions of the above policy and liaison with the community to identify any specific locational need.


Strategic Policy – SP 10: The Visitor Economy

Proposals for tourism and visitor economy related developments will be supported where they:

  1. exhibit high quality design and placemaking principles;
  2. contribute to the protection and enhancement of the natural environment;
  3. add value to our visitor economy;
  4. are sustainably and appropriately located.

11.225 Tourism is a key component of Carmarthenshire's economy. It is a major source of employment and revenue supporting over 6,176 full time equivalent jobs either directly or indirectly. It generates over £441m revenue to the County's economy annually.[21]

11.226 The County is home to a wide range of attractions, including Ffos Las Racecourse, the National Botanic Gardens and Pembrey Country Park. Carmarthenshire is the "cycling hub of Wales", with the Cycling Strategy capturing the Council's aspirations to be a national lead in the provision of cycling infrastructure events and development.[22]

11.227 Tourism is a dynamic industry with a wide demographic / customer base. Carmarthenshire is well poised to capitalise on the sector's potential given that it is a beautiful county located within a four hour drive of London and within easy reach of Ireland via sea. The ever changing demands and trends within the sector do however provide challenges in terms of drafting 15 year land use planning policies. The tourism offer within Carmarthenshire ranges from those natural features such as rights of way / walking to well-established renowned national attractions. The County's heritage and activity tourism potential is renowned, whilst its outstanding natural environment could appeal to the wellness tourism sector.

11.228 SP10 sets the framework for a policy approach within the Revised LDP that is sufficiently responsive and flexible to market demand up to 2033, whilst also seeking to protect the very communities, landscape and townscape that makes Carmarthenshire a fantastic place to visit and enjoy. Whilst the strategic policy provides the overarching context, specific policies provide detail. This includes clarifying any role that the settlement limits of defined settlements play in informing the determination of proposals.

11.229 In interpreting SP10, it should be noted that tourism related developments includes new, as well as extensions to existing facilities.

11.230 Extensions to existing facilities should be subordinate in scale and function to the existing facility and proposals that constitute substantive extensions should be construed as new development.

Adding Value

11.231 Proposals can add value to the County's visitor economy by contributing to the creation of a diverse, high quality, all year round destination and accommodation offer. Economic benefits could range from an increase in visitor numbers and visitor days to job creation, contributing to a wider mix of accommodation and attraction types – as well as extending the tourism season beyond the summer months. There are opportunities for proponents to seek to align to and support those emerging corporate priorities, including the Council's cycling aspirations. It is accepted that added value will be commensurate with the scale and nature of the proposal. Proposals that contribute to the development of a wider network of attractions within the County, thus increasing the overall offer and stay/spend period, offer clear potential to yield added value.

Respecting the County's social, economic and environmental fabric

11.232 All parts of the County possess qualities that contribute to the overall sense of place. These include landscape, nature conservation, social fabric and built environment. These are assets which must be protected for our future generations and cannot be unduly compromised by tourism related development.

11.233 There should also be an emphasis on high quality in all aspects of proposals, particularly design. In considering the acceptability of proposals, consideration will be given to location, siting, design and scale, access to the primary and core highway network and the impact of any resultant traffic generation. Furthermore, the extent to which the site is serviceable by public transport, walking and cycling are important considerations. The scale, size and type of any proposals will be appraised along with siting and impact. Proposals should reflect the character and appearance of the area with appropriate landscaping and screening utilised as required.

Sustainably located

11.234 In recognising market demand, tourism related development should be directed to sustainable locations. Reference is made to the Sustainable Transport Hierarchy for Planning[23]. Regard should be had to the LDP spatial strategy in determining the appropriateness of any location. In this respect the scale and nature of the proposal will be important considerations, as will its siting, appropriateness and its spatial context. The specific policies provide further guidance on the implementation of this spatially driven approach.

11.235 Tourism related proposals should reflect the character of the area and the impacts on the vicinity of the site as part of a place making approach. A recognition of the sense of place within the vicinity of the proposal should be implicit within the context of the cluster based approach which groups the settlement framework. In spatial terms, this would indicate that those larger scale high trip generating tourism proposals lend themselves to being situated in the south of the County where the infrastructure is in place to support them.

11.236 In noting the established primarily coastal offer that characterises the south west of the County, due regard will need to be given to any landscape impact arising from any potential for an over intensification of uses.

11.237 The County's rural areas are well placed to accommodate proposals for high quality and sustainable proposals that are of an appropriate scale. Proposals should respect the County's assets whilst supporting vibrant rural communities.

11.238 Some tourism related developments, by their very nature, must be located in the countryside. It is important that these developments do not have any significant negative impact on the landscape, natural environment or amenity. In terms of the detailed policies for the Revised LDP, the emphasis is on providing clarification on the 2 notable challenges and opportunities facing the visitor economy in Carmarthenshire which are attractions (somewhere to go) and accommodation (somewhere to stay).

VE1: Visitor Attractions and Facilities

  1. Proposals for high quality visitor attractions and facilities, including appropriate extensions to existing facilities will be permitted, where they are located within, or directly related to a defined settlement (Policy SP16).
  2. All other proposals for high quality visitor attractions and facilities not considered under Point 1 above will be permitted, where they are demonstrably reliant on the specific attributes of the site / open countryside location. Proposals should demonstrate that the following sequential approach has been undertaken where the adaptation and re-use of an existing building has been considered in the first instance; then previously developed land; then a greenfield location.

All proposals should reflect and respect the role and function and sense of place of the area, most notably in terms of scale, type, character, design, layout and appearance.

Where appropriate, proposals should be accessible by various modes of transport - especially sustainable modes of transport - such as walking, cycling and public transport.

11.239 This policy acknowledges the economic opportunities afforded by the tourism sector but also emphasises the importance of maintaining the social, economic and environmental integrity of the County. There should be no social, economic and environmental harm arising from the proposal and satisfactory levels of accessibility must be in place.

11.240 The provision of a range and choice of attractions and facilities can assist in unlocking the County's visitor economy potential. 'Rainy day' attractions offer particular potential to counter issues of seasonality, whilst job creation opportunities should also be maximised. Dual use facilities – i.e. attractions that are open to day trippers and the local community, offer potential wider benefits. Proposals that seek to align with a wider network of attractions within the County do provide potential to broaden the overall offer as well as increase the length of stay and amount of monetary spend in Carmarthenshire's visitor economy.

11.241 Proposals that are not located within or directly related to a settlement defined in Policy SP16 should demonstrate that the specific location is essential both in terms of the viability and feasibility of the development. The applicant will need to demonstrate why the specific location is essential and why the proposal is highly dependent on the attributes of the site. This could be done by clarifying how the site / proposal is visually, functionally and spatially connected to a defined feature. This could include a natural, historic, or man-made features (e.g. an established facility).

11.242 Proposals that are not located within or directly related to a settlement defined in Policy SP16 should first look at re-using or extending existing buildings. Should there be no existing building to accommodate the new proposal, previously developed land should be considered, followed lastly by greenfield sites.

11.243 Where relevant, the Council will seek the submission of a tourism supporting statement. Such a statement provides a mechanism for the applicant to demonstrate the policy alignment of the proposal. A statement can also provide an applicant with the opportunity to fully demonstrate the economic credentials of the proposal (as commensurate with size/scale etc).

Policy VE2: Permanent Holiday Accommodation

  1. Proposals for high quality serviced accommodation, including appropriate extensions to existing accommodation, will be permitted where they are located within, or directly related to a defined settlement (Policy SP16).
  2. Proposals for serviced and self-catering accommodation that are located outside of the above locations will only be permitted where they consist of the re-use and adaptation (including conversion) of existing buildings. Proposals for the re-use and adaptation (including conversion) of existing buildings should comply with the following criteria:
    1. the form, bulk and general design of the proposal, including any extensions, respect the rural character and appearance of the building;
    2. the original building is structurally sound and any rebuilding works, necessitated by poor structural conditions and/ or the need for new openings in walls, do not involve substantial reconstruction;
    3. where applicable, the architectural character and traditional materials have been retained and the proposal does not result in the loss of the original structure's character, or that the construction of the building is of sufficient quality not to require substantive or wholesale refurbishment;
    4. the proposal conforms with criteria a), b) and c) of Policy RD4.

All proposals set out above should reflect and respect the role and function and sense of place of the area, most notably in terms of scale, type, character, design, layout and appearance - as well as those uses already located in the vicinity of the site.

11.244 This policy acknowledges the benefits of a diverse accommodation offer in terms of providing a range and choice of places to stay. The potential contribution of high quality hotels and other serviced accommodation in augmenting and broadening the County's service sector economy is duly noted. This can offer a range of economic benefits, whilst also allowing the County to broaden its offer and appeal to wider demographic / customer bases, and secure an increased amount and duration of visitor spend.

11.245 This policy applies to a variety of different types from large high quality hotels to small bed and breakfast accommodation.

11.246 Where planning permission is given for permanent holiday accommodation, the Council will consider the attachment of conditions restricting the use to holiday accommodation only. Seasonal occupancy conditions may also be used to prevent the permanent residential occupation of such accommodation.

11.247 Buildings that are of a substandard modern utilitarian construction (including materials such as single skin concrete block work, portal framed buildings clad in metal sheeting) or buildings of substandard quality and / or incongruous appearance will not generally be considered appropriate for conversion to holiday accommodation. Reference should also be made to Policy RD4: Conversion and Re-use of Rural Buildings for Non Residential use.

11.248 Where relevant, the Council will seek the submission of a tourism supporting statement. Such a statement provides a mechanism for the applicant to demonstrate the policy alignment of the proposal.

11.249 Reference is made to Policy RD3: Farm Diversification which provides the policy framwework for farm diversification projects that seek to positively contribute to, and strengthen the rural economy.

Policy VE3: Touring Caravan, Camping and Glamping Sites

Proposals for new sites, and for extensions, improvements or the intensification of existing sites, will be permitted where they reflect and respect the role and function and sense of place of the area, as well as the following:

  1. they are of high quality in terms of design, layout and appearance, and will not have an unacceptable adverse effect upon the surrounding landscape and/or townscape;
  2. they will not result in an excessive area of hard standing, and the accommodation units can easily be removed from the site;
  3. they will not result in an over concentration of sites within the area;
  4. they are suitably located in relation to the main highway network and adequate access can be provided without detriment to the natural and built environment;
  5. the accommodation is used for touring purposes only, with occupation limited to holiday use.

Proposals which include a need for ancillary structures should demonstrate that a sequential approach has been considered, commencing with the re-use of existing buildings, followed by the need to construct new buildings.

New buildings will only be permitted where they are appropriate in terms of their siting, need and scale.

11.250 This policy recognises that appropriate high quality proposals should be supported. This recognises the need to provide a diverse accommodation offer in terms of providing a range and choice of places to stay within the County.

11.251 This policy provides for consideration of proposals for touring caravans, tents, glamping pods and units, trailer tents and motorcaravans / homes – i.e non-permanent visitor accommodation.

11.252 In responding to emerging trends within the sector, this policy also allows for the consideration of glamping accommodation units. These may not present as traditional tents and are also unlikely to fit into the statutory definition of a caravan. Glamping accommodation can include tepees, pods, yurts, wigwams etc. For such a unit to be considered as non-permanent, it should have a limited physical anchoring / connection to the ground and should be transient and low impact. The unit should be easily removable from the site. The use of concrete bases is not considered appropriate, whilst any timber platforms or decking should be capable of being easily removed from the site. The unit should provide basic holiday accommodation only – e.g. sleeping, eating and seating.

11.253 The Council will consider the use of conditions – including restricting the use to holiday accommodation only, or to limit the operational period of the site. There is an expectation that the site can be restored its original state and that any accommodation units are removed from the site when it is closed.

11.254 Whilst the non-permanent nature of proposals considered under this policy mean that they are likely to have less of an impact on the landscape and environment than static units, they must still sit satisfactorily within the landscape and/or townscape. The Council will need to be satisfied that there is no adverse impact, particularly from a landscape capacity point of view. There should be an emphasis on well screened proposals where units can be readily assimilated into the landscape without the need for excessive man made features such as hard-standing and fencing. Due regard should be given to LDP policies SP 11: Placemaking and Sustainable Places and PSD1: Sustainable and High Quality Design.

11.255 Where relevant, the Council will seek the submission of a tourism supporting statement. Such a statement provides a mechanism for the applicant to demonstrate the policy alignment of the proposal. Within the context of this policy, it is likely that the Council will seek a landscaping scheme to allow for an appraisal of setting, site layout, and screening. It will also allow the applicant to elaborate upon the economic benefits of the proposal (as commensurate with size/scale etc).

Policy VE4: Static Caravan and Chalet Sites

  1. Proposals for new Static Caravan and Chalet Sites will be permitted where:
    1. they are directly related to a defined settlement (Policy SP16), or, they are located or demonstrate a spatial and functional relationship with a relevant existing tourism facility or attraction;
    2. they are of high quality in terms of design, layout and appearance, and will not have an unacceptable adverse effect upon the surrounding landscape and/or townscape;
    3. they will not lead to a significant and unacceptable intensification in the provision of sites in the locality;
    4. they are suitably located in relation to the main highway network and adequate access can be provided.
  2. Proposals for the enhancement and extension of existing sites will be permitted where:
    1. it will increase the vitality, sustainability and environmental quality of the site;
    2. it will not result in an unacceptable increase in the density of units and/or the overall scale of the site.
    3. it will not have an unacceptable harm on the surrounding landscape and / or townscape;
    4. it provides (where appropriate) for the significant improvement of the overall quality, appearance and setting of the site.

11.256 This policy recognises that appropriate high quality proposals should be supported. This recognises the need to provide a diverse accommodation offer in terms of providing a range and choice of places to stay within the County.

11.257 The Council will consider the application of conditions – including restricting the use to holiday accommodation only and / or to limit the operational period of the site. It is likely to be on rare occasions that sites will possess those features that would allow them to stay open in the winter months.

11.258 Where appropriate, the Council will require site operators to maintain an up to date register of the names of all owner/occupiers of the static units and their main home address in order to ensure that the holiday units do not become the owner/occupier's main place of residence.

11.259 The underpinning design principle for static visitor accommodation should be high quality – notably in terms of layout and appearance. Proposals should be sited in unobtrusive locations which are suitably screened by existing landscape features and/or where the units can be readily assimilated into the landscape in a way which does not significantly harm the visual quality of the landscape, seascape or townscape. Due regard should be given to LDP policies SP 11: Placemaking and Sustainable Places and PSD1: Sustainable and High Quality Design.

11.260 The demonstration of a spatial and functional relationship with a relevant existing tourism facility or attraction should be proportionate to the size and nature of the proposal. It is considered that proposals for static holiday accommodation that are of a sporadic and unrelated nature are highly unlikely to be able to demonstrate the required relationship.

11.261 Many existing static units are located in visually sensitive areas, particularly along Carmarthenshire's coastline. The policy seeks to promote improvements and upgrade the standard of visitor accommodation on existing sites, and to reduce the impact of these sites on the landscape / seascape. Such proposals should satisfy the policies and provisions of the Plan as a whole.

11.262 The policy seeks to reflect the Well-being of Future Generations Act 2015 in that it recognises the risks posed by flood risk and /or erosion emerging from coastal change. To this end, reference should be made to LDP policy NE7: Coastal Change Management Area in terms of the potential relocation of a static caravan(s), chalet(s) or permanent other visitor accommodation unit(s).

11.263 Where relevant, the Council will seek the submission of a tourism supporting statement. Such a statement provides a mechanism for the applicant to demonstrate the policy alignment of the proposal. Within the context of this policy, it is likely that the Council will seek a landscaping scheme to allow for an appraisal of setting, site layout, and screening, as well as an improvement plan for extensions. Issues of landscape capacity are also noted. The statement should also allow the opportunity for the applicant to elaborate upon the economic benefits of the proposal (as commensurate with size/scale).


Strategic Policy – SP 11: Placemaking and Sustainable Places

In order to facilitate sustainable development, new development should acknowledge local distinctiveness and sense of place, and be designed to high standards that are adaptable to climate change.

In order to achieve this, all development should:

  1. Contribute towards the creation of attractive, cohesive, safe places and public spaces, which enhance the health and well-being or quality of life of residents and communities, including safeguarding amenity, landscaping, the public realm and the provision of open space and recreation;
  2. The design, layout and orientation of proposed building(s), and the spaces between and around them, should create an attractive, legible, healthy, accessible and safe environment;
  3. Retain and enhance the network of green infrastructure including where appropriate including incorporating new opportunities to enhance biodiversity and ecological connectivity (including the incorporation of local features);
  4. Be adaptable to climate change and maximise opportunities for sustainable construction techniques, resource efficiency and contribute towards increase low carbon and renewable energy generation.
  5. Utilise materials and resources appropriate to the area within which it is located;
  6. Exhibit and demonstrate a clear understanding of the existing natural and built heritage, local character and sense of place;
  7. Contribute to, or create opportunities for Active Travel and access to public transport;
  8. Consider and where appropriate incorporate new, and/or enhance existing connections to essential social infrastructure and community facilities;
  9. Be accessible and integrated allowing permeability and ease of movement which promotes the interests of pedestrians, cyclists and public transport which ensures ease of access for all;
  10. Have regard to the generation, treatment and disposal of waste;
  11. Manage water sustainably, including incorporating sustainable urban drainage systems (SuDS) into design of any development proposals.

11.264 Planning Policy Wales sets out the land use planning policies of the Welsh Government (WG). Its central objective is to promote and provide a framework for sustainable development within Wales.

11.265 A key component of this national policy agenda, and the sustainable development objectives which underpin it, relates to the need to embrace placemaking as part of the plan making and decision making process. National planning policy identifies Sustainable Places as the goal of the land use planning system in Wales. PPW states that; they are the output of the planning system rather than the process of achieving them. All development decisions, either through development plans policy choices or individual development management decisions should seek to contribute towards the making of sustainable places and improved well-being[24].

11.266 The WG is committed to promoting more sustainable forms of development, and their sustainable development scheme, One Wales: One Planet, (2009) sets out their approach to sustainable development. Through the planning system in Wales, good design can be used to play a major role in delivering sustainable forms of development with the Revised LDP committed to taking forward the sustainable placemaking agenda through its policies recognising the role new developments in potentially contributing to the making of places, and the areas qualities. The approach seeks to accord with the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 promoting social inclusion, equality of opportunity and access for all as well as the health and well-being of our communities.

11.267 Achieving good design and creating an effective sense of place requires an understanding of the relationship between all elements of the natural and built environment. Design is a fundamental component in creating sustainable development, which is itself at the forefront of the Well-being of Future Generations Act 2015.

11.268 The Act means that public bodies such as local authorities must work to ensure that developments should acknowledge and seek to improve the economic, social, environmental and cultural well-being of an area.

11.269 The policy integrates key elements of sustainable placemaking which contribute to the delivery of the Plan's Vision of creating prosperous, cohesive and sustainable communities. It also recognises the role that the County's unique environmental and historic and cultural qualities play in defining a healthy, safe and prosperous environment.

The role of the Green Infrastructure and its network of multifunctional open spaces is an important component as is its provisions for health and well-being and enhanced opportunities for Active Travel and promotes improved.

11.270 There are environmental, social, as well as economic benefits to creating a well-designed development. Designing a high quality environment is an essential ingredient to achieving economic prosperity as it will be more attractive to potential investors as well as being more appealing to customers, key workers and tourists. Similarly, better designed buildings and places for work will result in more productive employees. At the same time, well-designed neighbourhoods will create happier and healthier communities that will be more committed to the maintenance of their surroundings. The environmental benefits might include less pollution through the reduction in traffic, the protection or enhancement of biodiversity, and the conservation of the built heritage. All these benefits are central to achieving sustainable development and to the long term economic prosperity of an area.

11.271 This policy is intended to ensure that development proposals can achieve positive economic, social, environmental and cultural outcomes, and can minimise adverse ones. It will, along with the more detailed policies to be developed in the Deposit LDP, form the basis of all planning decisions, and indicators will be developed as part of the Plan's monitoring framework to show the effectiveness of the policies.

11.272 The Flood and Water Management Act 2010 (Schedule 3) establishes Sustainable Drainage Approval Body (SABs) and requires new developments to include Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) features that comply with national standards.

11.273 Whilst the SuDS consenting process forms part of a separate regulatory regime to planning, this Plan recognises the importance of the consideration of SuDS forming part of the design concept from the outset as part of a placemaking approach. In this regard, this Plan recognises that SuDS can be used effectively in both rural and urban areas to support new development and redevelopment, whilst reducing the risk of surface water flooding and creating opportunities for improved water quality, bio-diverse rich habitats and new community recreational spaces.

11.274 Developers are advised to contact with the Council's SAB at a timely stage in order to clarify and scope requirements. [25]


PSD1: Sustainable and High Quality Design

Development proposals shall demonstrate effective delivery of site specific design and sustainability objectives. Development shall deliver quality design solutions which are appropriate to the specific site, local area and nature of development.

Proposals shall clearly demonstrate:

  1. A positive understanding of local characteristics through consideration of: the landscape; built environment; and historic and cultural context. This should fully inform the delivery of high-quality design protecting, enhancing, and responding to the identified characteristics, including the:
    1. layout and landscape design scheme;
    2. form, scale, dimensions, materials and detailing of all built elements and surfaces.
  2. Where issues of ground instability can be satisfactorily overcome in an environmentally acceptable manner which minimises excavation and filling and utilises the existing site topography.
  3. High-quality design solutions which deliver solutions in relation to buildings and spaces and their inter-relationships, and delivers a effective, safe and inclusive site layout and efficient use of site area;
  4. That the development will not result in significant adverse impacts to the amenity of adjacent land uses, properties, residents or the community; and any potential adverse impacts have been avoided, minimised and mitigated.
  5. High-quality landscapes and built environments which:
    1. retain, protect and integrates the existing landscape, built environment, ecological and green infrastructure network
    2. enhances the visual amenity and character and creates an attractive public realm with a clear and legible sense of place.
    3. minimises potential adverse visual impacts
  6. That the development delivers or contributes to:
    1. safe and efficient connections to existing access networks including active travel and public transport network;
    2. legible access routes and surfaces which promote effective accessibility for all and ease of movement into and through the site;
    3. provision of appropriate onsite standards including parking and servicing.
  7. That the development delivers sustainable and resilient measures for the treatment and disposal of surface and foul water; which are fully integrated into the site layout and maximise opportunities for the provision of additional value through functions which deliver landscape, ecological and green infrastructure policy objectives
  8. That design solutions are deliverable for the lifetime of the proposed development.
  9. It includes, where applicable, provision for the appropriate management and eradication of invasive species

11.275 This plan and the policy seeks to ensure development proposals exhibit high quality and sustainable design principles which are reflective of the local context. High quality design sits at the heart of our ambitions for the creation of prosperous, cohesive and sustainable communities. An important part of this is putting in place a design-led regeneration approach which provides for high quality developments and designs in a way which recognises local distinctiveness, and the relationship between the existing built form and new developments.

11.276 The Plan seeks to reflect the provisions of national policy and the embedding of sustainable development within the plan recognising that new homes and developments should be provided in a way which is consistent with sustainability principles. Matters such as the layout, scale, form, massing, height, density, materials and specific detailing (including the colour pallet) are important components. However it is recognised that these cannot be prescriptive and will vary across development and the Plan area.

11.277 Creating good design should not be limited solely to the physical appearance of buildings and specific structural details alone will not create a successful place. Rather, the potential mix of uses within a development and/or buildings, spaces (including important vistas and gaps) and the wider community relate to one another are of equal importance if the development is to deliver the sense of place desired.

11.278 This policy in conjunction with SP11: Placemaking and Sustainable Places, PSD3: Green Infrastructure Network and PSD2: Masterplanning Principles – Creating Sustainable Neighbourhoods together with other plan policies set an overarching framework for high design quality in development, conservation and enhancement proposals within the County.

11.279 The County's historic buildings, townscape and landscape should be treated as an asset and positively conserved and enhanced for the benefit of residents and visitors alike. Further guidance on the development and preservation of historic and cultural identities can be found within Strategic Policy SP14.

11.280 Proposals should reflect the need to protect the qualities of the area and the amenity of those who work in, live in and visit the area. The siting and nature of uses should be considered in the light of their potential to cause an unacceptable nuisance. Considerations of amenity can relate to all forms of development across the County. Consequently, the policy seeks to respect, and where appropriate, protect the amenity of existing residents.

11.281 The siting, layout and detailed design of development will often be critically important to the success of efforts to provide genuine alternatives to car travel. Good site locations and well-designed developments can increase the sites legibility and access to pedestrian, cycling and public transport routes thus reducing the amount of car traffic and speeds. This Plan, and other strategies ensure that new developments achieve social, economic and environmental sustainability, creating cohesive and socially inclusive places which reinforce local identity.

11.282 Poor quality design can not only undermine the character, qualities and appearance of an area, but can also impact on the amenity of existing residents and their quality of life. Design solutions should consider such impacts in relation to: visual impact, loss of light, overlooking/privacy, disturbance and the likely implications of traffic movements or operational considerations.

11.283 Proposals should also consider the quality of life of potential occupants of the development. The size of living spaces is also considered important in maintaining an appropriate living standard including providing for healthy and attractive environments to live. It should be noted that such considerations will apply to conversions where there is a potential for an over intensification of use giving rise to cramped living conditions.

11.284 Design and Access Statement (DAS) should, where appropriate, be submitted to accompany planning applications. The DAS should include the detail necessary to ensure the application and the design considerations of any development are fully expressed having regard to policy provisions and their context.

11.285 Proposals for developments of over 100 homes will be required to have regard to the provisions of Policy PSD2: Masterplanning Principles – Creating Sustainable Neighbourhoods. The policy will be further expanded upon by SPG including specific guidance on Placemaking and Design Principles. Green Infrastructure and its network of multifunctional open spaces will be an integral part of any effective design solution. Consequently proposals will be expected to have appropriate regard to Policy PSD3: Green Infrastructure Network.

11.286 Natural surveillance is an important consideration in ensuring safer places and more inclusive developments and communities.

11.287 The Plan recognises that unstable land can occur for a number of reasons, albeit they often fall within the following categories:

  1. The effects of underground cavities – whether of natural origin or due to mining or civil engineering works;
  2. Unstable slopes – these may be natural (e.g. eroding coastlines) or man-made (such as quarries, cuttings or embankments) or,
  3. Ground compression – this may be of natural origin due to peat, alluvial, estuarine or marine soils; or due to human activities e.g. made ground, landfill or restored opencast mines; and ground subject to movement due to shrinking and swelling clays.

11.288 In those areas where land instability is known, development proposals must be accompanied by a scoping report, which will identify the nature of the (potential) instability. The report should be sufficiently detailed in order for the local authority and any other statutory agency to ascertain whether:

  1. there is no potential threat for a development to go ahead;
  2. instability problems cannot be overcome; or
  3. measures could be implemented to overcome identified problems. A detailed stability report will be required to accompany the application which:
    1. Is produced by a "competent person", most appropriately a geotechnical specialist able to demonstrate relevant specialist experience in the assessment and evaluation of instability; and
    2. Identifies the measures required to mitigate against the identified risk(s).

11.289 It is important that proposals are designed for the lifetime of the development. Proposals should identify maintenance responsibility, and the funding arrangements for maintenance for the lifetime of the proposed development.

PSD2: Masterplanning Principles – Creating Sustainable Neighbourhoods

For proposals where the development is for 50 homes or more, there will be a requirement to submit a comprehensive and integrated 'masterplan' for the entire site demonstrating a coherent and coordinated approach to creating neighbourhoods in accordance with placemaking and good design principles. Consideration should be given to the following guiding principles (where appropriate):

  1. A breakdown of densities across the site reflecting the physical characteristics of the site and the character and appearance of the surrounding community. Higher density developments will be expected to relate directly to public transport corridors and reflect the settlement's position within the settlement framework (Strategic Policy SP16);
  2. How they will contribute to the delivery of sustainable transport choices including active travel and accessibility to public transport;
  3. How the proposal integrates and links effectively into the surrounding community including links within and through the site for sustainable transport choices. Proposals should seek to establish good legibility and connectivity both within the site and linking to the wider area;
  4. The provision of facilities to meet the social and community needs of the development and where appropriate the wider community;
  5. Include responsive solutions reflecting the local context and the opportunities for sustainable construction techniques;
  6. Integration of the network of green infrastructure and connected open spaces in providing a cohesive and integrated environment for people, wildlife and open spaces for sports, recreation and play;
  7. Sympathetic integration of landscape form, biodiversity and built and historic features within and surrounding the site into the development. Proposals will be expected to look outwards beyond the site boundary (and not just within the site) in delivering high quality sustainable neighbourhoods;
  8. A phasing plan for the delivery of the development along with timely provision of supporting infrastructure;
  9. Reflect the linguistic and cultural identity of the County and contribute towards safeguarding and promoting the Welsh language;
  10. Include innovative and creative solutions in relation to resource efficiency, low carbon development and renewable energy generation;
  11. Integrate site features arising from SUD's as part of the development and consider the additional value or functions which these may provide.

11.290 The policy sets out a masterplanning as a requirement for developments in delivering a holistic placemaking approach for all allocated and windfall sites of 50 or more homes. A masterplan for all sites allocated for 50 homes or more will need to be agreed prior to granting planning permission relating to these sites.

11.291 The policy recognises the benefits that can arise from effective masterplanning not only in terms of the quality of environment and sense of place it can create, but also as an opportunity to integrate all the relevant developmental considerations and requirements into a single expression of the proposals form.

11.292 Utilising this approach proposals will be able to express in a clear and coherent way how factors such as the new, or enhancement of existing, infrastructure an add value to existing and future residents, forming and guiding future provision. Such an approach will provide greater certainty and integrate opportunities for a connected living, legible streets, a sequence of open spaces and Green Infrastructure and developments that fit their surroundings.

11.293 Masterplanning proposals should consider and plan for the effective and integrated phasing of the development taking into account different tenure mixes and the suitable provision of facilities at appropriate stages in a sites development. This will ensure a development is comprehensively planned with cohesive and sustainable communities at their heart.

11.294 The masterplan should be considered at outline planning application stage with its parameters and content agreed, to which a future reserved matters applications should accord.

PSD3: Green Infrastructure Network

Development proposals will be required to integrate, protect and maintain existing GI assets and to enhance the extent, quality, connectivity and multi-functionality of the green infrastructure network. Where the loss or damage of existing green infrastructure is unavoidable, appropriate mitigation and compensation will be required.

All developments should seek to maximise as far as practicable, the amount of green infrastructure on the site, as well as the interconnectedness of green infrastructure within and around the site to the wider green infrastructure network. They should also take opportunities to achieve multi-functionality by bringing green infrastructure functions together.

All major developments will be required to submit a Green Infrastructure Assessment.

11.295 This policy aims to ensure that Carmarthenshire's green infrastructure assets are valued, protected, enhanced and managed through a green infrastructure network. At the landscape scale green infrastructure assets can comprise entire ecosystems such as wetlands, woodlands, heathlands and waterways. At a local scale, it might comprise of parks, fields, footpaths, Public Rights of Way, cycle ways, common land, open access land, canals, allotments, cemeteries, landscaped areas and gardens. At smaller scales, individual urban interventions such as street trees, roadside verges, and green roofs can all contribute to green infrastructure networks.

11.296 Green Infrastructure Assessment will be required to demonstrate:

  1. the location, quality and condition of all existing GI assets and landscape and ecological elements and features on, and adjacent to the site, and those subject to:
    1. potential impacts from the development, and details of how the impacts have been avoided and minimised through specific design and protection measures.
    2. unavoidable impacts from the development, and details of how the impacts have been mitigated, or compensated for within the proposed development layout and landscape design scheme;
  2. effective design solutions which maximise opportunities to: enhance the quality and extent of existing; and enable the creation of new GI assets and landscape and ecological elements and features, to enhance the connectivity and multi-functionality of the GI network

11.297 When appropriately planned, designed and managed, green infrastructure has the potential to deliver a wide range of benefits for people and wildlife. By considering the multiple functions that a GI asset can provide simultaneously, it can significantly reduce costs for individuals, businesses and public bodies, whilst enhancing the quality of life and health of residents, workers and visitors to Carmarthenshire.

11.298 These functions that green infrastructure can provide fit broadly under the following themes:

output

Figure 11: Green Infrastructure

Biodiversity: GI can improve connectivity between existing areas of nature, reducing habitat fragmentation and loss and increasing ecological resilience. Development proposals will conserve and enhance on-site biodiversity, and habitat networks within and adjacent to the site. This should include identifying ways to minimise or reverse the fragmentation of habitats, and to improve habitat connectivity through the promotion of wildlife corridors and identifying opportunities for land rehabilitation, landscape management and the creation of new or improved habitats.

Sense of place: Incorporating GI features into new development is an important component of the WG placemaking approach and can contribute to the unique sense of place of an area or settlement. Retaining existing features into proposals helps to create places that are distinct and can help to soften the impact of change by creating a sense of continuity that acknowledges local identity. Green infrastructure is integral to place-making and therefore must be part of the development design process from the outset, rather than being relegated to 'left over' land.

Climate Change: GI can play a vital part in efforts to combat, mitigate and adapt to climate change, and will play an increasingly important role in climate-proofing both urban and rural areas. Increasing the green cover of our towns and cities can provide a number of benefits towards tackling climate change. These include carbon sequestration and storage, heat amelioration and reduction of flood risk as well as mitigating climate change induced reductions in air and water quality. Development should as far as possible seek to maximise these benefits, with prioritisation of benefits to be considered in the following areas:

  • Within flood zones as identified by Natural Resources Wales, the provision of capacity for water storage in the event of a flood
  • Within the Principle Centres, the provision of relief from high temperatures through increased canopy cover and efficient use of surfaces to maximise the provision of green infrastructure including through green roofs and green walls.
  • Within areas of poor average resident health, the provision of opportunities for physical activity.
  • Within Air Quality Management Zones, the provision of removal of air pollutants through suitable tree and foliage planting.

Development proposals will also integrate naturalised SuDS into the design of green infrastructure, and should as far as possible, ensure that SuDS provision is multifunctional.

Health and Well-being: Green infrastructure can be an effective means of enhancing health and well‑being, through linking dwellings, workplaces and community facilities and providing high quality, accessible green spaces. Development should seek to maximise the benefits, and where appropriate public use, of green infrastructure, with emphasis on promoting healthier communities. Development proposals will meet local accessibility, quality and quantity standards for open space, and be designed to cater for the needs of the community. Development proposals will maintain and enhance the quality and connectivity of access networks, integrating active travel routes (linking workplaces, schools, community facilities and public transport hubs) and recreation routes into green infrastructure.

Economy: Protecting and investing in GI can support economic success and sustainable growth. GI can attract inward investment, making a local area more attractive to businesses and visitors. It can also save developers money as GI assets have the potential to satisfy a number of requirements in a multifunctional solution e.g. open space and SuDS. To this end development should seek to identify and maximise the quality, use and multifunctionality of green infrastructure provision on site.

11.299 Consequently further guidance on Green Infrastructure as part of development will be prepared as SPG in support of the placemaking agenda and the creation of high quality and biodiverse living environments.

PSD4: Green Infrastructure – Trees, Woodlands and Hedgerows

Proposals for development should retain and extend tree cover where important to the amenity, natural environment and the built form. Proposals should retain existing trees, woodland and hedgerows and, where loss is unavoidable provide appropriate replacement throughout the development.

Where there is an unavoidable loss of trees on site, replacement trees will be required to be planted on site at a rate of two new trees for each tree lost. The planting of new, additional trees is also supported and encouraged as part of new developments.

Development proposals will not be permitted where they have an adverse impact on trees, woodlands and hedgerows which are:

  1. Protected by a Tree Preservation Order (TPO);
  2. Ancient woodlands including individual ancient and veteran trees;
  3. Important to the setting and character of a conservation area.

Tree survey information should be submitted with all planning applications, where trees are present on site. The tree survey information should include protection, mitigation and management measures.

11.300 The policy recognises the important contribution trees, woodlands and hedgerows can have to the environment and to our communities. Trees and woodlands play an important role within the plan area and are intrinsic to the landscape and urban character whilst providing habitat and increasing climate change resilience.

11.301 Their contribution within the urban form is particularly recognised. They help to trap air pollutants, provide shading, absorb rainwater and filter noise. They also provide extensive areas of habitat for wildlife, especially mature trees. Carmarthenshire's Green infrastructure network reflects tier importance in the urban realm and within our towns and villages - in both public and private spaces, along linear routes and waterways, and in amenity areas.

11.302 We consider their retention and additional new planting to be an important part in creating a cohesive and healthy communities within a valued and biodiverse rural and landscape context. All planning applications should be accompanied by a tree survey where trees are present on site. This should include protection, mitigation and management measures. Appropriate management measures must be implemented to protect newly planted and existing trees, woodlands and/ or hedgerows.

11.303 The policy reflects the links through quality placemaking and Green Infrastructure. Consequently further guidance on Trees and planting as part of new developments will be prepared as SPG in support of the placemaking agenda and the creation of high quality and biodiverse living environments.

11.304 New trees planted should be of a species native to, and of a maturity respective to the site to the Council's satisfaction.

PSD5: Development and the Circular Economy

Development proposals will be required to demonstrate, via the submission of a natural materials management plan, how the generation of waste has been minimised and any waste generated managed in order to keep resources in use for as long as possible in:

  1. the layout and design of the development;
  2. any demolition and construction phase;
  3. respect of any opportunities for utilising waste for re-use and recycling;
  4. respect of any opportunities for utilising residual waste as a source of fuel.

11.305 A key element within PPW Ed10 is the move towards embracing a more circular economy in Wales. A circular economy is one which aims to keep materials, products and components in use for as long as possible. There are environmental, social and economic benefits of taking such an approach, most notably the increased value and productivity of materials, financial savings for the construction sector and the prevention of waste.

11.306 In order to facilitate the requirements of this policy, development proposals will need to be accompanied by a natural materials management plan. The Plan should identify all the natural materials on the site prior to the development, these may be existing buildings to be demolished or the natural ground to be disturbed. It should explain how the generation of waste from these materials will be minimised and that the design and layout has given full consideration to ensuring that a cut and fill balance is as close to neutral as possible.

11.307 Development proposals will be encouraged that incorporate design features and materials which enable flexibility and adaptability throughout the design life of a building and which will enable re-use of the materials upon deconstruction.

11.308 Where appropriate, the use of locally sourced, alternative or recycled materials will be encouraged, including the reuse and recycling of secondary aggregates, construction, demolition and excavation waste, incinerator bottom ash and other appropriate recycled materials.

11.309 Construction sites inevitably require a degree of cut and fill engineering operations. As part of site treatment, the cut and fill balance of materials excavated should be assessed so as to avoid the creation of waste which cannot be effectively re-used due to lack of suitable storage facilities. As part of the natural resources management plan developers should design proposals to achieve an earthwork balance which seeks to minimise cut and fill or which may provide for remediation of land elsewhere in the area.

11.310 The Planning Authority will encourage innovative approaches to recycling, particularly those which bring multiple benefits such as reducing energy costs and associated emissions. This may include the practice of on‑site recycling on minerals sites and the recycling of construction and demolition waste in conjunction with other suitable uses, such as within builder's merchant yards.

11.311 In circumstances where reuse or recycling of the waste is not possible, the applicant will need to provide evidence to show where the residual waste will be disposed. Options that will be encouraged include the potential for utilising the waste as a source of fuel, such as in high efficiency energy recovery from waste, possibly linked to district heating systems.

PSD6: Community Facilities

Proposals for new and improved community facilities, including health and education facilities will be supported where it accords with the following:

  1. It would be readily accessible to the local community it is intended to serve by public transport, walking and cycling;
  2. It is within, or is directly related to a settlement identified in Policy SP16: Sustainable Distribution;
  3. It would not unduly harm the amenities nearby residential properties;
  4. It would not detract from the character and appearance of the area;
  5. It will not lead to unacceptable parking or traffic problems;
  6. It is designed with appropriate flexibility and adaptability to accommodate additional community uses without compromising its primary intended use.

11.312 Providing a range of community facilities that are accessible to as many people as possible is fundamental in terms of securing sustainable communities. Such facilities are valuable not only in terms of the amenity they provide, but are also important in generating employment and attracting people to live within an area. Community facilities contribute significantly to the well-being, quality of life, enjoyment and inclusivity of settlements and communities within the County. In this regard, their potential loss should be carefully considered given consequential impacts in terms of sustainability and community identity. The protection and retention of community facilities should, wherever feasible, be considered and responsive approaches adopted to assist in their retention.

11.313 The above policy also recognises the potential for development where it occurs to place a strain on existing facilities. Consequently, the adequacy of existing facilities such as healthcare is an important consideration. As a result, the policy seeks to ensure that adequate facilities are provided to meet the future demands of local communities.

11.314 The policy seeks to encourage the potential for dual use of facilities, particularly where the additional activity would assist in broadening service delivery and enhancing viability and usage. Establishing the viability of a facility, within the context of changing demographic characteristics, condition and maintenance and shifting patterns of demand may mean that some facilities no longer meet requirements. In such circumstances, alternative forms of provision and usage may be appropriate. Such a determination should be informed, where appropriate, by local evidence, the facility/service provider and the local community.

11.315 The promotion of accessibility to formal and informal recreation and leisure is an important consideration for the LDP. Sports fields, allotments, parks and wider natural based amenities such as waterways and woodlands provide opportunities for potential health benefits and add to a community's sense of place, as well as integrating green infrastructure into the urban form.

11.316 They also have potential to mitigate against the causes and effects of climate change, and can provide arenas for social interaction and community cohesion. Reference should be made to policy PSD7 in respect of Recreation and Open Space.

11.317 The relationship between the access to healthcare facilities and new development is recognised and reference should be had to Policy INF2: Healthy Communities.

11.318 The provision of community facilities will be supported where they accord with Strategic Policy SP16: Sustainable Distribution Settlement Framework. The siting of proposals for the provision of new educational and health facilities will be supported on sites within and immediately adjacent to the limits of defined settlements where they are in accordance with the strategy and policies of this LDP.

11.319 The Council may seek developer contributions through planning obligations to mitigate the impacts of particular developments, and to facilitate the delivery of the Plan polices and proposals.

PSD7: Protection of Open Space

Provision will be made to protect and wherever possible enhance accessibility to open space.

Proposals which result in the loss of existing open space will only be permitted where:

  1. It is demonstrated that there is provision of at least equivalent value available within the settlement, or appropriately accessible location; and,
  2. It would not cause or exacerbate a deficiency of open space; or,
  3. The re-development of a small part of the site would allow for the retention and improvement of the majority of the facility; or,
  4. A satisfactory financial contribution towards compensatory provision is provided as an acceptable alternative facility.

11.320 Definitions of open space and a clarification of the County's accessibility standards are provided within the Carmarthenshire Open Space Assessment with additional information also provided in the Carmarthenshire Green Infrastructure Assessment. For the purposes of this Plan, open space is defined as areas including playing fields, equipped children's play areas, outdoor sports facilities, informal recreation and amenity or play space (i.e. natural green space, play space and public open space).

11.321 The identified open space provision in the County is mapped and assessed within the Carmarthenshire Open Space Assessment. It should however be noted that there may be additional areas of open space which are not reflected in the Assessment which make a valuable contribution towards the provision of open space within the community. Whilst these areas are not mapped as part of the LDP, they would nevertheless be afforded protection under this policy where considered appropriate.

11.322 Whilst the protection of existing open space is a key aspect of the above policy, it also provides a measure of flexibility. The consideration of changing demographic characteristics, the condition and vitality of existing provision, and any shifting patterns in need may mean that existing open space is no longer meeting requirements. There may be a surplus of provision identified or there may be scope to improve the existing provision to meet the local community's needs through development. In such circumstances, the policy seeks to allow for the enhancement or alteration of provision within the settlement as and where appropriate.

11.323 Where proposals have the potential to materially and adversely impact upon existing provision, the applicant will need to demonstrate that alternative provision is available to achieve the accessibility standards. The Open Space Assessment should be referred to for this purpose; the amount, location and type of open space should all be factored into the identification of alternative provision of 'equivalent value'. With regards to the changing patterns in need and use, consideration should be given to consulting with the Sports Council for Wales, alongside the Council's Leisure and Parks Services, the relevant Town and Community Councils, as well as other service providers and organisations with responsibility for the provision and maintenance of open space in the locality. It should be noted that it will be the responsibility of the applicant to provide sufficient information to demonstrate a proposal's compliance with this policy.

11.324 These open spaces make an important contribution to the Green Infrastructure of the County by providing areas for recreation, reducing the impact of climate change, improving health and well-being and enhancing biodiversity and connectivity, amongst other benefits. Regard should be had to Policy PSD3: Green Infrastructure Network and the need to maximise the amount of green infrastructure within a site and to achieve multi-functionality by bringing green infrastructure functions together.

PSD8: Provision of New Open Space

All new residential developments of ten or more homes will be required to contribute towards open space in accordance with the Council's open space standards.

In the event that the standards cannot be met on site, or where there is sufficient existing provision already available to service the development, then a commuted sum will be sought where appropriate.

11.325 The Carmarthenshire Open Space Assessment sets out the current provision of open space across the Plan area and the standards which the Council and developers should aim to deliver. This policy provides the means to achieve these standards which take into consideration the quantity, function and accessibility of provision. Further detail is outlined in the Open Space Assessment.

11.326 In determining whether or not there is a need for a contribution, the quantity, accessibility, quality and type of open space provision will need to be considered. Where there is an existing deficiency within a community and the proposed development is likely to exacerbate the situation then a contribution will be required. Equally, a contribution will be required in circumstances where the proposed development would result in a deficiency.

11.327 With regards the Natural Greenspace, Play Space and Public Open Space provision, the Council applies the following standards:

Natural Greenspace

  1. No person should live more than 400m1 from their nearest area of Natural Greenspace (of at least 0.5ha).
  2. There should be at least one Natural Greenspace of 20ha or more, within 2km of every home.
  3. There should be at least one Natural Greenspace site of 100ha or more, within 5km of every home.
  4. There should be at least one Natural Greenspace site of 500ha or more, within 10km of every home.
  5. There should be at least 2ha of Natural Greenspace for every 1000 of population.

Play Space

  1. There should be at least 2.4ha of Play Space for every 1000 of population
  2. At least 1.6ha of the 2.4ha should be Outdoor Sports Facilities
  3. At least 0.8ha of the 2.4ha should be Children's Play Facilities
  4. Everybody should live within 1,200m of Outdoor Sports Facilities
  5. Everybody should live within 400m2 of Children's Play Facilities

Public Open Space

  1. There should be at least 0.8ha of Parks and Gardens for every 1000 of population
  2. There should be at least 0.6ha of Amenity Green Space for every 1000 of population
  3. Everybody should be within 700m of a Park or formal Garden
  4. Everybody should be within 480m of an Amenity Greenspace

11.328 In addition to the quantitative and accessibility standards, regard should be had to the quality of the existing provision, taking into consideration its condition, its requirements for future maintenance and its suitability for all members of the community.

11.329 In situations where the standards can be met by existing open space provision which is of a suitable quality then a supporting statement will be required from the applicant to evidence this. In such circumstances, the Council may seek a commuted sum towards the maintenance or upgrade of existing nearby open space provision where considered necessary.

11.330 There may be situations where the standards cannot be met, for example, where the site cannot practically accommodate onsite provision of open space due to physical or design constraints, or where it would render the development wholly unviable. In such circumstances a supporting statement should be provided by the developer to clarify why the standards cannot be adhered to on site and the Local Planning Authority may seek commuted sums towards the maintenance of existing open space instead. Reference should be made to Policy INF1 with regards to planning obligations and developer contributions.

11.331 It is acknowledged that there may be additional areas of open space which are not reflected in the Assessment which make a valuable contribution towards the provision of open space within the community, this may be particularly applicable to areas of informal recreation use. Additionally, it is acknowledged that whilst open space areas have been categorised as specific types of provision they are on occasions capable of meeting the function of other types of open space. Under such circumstances, they may be considered as making a positive contribution towards multiple types of open space.

11.332 Where open space provision forms part of a planning application, the applicant should stipulate how the future management and maintenance of any open space provision has been taken into account. Reference should be made to Policy PSD1 for further guidance.

PSD9: Advertisements

Proposals for advertisements (which are subject to planning control) will be strictly controlled and will be expected to comply with the following:

  1. That their design, scale, materials and siting have full regard to the building, structure or land on which they are displayed;
  2. There are no adverse effects on the landscape / townscape, or the setting and integrity of the historic environment;
  3. That they do not constitute a hazard to public safety especially when sited on roads;
  4. That they safeguard, and positively enhance the Welsh language in the County by providing bilingual signage. Regard should also be had to the provisions of Policy SP7 - The Welsh Language.

Proposals for poster hoardings and advertisement signs should not lead to the proliferation or concentration of individually acceptable signs within the countryside.

New developments and streets will be expected to have Welsh names.

11.333 In order to promote the cultural identity of the Plan area, the Council will support and promote the provision of Welsh and English bilingual information signs, notice and information boards, displays and advertisement signs for tourist attractions and facilities. Private developers of tourism and leisure facilities will also be encouraged to publicise their business ventures through both the Welsh and English languages. Advertisements will not be required to provide the branding or company name bilingually, however, all ancillary or additional wording provided on signage in the public domain proposed in a planning application will required to be provided bilingually.

11.334 Bilingual signage and advertisement proposals which seek to combine several essential advertisements within one sign will be encouraged.

PSD10: Extensions

Proposals for the extension of existing residential dwellings / use class C3 (which require planning permission) whether buildings, other structures or a particular land use must comply with the following:

  1. The scale of the proposed extension is subordinate, or compatible to the size, type and character of the existing development, and does not result in over development of the site, nor lead to reduced and inadequate areas of parking, utility, vehicle turning, amenity or garden space;
  2. The external appearance (including materials used) of the proposed extension in terms of design is sympathetic and complementary to that of the existing development;
  3. There are no adverse effects on the natural environment, landscape/townscape or the setting and integrity of the historic environment;
  4. It promote the principles of placemaking as set out within policy SP11;
  5. The local environment and the amenities of neighbouring developments are not adversely affected by the proposed extension;
  6. The use to be made of the proposed extension is compatible with the existing building, structure or land use.

11.335 Proposals should be of a high standard of design and respectful in terms of siting, size and the use of materials to complement the character and appearance of the existing building or structure and its surroundings and appropriate to the use of the existing building.

11.336 To ensure that where the existing development is of a poor design, the Council will require that any extension is of a higher quality design and/ or materials. Regard should be had to the provisions of Policy SP11: Placemaking and Sustainable Places and PSD1: Sustainable and High Quality Design.

PSD11: Noise Pollution

Proposals that will lead to a detrimental impact from noise pollution will be permitted where it can be demonstrated that appropriate mitigation measures will be implemented, and incorporated into the development to minimise the adverse effects.

Noise sensitive developments will be permitted where they will not be adversely impacted by existing noise generating uses.

11.337 The concept of soundscapes recognises the positive role that they play in creating a sense of place, rather than solely focusing on noise as a form of pollution.[26]

11.338 The emphasis should be on considering the potential impact of soundscapes on proposed developments (and in turn the potential impact of proposed developments on soundscapes) at an early stage. To this end, this Plan places an emphasis on stakeholders giving due consideration to these matters as an integral part of the design process from the outset. As such, these matters should not be seen as 'technical' considerations that are considered separately or an 'add on' later on in the design evolution / planning application.

11.339 This Plan embraces the agent of change principle embedded into national policy[27]. To this end, this Plan recognises the importance of the change inceptor considering the potential impact of the development proposal on change receptors.

11.340 In noting the potential economic benefit of night-time economy related proposals, the health and well-being of local residents should not be unduly compromised. A placemaking approach, which seeks to build consensus at an early stage, can provide a means to mediate these potentially conflicting interests.

11.341 Furthermore, noise sensitive developments such as housing, schools, and hospitals located near to transport infrastructure should, wherever possible, be designed to limit noise levels within, and around the development.[28] Where appropriate, effective and appropriate mitigation should be implemented, and incorporated into the development to minimise the effects.

11.342 Green infrastructure can be an effective means of enhancing health and well‑being, through linking dwellings, workplaces and community facilities and providing high quality, accessible green spaces. Reference should be made to Policy PSD3: Green Infrastructure Networks.

11.343 Changes to soundscapes can also have impacts on species sensitive to noise disturbance. As always, proposals should satisfy the policies and provisions of the Plan as a whole. Specific reference may be made however to Strategic Policy 13 –Maintaining and Enhancing the Natural Environment (most notably in relation to sites of international importance to nature conservation).

PSD12: Light and Air Pollution

Proposals that will lead to a detrimental impact from light and / or air pollution will be permitted where it can be demonstrated that appropriate mitigation measures will be implemented, and incorporated into the development to minimise the adverse effects.

Light

11.344 National policy recognises the negative impacts that light pollution can have on people, biodiversity and ecosystem resilience. In this respect PPW requires that authorities adopt policies in respect of lighting and the control of light pollution[29].

11.345 Parts of Carmarthenshire are still relatively undeveloped with a limited impact from lighting on the night sky. In interpreting this policy, any lighting should be carefully designed and considered to minimise the impact on adjoining areas. Reference should also be made to the Wales Tranquil Areas Map, 2009.

11.346 In all development, (and in public spaces especially) there should be sensitive management of light, and exposure to airborne pollution should be kept as low as reasonably practicable.

11.347 Light pollution can have negative impacts on species that are particularly sensitive to disturbance. Likewise, many species and habitats can be sensitive to air pollution. As always, proposals should satisfy the policies and provisions of the Plan as a whole. Specific reference may be made however to Strategic Policy 13 –Maintaining and Enhancing the Natural Environment (most notably in relation to sites of international importance to nature conservation).

11.348 There are particular opportunities to acknowledge and embrace green infrastructure as part of a placemaking approach. In this regard, reference should be made to Policy PSD3: Green Infrastructure Networks.

Air

11.349 Air quality and its environmental, health and quality of life implications are recognised through national guidance.[30] This is also reflected within the Sustainability Appraisal objectives and the HRA screening report.

11.350 Whilst air quality in general within the County is good, there are three designated Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs) – one in Llandeilo, one in Llanelli and one in Carmarthen. Reference may be made to the Council's Action Plan(s), whilst the boundaries of these AQMA's are shown on this Plan's Constraints Map.

11.351 Developers should be aware of the importance of early engagement with the Council, particularly in terms of the potential requirement for the undertaking of an Air Quality Assessment. Whilst this Plan is not prescriptive in relation to the instances that such an assessment will be required, it is considered that the scale and location of the proposal are key determinants in this regard.

11.352 Any Air Quality Assessment should highlight the required mitigation so that any risks to amenity, biodiversity and health are suitably mediated. The identification of such mitigation should seek to reflect the opportunities provided by green infrastructure as part of a placemaking approach. Reference should be made to Policy PSD3: Green Infrastructure Networks.

11.353 It should be noted that the potential requirement for the undertaking of an Air Quality Assessment is not limited to sites within or adjacent to the County's AQMA's. Proposals will be subject to consideration on a case by case basis, however for proposals situated within the AQMAs the Council's Development Management Officers are likely to consult with the Council's Environmental Health Practitioners on a routine basis. Timely engagement with the Council is advised and relevant guidance referred to as appropriate.

11.354 This Plan recognises the potential inter-relationship between air quality and the integrity of the County's sites of international importance to nature conservation. Many of these sites feature habitats that are sensitive to declining air quality.

11.355 As always, proposals should satisfy the policies and provisions of the Plan as a whole. Specific reference may be made however to Strategic Policy 13 –Maintaining and Enhancing the Natural Environment (most notably in relation to sites of international importance to nature conservation) as well as Policy INF 2 - Healthy Communities. There are particular opportunities to acknowledge and embrace green infrastructure as part of a placemaking approach. In this regard, reference should be made to Policy PSD3: Green Infrastructure Networks.

PSD13: Contaminated Land

Proposals will be permitted where it is demonstrated that any actual or potential risks can be suitably mitigated so that there is no residual adverse impact upon human health and the environment.

11.356 Carmarthenshire has a rich and diverse industrial legacy, including a wide range of industries such as mining, tin plate manufacturing, gas works, and tanneries.. All of these processes have the potential to have caused contamination of the ground, ground waters or other sensitive receptors. The Council has identified a number of sites where there is a potential for contamination to remain, or where there is no evidence to confirm that adequate remediation has taken place. In these areas, further investigation may be necessary. It is understood at the time of writing that a Contaminated Land Inspection Strategy is in the process of being reviewed and updated by the Council.

11.357 The Council has a responsibility to identify contaminated land and ensure that it is managed in an appropriate manner, as set out in the Environmental Protection Act 1990.

11.358 The Council will need to be satisfied that the risks in respect of the proposed development site are fully understood and that remediation to the necessary standards is achievable[31]. Work should not commence on site until appropriate remediation has been completed. The potential impacts on historic and natural environments will be considered in determining any proposal, with any submission to be accompanied by appropriate information.

11.359 Contaminated land is defined under the Environmental Protection Act 1990 Section 78A(2) as: 'Any land which appears to the local authority in whose area it is situated to be in such a condition, by reason of substances in, on or under the land, that

  • significant harm is being caused or there is a significant possibility of such harm being caused; or
  • pollution of controlled waters is being, or is likely to be, caused.'

11.360 Where applicable, due consideration will be given to the impact of any remediation operation on natural and historic environments with the relative benefits and need for the proposal weighed against the relative importance of the historic or natural interest of the site.

11.361 Timely engagement with the Council is advised in identifying any requirements as part of development proposals, both in terms of identifying risk and control / mitigation measures.


Healthy Habits - People have a good quality of life, and make healthy choices about their lives and environment.

11.362 Whilst it is recognised that there is an overlap between the themes and the assignment of policies the following having been identified under this theme:

  • Strategic Policy – SP 12: Rural Development
  • Strategic Policy – SP 13: Maintaining and Enhancing the Natural Environment
  • Strategic Policy – SP 14: Protection and Enhancement of the Built and Historic Environment

11.363 The following policies seek to support the delivery of the Plan's strategic objectives, but also provide high level links and broad conformity with the Well-Being Goals.

Strategic Policy – SP 12: Rural Development

The Plan supports development proposals which will contribute towards the sustainability of the County's rural communities. Development proposals in rural areas should demonstrate that they support the role of the rural settlements in the settlement hierarchy to meet the housing, employment and social needs of Carmarthenshire's rural communities.

Development proposals in the countryside beyond identified settlements will be supported where it accords with the policies of this Plan.

11.364 The rural settlements of the County have an important role to play in improving the sustainability of the wider geographical area in which they are located as well as the County's overall sustainability. The Plan's strategy and settlement hierarchy reflects the significant role which the rural communities play through supporting growth of a proportionate scale which can make a positive contribution towards the long-term sustainability of the rural economy and rural communities.

11.365 Proportionate and sensitive development can provide the level of growth required to retain and enhance the services and facilities provided in the County's rural settlements. It can also serve to safeguard and promote the Welsh language in rural areas and enhance rural employment opportunities. However, the Plan seeks to ensure that development and growth does not have negative impacts upon a community's sustainability. Key to this is ensuring that development is not permitted at a scale or rate which would affect the community's ability to absorb and adapt to growth and change. This is imperative when considering the impacts which development can have upon the local infrastructure, the vitality of the Welsh language and the sustainability of the countryside and natural environment.

11.366 National planning policy has historically sought to restrict unnecessary development in countryside locations, principally to prevent sporadic and unsustainable growth and to maximise use of infrastructure, resources and services more commonly available in established urban areas.

11.367 Whilst this principle remains relevant and applicable, there is an enhanced recognition of the countryside as a place of work, as a home for many, a place to visit for others and a vital ecosystem for everyone. The Plan is committed to addressing and safeguarding the needs of rural communities. To this end the Council established a Rural Affairs Task Group with the aim of assessing the needs of rural communities and taking positive steps to address these. This Plan supports the aims of the Task Group principally through policies relating to the provision of housing and affordable housing; the economy and employment; the Welsh language and the natural environment. Development proposals will need to demonstrate that they accord with these policies as well as the provisions of national planning policy.

11.368 PPW Ed.10 recognises that the countryside is a dynamic and multi-purpose resource. It identifies that in line with sustainable development and the national planning principles it should be preserved and where possible enhanced. However, it also reflects the need to balance this against the economic, social and recreational needs of local communities and visitors.

11.369 PPW identifies that fostering adaptability and resilience will be a key aim for rural places in the face of the considerable challenge of maintaining the vibrancy of communities and availability of services as well as contributing to the Cohesive Communities national well-being goal.

11.370 There is a clear recognition that rural areas exhibit challenges in relation to access to sustainable means of transport and the expectation of PPW in relation to access to active travel connections and sustainable functional linkages. This is reflected in the development of the settlement hierarchy as a whole.

11.371 This understanding of diversity is reflected within PPW in its consideration of sustainable transport requirements. Para 4.1.16 recognises there is a need to reflect different approaches to sustainable transport in defining growth within rural settlements.

11.372 This Revised LDP recognises the diversity that exists within the County and the need to reflect this in its strategic approach. The Spatial Strategy identifies a settlement hierarchy but sets it within a settlement framework grouped under six clusters. These, and the distribution of growth will focus on sustainable principles, but will also recognise the respective role, function and contribution of settlements within particular clusters.

The Rural Economy

11.373 National policy recognises that a strong rural economy is essential to support sustainable and vibrant rural communities. In this respect the establishment of new enterprises and the expansion of existing business is crucial to the growth and stability of rural areas.

11.374 Regard should be had to the impact of such developments, however as noted within PPW, many commercial and light manufacturing activities can be located in rural areas without causing unacceptable disturbance or other adverse effects.

11.375 Whilst there remains a focus on the identification or allocation of sites to meet an employment need it is also recognised that opportunities will also be required for small scale proposals where the need is not met by a specific allocations. These small-scale enterprises are an important contributor to the rural economy.

11.376 Reference should be had to the provisions of policy SP6 and its expression of the sustainable distribution of employment land provision.

Rural Enterprise Dwellings

11.377 As noted through national policy a rural enterprise dwelling is required where it 'is to enable rural enterprise workers to live at or close to their place of work'. This includes encouraging younger people to manage farm businesses and supporting the diversification of established farms.

11.378 It is not the role or intention of the Revised LDP to replicate the provisions of national planning policy. Consequently reference should be had to the provisions of PPW and Technical Advice Note 6 (TAN6)[32] in the determination of applications for new rural enterprise dwellings. National policy clearly states that such proposals should be carefully examined to ensure that there is a genuine need.

11.379 Applications for rural enterprise dwellings should be accompanied by a rural enterprise dwelling appraisal, with permission only granted where it provides conclusive evidence of the need for the dwelling.

11.380 In order to ensure that rural enterprise dwellings are retained for their intended purpose PPW para 4.2.37 requires that a condition restricting the occupancy of the property must be applied and that the dwelling be classified as affordable housing (definition as set out within TAN 2: Planning and Affordable Housing). Where appropriate consideration will also be given to the use of a legal agreement (section 106) as a means of retaining the property's purpose as an Enterprise Dwelling. This will ensure that the dwelling remains available to meet local affordable housing need should its original justification cease.

11.381 In circumstances where a planning application is received to lift existing agricultural occupancy conditions or where enforcement action is being taken for non-compliance with the condition, consideration will be given to the replacement of an agricultural occupancy condition with the rural enterprise dwelling condition set out in TAN6: Planning for Sustainable Rural Communities[33].

11.382 Proposals for One Planet Developments in the countryside will be required to provide for the occupants minimum needs in terms of income, food, energy and waste assimilation over a period of 5 years[34]. Any proposal should be supported by an evidenced management plan, in those instances where this cannot be demonstrated any proposal will be considered against the policies and provisions of this LDP and national policy in relation to developments in the countryside. Reference will be had to the provisions of TAN6 and with regard to the requirements of the One Planet Development Practice Guide[35].

11.383 In assessing the suitability of a site for a One Planet Development, the applicant will be expected to have regard to its potential landscape and biodiversity impact, the ability to be effectively screened as well as being sufficiently near to Active Travel Routes or public transport.

RD1: Replacement Dwelling in the Open Countryside

Proposals for the replacement of existing dwellings in the countryside will be permitted provided that:

  1. the existing dwelling is not a traditional farmhouse, cottage or other building that is important to the visual and intrinsic character of the landscape;
  2. the original dwelling has not been demolished, abandoned or fallen into a state of disrepair and no longer has the appearance of a dwelling;
  3. the design of the replacement dwelling is of a form, bulk, size and scale that respects its location and setting;
  4. the proposal does not require an unacceptable extension to the existing established residential garden area;

Proposals for any outbuildings should be modest in size and sensitively located and that adequate ancillary garage and storage space can be achieved for the dwelling.

Proposals in relation to the replacement of a traditional farmhouse, cottage or other building subject to the provisions of criterion a) above will only be permitted where, the applicant provides sufficient evidence to demonstrate that the re-use of the building is not economically viable or that it is of a structural condition that precludes its effective re-use.

11.384 The policy recognises and reflects the rural character of the County and the range and condition of the housing stock. It seeks to provide opportunity and scope for the provision of replacement dwellings in a manner which ensures that the County retains its traditional character, whilst also not detracting from the special qualities of rural Carmarthenshire.

11.385 Specific consideration should be given to the acceptability of a proposals' visual impact on the landscape. In this respect, its scale and design (including the extent of the residential curtilage) should not be to the detriment of the character and quality of the area.

RD2: Conversion and Re-Use of Rural Buildings for Residential Use

Proposals for the conversion and re-use of suitable rural buildings for residential use will be permitted where:

  1. there is satisfactory evidence that employment or business use of the building is not viable;
  2. the existing use has ceased and its re-use would not result in the need for an additional building;
  3. the form, bulk and general design of the proposal, including any extensions, respect the rural character and appearance of the building;
  4. the proposal, including its curtilage and access arrangements, are in scale with, and sympathetic to, the surrounding landscape and does not require the provision of unsightly and intrusive infrastructure and ancillary buildings;
  5. the building is capable of accommodating adequate living and ancillary space (including garages). Proposals for extensions should be proportionate and reflective of the scale, character and appearance of the original building;
  6. the original building is structurally sound and any rebuilding works, necessitated by poor structural conditions and/ or the need for new openings in walls, do not involve substantial reconstruction;[36]
  7. where applicable, the architectural character and traditional materials have been retained and the proposal does not result in the loss of the original structure's character, or that the construction of the building is of sufficient quality not to require wholesale or substantive refurbishment.

Proposals relating to buildings which are of a substandard modern utilitarian construction will not generally be considered appropriate for residential conversion.

11.386 The re-use and adaptation (including conversion) of an industrial, commercial, agricultural or other building in the countryside to a residential use will only be permitted where it can be demonstrated that every reasonable effort has been made to continue or establish a business/commercial use or community activity, as set out in criterion a) above.

11.387 Residential proposals may be favourably considered where they form part of a proposed scheme for business re-use. Conditions may be imposed which require that the works necessary for the establishment of the business/enterprise have been completed prior to the occupation of the residential element. Furthermore, a condition or planning obligation tying the residential unit to operation of the enterprise may also be utilised as appropriate.

11.388 Only those buildings which are of an appropriate architectural quality and/or which incorporate traditional materials will be considered. Proposals for buildings of a modern, utilitarian construction such as portal framed units, temporary structures or those which utilise materials such as concrete block work, metal or other sheet cladding finishes will not generally be considered appropriate for conversion.

11.389 The Council will need to be satisfied that adequate living and storage (including garaging) space can be achieved without the necessity for significant extensions to the building. Proposals for future expansion of units will not generally be considered appropriate. Similarly, the Council will consider the withdrawal of normal permitted development rights to construct extensions and ancillary buildings.

11.390 Reference should be made to SPG in relation to the the Conversion and Re-Use of Rural Buildings.

RD3: Farm Diversification

Proposals for farm diversification developments which strengthen the rural economy will be permitted where:

  1. It is compatible with, complements and supports the principal agricultural activities of the existing working farm;
  2. It is of a scale and nature appropriate to the existing farm operation;
  3. It has appropriate regard to the highways and transport infrastructure;
  4. It would not have an adverse impact on the character, setting and appearance of the area and the surrounding landscape.

Proposals should give priority to the conversion of suitable existing buildings on the working farm. Where justified, new buildings will be permitted where they are integrated with, or linked to the existing working farm complex and not detrimental to the respective character and appearance of the area and surrounding landscape.

11.391 Diversification in rural areas can often add to the income streams and economic viability of farms, strengthen the rural economy and add to wider employment opportunities.

11.392 Farm diversification proposals are intended to supplement and support the continuation of the existing farming activity. Proposals should be accompanied by evidence detailing a justification for the use and its relationship with the existing farming activity.

11.393 Where a proposal incorporates farm shops they often have to import goods possibly from other local suppliers. In determining proposals made under this policy, consideration will be given to restricting the broad types of produce sold and to the volume of sales. Consideration will also be given to the scale of the operation notably where an unrestricted use would result in an adverse effect on the vitality and viability of nearby retail activities.

11.394 In considering proposals for farm diversification it is acknowledged that their rural context means that they cannot always be well served by public transport. Consequently, whilst its availability will be taken into account when considering the nature and scale of the proposal, the potential for certain diversification proposals which can only be accessible by private car is acknowledged. Such proposals should have regard to the sustainable transport hierarchy.

11.395 Where appropriate, legal agreements will be used to tie agricultural buildings to the land if re-use is associated with farm diversification where fragmentation of the agricultural unit is likely to occur.

RD4: Conversion and Re-Use of Rural Buildings for Non Residential Use

Proposals for the conversion of rural buildings for business use will be permitted where:

  1. the building is suitable for the specific use;
  2. There is sufficient land and storage space attached for the functional needs of the proposed use (including parking provision);
  3. the conversion and proposed use, or the use of surrounding land for the provision of access, parking facilities, ancillary structures, on site facilities or storage would not result in an adverse impact on the character of the area, nearby uses or impact on the viability of similar uses within the locality;
  4. the existing building is structurally sound and functionally suitable for the proposed use;
  5. any extension is reflective of the scale of the original building.

11.396 National Planning Policy recognises the essential contribution of a strong rural economy to supporting sustainable and vibrant rural communities. It seeks to provide a positive agenda for the potential for the re-use of existing buildings in rural areas for business purposes.

RD5: Equestrian Facilities

Development proposals for stabling, equestrian facilities or use of land for equestrian activities will be permitted where:

  1. the facility is grouped within an existing farm complex, or is sited as close as possible to existing buildings;
  2. the proposed use will be of an intensity appropriate to its environment and setting;
  3. the development will not have an adverse impact on the landscape or nature conservation interests; and
  4. suitable access and parking can be provided for horse boxes and proposed the level of commercial activity;
  5. commercial facilities have suitable access to the highway network.

11.397 Proposals for stables and associated equestrian facilities are normally associated with a countryside location. Planning permission will generally be required for the development of stables, unless the horses are part of the agricultural activity, or the stable is within the curtilage of a dwelling (reflecting potential permitted development rights).

11.398 Proposals which have no adverse landscape and/or environmental impact will be supported. In this respect, proposals will be expected to demonstrate how the development fits within its countryside setting and the regard it has to the settlement framework and its setting, including existing buildings.

11.399 The erection of a ménage for private domestic use should be designed so that it has no adverse effect upon the landscape, is well related to existing buildings, and of an appropriate scale.

11.400 Commercial stables and ménages will be considered appropriate as rural businesses where these can be accommodated without harm to the character of the area, and are considered acceptable in highways terms.

Strategic Policy – SP 13: Maintaining and Enhancing the Natural Environment

Proposals for development will be expected to protect and enhance the County's natural environment.

Proposals must reflect the role an ecologically connected environment has in protecting and enhancing biodiversity, defining the landscape, contribute to Well-being and the principles of the Sustainable Management of Natural Resources.

All development proposals should be considered in accordance with National Policy (PPW and TAN5) where a proposal for development would result in a significant adverse effect on a European designated site. Development that would result in unacceptable adverse environmental effects will not be permitted.

11.401 Carmarthenshire has a rich and diverse natural environment with a number of designated sites and protected species. This policy seeks to recognise the quality and value of the natural environment and landscapes across the Plan area, and their fundamental role in defining the County's identity, character and distinctiveness. The recognition of the considerable merits of green infrastructure for maintaining and enhancing biodiversity and ecological networks is implicit. Reference is made to Green Infrastructure Network policy PSD3.

11.402 The protection and enhancement of these elements form an important component of the Strategy, which looks to reflect not only those international and national designations, but also the contribution of sites and landscapes at the local level. The LDP will also seek to conserve and enhance natural resources such as geodiversity, water, soil and air quality.

11.403 This policy also recognises the often interconnected components of the natural environment and their contribution towards maintaining and enhancing biodiversity, as well as the creation of attractive and cohesive spaces for communities, and the well-being of Carmarthenshire's population.

11.404 The protection and enhancement of connectivity, and the contribution it makes to the quality of Carmarthenshire's landscape, natural environment and biodiversity is an important consideration. As a result, the potential impact of the Plan, its policies, and proposals upon nature conservation interests, amenity value, water/soil/air quality, hydrology, geology and geomorphological regimes will continue to inform the plan-making process.

11.405 A Habitats Regulation Assessment (HRA) has been undertaken to assess the impacts of the Plan on European protected sites, including those being considered for designation.

11.406 Whilst the Plan recognises the need for new development for both social and economic purposes the Council will, where appropriate, seek to safeguard Carmarthenshire's environmental qualities. The Plan also seeks to ensure the protection and enhancement of the natural environment through detailed policy.

11.407 In addition, and reflecting the duties placed upon Local Authorities, the Plan has regard to the National Park designation and the purpose for which it is designated, where it may affect the consideration of planning proposals.

NE1: Regional and Local Designations

Proposals for development that will result in unacceptable harm to a Local Nature Reserve (LNR), or Regionally Important Geological/Geomorphological Sites (RIGS) will only be permitted where it can be demonstrated that:

  1. there are exceptional circumstances, where the reasons for the development or land use change clearly outweighs the need to safeguard the biodiversity and nature conservation interests of the site;
  2. that any unacceptable harm can be reduced as far as possible in line with the mitigation hierarchy, by
    1. ensuring effective avoidance, minimisation or mitigation; or,
    2. where this is not feasible, that sufficient compensatory measures can be put in place that are of comparable or greater ecological value to that lost through development.
  3. The designation of such sites will, where appropriate, be supported.

11.408 LNRs and RIGS identify areas which are of local importance for nature conservation and geological value, and can include sites that contain a variety of habitat types or which support a range of species. Protection of these sites can make an important contribution to the Council's duty under Section 6 of the Environment (Wales) Act 2016. These features are also valuable with regards to their contribution to the quality of the local environment and to enabling adaption and resilience to climate change.

11.409 In circumstances where the need for a development might outweigh the need to protect a particular site, then impact will be avoided, minimised and mitigated as far as possible. Where residual impacts remain, measures will be put in place to ensure that alternative wildlife habitat provision or habitat creation is provided in order to ensure that there is no net loss in overall conservation value of the area or feature. Where appropriate, the authority will consider the use of conditions and/or planning obligations to provide appropriate mitigation and/or compensation measures.

11.410 Sites of Importance for Nature Conservation Value (SINCs) offer significant potential as a biodiversity resource. Whilst there are no SINCs identfied within the plan area, it remains an objective of the authority to actively explore their designation. Any future designation of SINCs will be in accordance with emerging SPG detailing the revised methodology for underpinning their identification. This SPG will be produced concurrently with the adoption of the Plan.

NE2: Biodiversity

Proposals for development should seek to maintain and enhance biodiversity.

Proposals for development will not be permitted where they would result in an adverse impact on priority species, habitats and features of recognised principal importance to the conservation of biodiversity and nature conservation, (namely those protected by Section 7 of the Environment (Wales) Act 2016 , except where it can be demonstrated that:

  1. There are exceptional circumstances, where the reasons for the development or land use change clearly outweighs the need to safeguard the biodiversity and nature conservation interests of the site; and,
  2. that any unacceptable harm can be reduced as far as possible in line with the mitigation hierarchy, by
    1. ensuring effective avoidance, minimisation or mitigation; or,
    2. where this is not feasible, that sufficient compensatory measures can be put in place that are of comparable or greater ecological value to that lost through development.

11.411 This policy seeks to ensure that the habitats and species identified within Section 7 of the Environment (Wales) Act 2016 are suitably protected from harmful development and that the Council fulfils its obligation to maintain and enhance biodiversity and promote ecosystem resilience. Full reference should be made to the Nature Conservation and Biodiversity SPG. This SPG includes guidance to developers and should assist in the implementation of this policy and the LDP. The role of habitats and associated areas as connectivity pathways, 'ecological networks' or 'animal corridor networks' will, where applicable, be considered (reference should be made to Policy NE3).

11.412 Where required, management plans detailing matters such as mitigation measures should be produced as part of any application, and agreed with the authority prior to permission being granted. Proposed mitigation should be accompanied by an agreed monitoring regime. Mitigation may include careful design and scheduling of work, with phasing considered so that the timing of any works minimises disturbance.

11.413 Where required, development proposals should seek to enhance biodiversity. Where biodiversity enhancement is required and not proposed as part of an application, significant weight will be given to its absence, and unless other significant material considerations indicate otherwise it will be necessary to refuse permission[37]. Proposals for development will be required to assess the attributes of ecosystem resilience in line with the framework outlined in paragraph 6.4.9 of PPW10 and will be expected to protect and enhance these attributes post development.

11.414 In exceptional circumstances, the need for a development might outweigh the need to protect a particular site. In such instances, then impact will be avoided, minimised and mitigated as far as possible and where residual impacts remain, measures will be put in place to ensure that alternative wildlife habitat provision or habitat creation is provided in order to ensure that there is no net loss in overall biodiversity of the area or feature.

11.415 The location and scale of a development, including the nature of the habitats on the site and the surrounding area will be a consideration in the nature of any management required.

11.416 The potential impacts, either individually or cumulatively of a development, should be carefully considered in determining any proposal. In this regard, the impact of noise, vibration, drainage, lighting, traffic and air quality considerations may have implications during construction or once any development is completed.

11.417 The use of planning conditions and/or planning obligations will be considered where appropriate.

NE3: Corridors, Networks and Features of Distinctiveness

Development proposals will be expected to maintain and enhance ecological corridors, networks and features of distinctiveness. Proposals which include provision for the retention and appropriate management of such features will be supported.

Proposals that result in an adverse effect on the connectivity or integrity of ecological corridors, networks or features of distinctiveness will only be permitted where:

  1. There are exceptional circumstances, where the reasons for the development or land use change clearly outweighs the need to safeguard the biodiversity and nature conservation interests of the site; and
  2. that any unacceptable harm can be reduced as far as possible in line with the mitigation hierarchy, by
    1. ensuring effective avoidance, minimisation or mitigation; or,
    2. where this is not feasible, that sufficient compensatory measures can be put in place that are of comparable or greater ecological value to that lost through development.

11.418 This policy seeks to ensure the appropriate protection and management of ecological corridors, networks and features of distinctiveness. These include features which, because of their linear and continuous structure or their functions as 'stepping stones' or 'wildlife corridors' are essential for reducing habitat fragmentation and encouraging ecological migration, dispersal or genetic exchange. Protection of these features can make an important contribution to the Council's duty under Section 6 of the Environment (Wales) Act 2016. These are also valuable with regards to their contribution to the quality of the local environment and to enabling adaption and resilience to climate change.

11.419 Features which contribute include: hedgerows, ditches and banks, stone walls, streams, tree belts, woodlands, veteran trees, parklands, green lanes, river corridors, lakes, ponds, road verges, or habitat mosaics or networks of other locally important habitats including peat bogs, heath-land, wetlands, saltmarshes, sand dunes and species rich grass lands.

11.420 Providing ecological connectivity is an important ecosystem service of the Green Infrastructure network and its protection and/or enhancement accords with Policy PSD3 Green Infrastructure Network. In identifying these features and in implementing this policy, reference should be made to the Green Infrastructure Assessment and accompanying mapping.

NE4: Development within the Caeau Mynydd Mawr SPG Area

Proposals will be permitted where they accord with the Council's commitment to promote and contribute to the delivery of the Conservation Objectives of the Caeau Mynydd Mawr Special Area of Conservation (CMM SAC) in line with the Habitats Regulations. Proposals located within the SPG Area will be required to contribute towards increasing the quality and amount of available habitat for the Marsh Fritillary butterfly within the SPG Area. The SPG Area is defined on the Proposals Map.

In order to achieve these objectives, and to mitigate for the loss of potential supporting habitat and connectivity for the marsh fritillary butterfly that may result through the development, the Council will (where applicable) seek to secure Planning Obligations (in accordance with LDP policy INF1 and the provisions of the SPG for the CMM SAC) from relevant developments within the SPG area.

11.421 Developments can proceed within the Caeau Mynydd Mawr SPG Area subject to there being no demonstrable likely significant effect upon the Caeau Mynydd Mawr Special Area of Conservation (CMM SAC). To this end, the Council will (where appropriate) seek developer contributions to fund the Council's delivery of habitat management project within the SPG Area. Further information is set out within the Caeau Mynydd Mawr Supplementary Planning Guidance (CMM SAC SPG).

11.422 In providing certainty and spatial focus, the CMM SPG clarifies expectations on all parties. The SPG provides a mechanism for developers to seek to mitigate the impact of their proposals on the SAC through contributing to the Council's CMM habitat management project. In order to ensure the LDP's compliance with the Habitats Regulations, the Council will (where appropriate) give priority to securing obligations in respect of the Caeau Mynydd Mawr SAC for proposals located within the CMM SPG Area. The Council may also (where appropriate) seek further detailed information from developers so as to inform the determination of planning applications.

11.423 The Caeau Mynydd Mawr SPG Area is identified on the proposals Map. The SPG is informed by robust evidence. Whilst the SPG does not advocate a rigid / blanket approach to calculating the amount of developer contributions required by the Council, it does set out a charging schedule which must form the starting point for all negotiations. Reference should be made to the SPG in terms of any proposed 'in kind' contributions.

11.424 Exceptionally, and in strict accordance with the provisions of the SPG, the agreed contribution amount may be subject to negotiation.

NE5: Coastal Management

Proposals for coastal management schemes will be permitted, provided that:

  1. The need for the development is appropriately justified;
  2. The development is in keeping with the surrounding environment;
  3. It protects, enhances, and where appropriate, creates walking linkages to the All Wales Coast Path and the footpath network;
  4. The scheme will not result in increased erosion, flooding or land instability.

Proposals will be encouraged to provide additional Active Travel routes to link communities and existing paths to the All Wales Coast Path.

11.425 Coastal defence schemes play an important role in protecting the County's population, assets and resources from tidal flooding and erosion. This policy seeks to ensure that coastal management schemes are constructed in appropriate locations, and do not adversely impact upon the surrounding landscape. Schemes will be required to pay regard to the protection of species and habitats in line with Strategic Policy SP13.

11.426 Encouragement will be given to incorporating appropriate public access and recreational facilities within schemes.

11.427 New coastal management schemes will not be permitted for the purpose of enabling new development in areas of flood risk or coastal erosion.

11.428 Proposals will be expected to take account of the contents of the South Wales (Lavernock Point to St Ann's Head) Shoreline Management Plan (SMP2). The SMP seeks to reduce these risks to people and the developed, historic and natural environments, and sets out how the coast should be managed in the future through a number of sustainable long-term coastal erosion and coastal flood risk management policies for the coast.

11.429 Specific reference is made to Policy NE7: Coastal Change Management Area and its context in relation to developments within, or affected by the SMP 'no active intervention' and 'managed realignment' policies.

11.430 The proposals contained within this LDP have been prepared with due regard to the policies set out in SMP2.

NE6: Coastal Development

  1. Proposals in all coastal locations will only be permitted provided that:
    1. They have taken into account matters associated with coastal change;
    2. They will not unacceptably harm the seascape through inappropriate scale, mass and design.
  2. Development proposals in undeveloped coastal locations will only be permitted provided that:
    1. It is necessary for them to be sited at a coastal location;
    2. They are part of a necessary coastal management scheme;
    3. They do not increase the risk of erosion, flooding or land instability;
    4. They would not result in the need for new coastal protection measures;
    5. They protect and enhance the landscape, seascape, biodiversity and historic environment.

11.431 Carmarthenshire has an extensive area of coastline, stretching from the mouth of the River Loughor to Marros. The coastal area can be defined as areas where the land and adjacent sea are considered mutually interdependent.

11.432 The undeveloped coast will rarely be considered the most appropriate location for development, and any proposals should have regard to the contents of SMP2, in addition to other policies of the Plan.

11.433 Matters associated with coastal change include: the risks of erosion, flooding, land instability, the preferred approaches to address such risks, and the impacts on biodiversity and ecological resilience.

11.434 Reference is made to policy NE7: Coastal Change Management Area and its context in relation to developments within, or affected by the SMP2 'no active intervention' and 'managed realignment' policies.

NE7: Coastal Change Management Area

The Coastal Change Management Area (CCMA) has been defined as those areas where the SMP2 identifies a policy of 'no active intervention' and 'managed realignment'.

Proposals for development located within the identified CCMA should not have an adverse impact on rates of coastal change elsewhere, and will be subject to the following:

1. New Residential Development

Proposals for any residential use within the CCMA will not be supported.

2. Relocation of Existing Residential Dwellings

Proposals for the relocation of existing residential dwellings located within the CCMA will be permitted where:

  1. The development replaces a permanent dwelling which is affected or threatened by erosion and/or coastal flood risk within 20 years of the date of the proposal; and
  2. The relocated dwelling is located an appropriate distance inland with regard to CCMA and other information in the Shoreline Management Plan, and it is in a location that is:
    1. in the case of an agricultural dwelling, within the farm holding or within or immediately adjacent to existing settlements, or
    2. within or immediately adjacent to existing settlements close to the location from which it was displaced;
    3. in the case of a static caravan(s), chalet(s) or permanent other visitor accommodation unit(s) - within, adjacent or within an acceptable proximity to the existing site.
  3. The site of the existing dwelling is cleared of any buildings or residential paraphernalia and made safe; and,
  4. The new dwelling is comparable in size to that which it is to replace; and,
  5. The proposal recognises the respective sense of place within the area and should not have a detrimental impact on the landscape, townscape, seascape and/or biodiversity of the area; and

3. Non-Residential Buildings

Proposals for the following types of new non-residential development will be permitted within the CCMA predicted as being at risk from coastal change, subject to an acceptable Flood Consequence Assessment and Stability Assessment:

  1. development directly linked to the coastal area (e.g. beach huts, cafés, tea rooms, shops, short let holiday accommodation, static and touring caravan sites, camping sites, leisure activities); and
  2. development providing substantial economic and social benefits to the community; and
  3. where it can be demonstrated that there will be no increased risk to life, or any significant risk to property.

Redevelopment of, or extensions to, existing non-residential property or intensification of existing non-residential land uses on sites within the CCMA, will be permitted where it can be demonstrated through a suitable Flood Consequences Assessment and Stability Assessment that there will be no increased risk to life, nor any significant risk to property (where appropriate).

4. Extensions to Existing Dwellings and Infrastructure

Proposals for the following types of development will be permitted in the CCMA, subject to a suitable Flood Consequences Assessment and/or Stability Assessment:

  1. Limited residential extensions that are closely related to the existing scale of the property;
  2. Ancillary development within the residential curtilage of existing dwellings;
  3. Key community and other infrastructure (including roads), which is required to be located within the CCMA to provide the intended benefit for the wider community will be permitted where it is accompanied by clear plans to manage the impact of coastal change on it and the services it provides.

11.435 As with policy RE6, regard should be had to SMP2 which sets a range of policies for the coastline, which are 'hold the line', 'no active intervention' or 'managed realignment', per policy epoch (namely: up to 2025, 2026 - 2055, and 2056 - 2105).

11.436 The SMP2 can be viewed at www.southwalescoast.org . PPW states that Local Authorities should help reduce the risk of flooding and the impact of coastal erosion by avoiding inappropriate development in vulnerable areas.

11.437 The CCMA represents where the accepted SMP2 policy is for 'no active intervention' or 'managed realignment' during the Plan period.

11.438 New residential development is not considered suitable in the CCMA. This reflects the level of risk of coastal erosion and flooding in these areas. The implementation of this approach will apply equally to proposals to change of use of other permanent buildings to residential accommodation and replacement dwellings, and is part of a precautionary approach which is guided by the policy considerations set out within the SMP2.

11.439 The type of residential use this applies to includes individual dwellings, flats above existing commercial properties, sheltered housing, student accommodation, hostels, shared housing for disabled people, nursing homes and care homes, residential education, static caravans and chalets (including those associated within leisure and tourism) where they are connected to infrastructure and part of an established and fully serviced site and training centres.

11.440 Planning conditions will be applied, or a planning obligation will be secured where there is a need to: limit the planned life of a development or seasonal use; remove a time-limited development or existing dwellings on cessation of use; review relevant planning permissions; manage the occupancy of a relocated dwelling.

11.441 To enable coastal communities to adapt to coastal change, the Policy facilitates the relocation and replacement of permanent dwellings to alternative locations safe from coastal erosion. It seeks to ensure coastal communities remain sustainable by maintaining levels of housing stock and reducing risk to people and property.

11.442 Where an extension to a residential property requires permission, they will be supported where it can be demonstrated that the benefits to the homeowner outweigh any increase in risk to the property. However, consideration must be given to the wellbeing of the occupants, risk to life as a result of flooding, or erosion.

11.443 Non-residential development will be subject to the timeframe anticipated for loss of the property as a result of coastal erosion. This would apply to proposals for uses such as community facilities, business uses, sports pitches and playing fields. The risk assessment should fully consider the benefits against the risks associated with utilising a property with a potentially limited lifespan.

11.444 Where appropriate, a time limited planning permissions may be used to control the planned life-time of a new development. This would allow control over the future of the development and potential risk to property and people where this is appropriate.


Strategic Policy – SP 14: Protection and Enhancement of the Built and Historic Environment

Development proposals should preserve or enhance the built and historic environment of the County, its cultural, townscape and landscape assets, and, where appropriate, their setting.

Proposals will be expected to promote high quality design that reinforces local character and respects and enhances the cultural and historic qualities of the plan area.

11.445 Carmarthenshire has a rich and diverse historical and cultural built heritage with a range of Conservation Areas, Listed Buildings, and Scheduled Monuments. The recognition of the Plan area's built heritage and its conservation is essential in providing a sense of history, character, and a sense of place.

11.446 The Plan area also contains discovered, and yet to be discovered archaeological sites and features.The Policy and the Plan aims, in conjunction with primary legislation on the built environment and historic buildings to safeguard the cultural integrity of the historic settlements, features and buildings within the Plan area. Where applicable, it also looks to contribute to the enhancement of the historic and built environment. This recognises that our historic assets are irreplaceable resources and their conservation provides social, cultural, economic and environmental benefits.

11.447 The County's historic buildings, townscape and landscape should be regarded as assets and positively conserved and enhanced for the benefit of residents and visitors alike. These are not only affected by change and neglect, but also by changes to their setting. As such, this is an important consideration in making decisions on proposals which may have an effect.

11.448 Many elements of the County's built and historic environment are protected through legislation or other policy provisions, and as such do not require policies in the revised LDP. The Plan does not therefore include policies in relation to facets of the built heritage such as Scheduled Monuments as they are adequately protected elsewhere.

11.449 There are however aspects relating to the protection of the historic environment which may be addressed through the revised LDP, particularly those pertaining to local features and local buildings.

11.450 Clear guidance and legislation in respect of the following is contained within PPW: Edition 10 – Chapter 6: Conserving the Historic Environment, and Policy SP13 – Maintaining and Enhancing the Natural

11.451 Environment which recognises the importance of such areas and features of the County:

  • Historic Parks and Gardens[38] - Many parks and gardens are historically significant and are listed in the Historic Parks and Gardens in Wales Register. These areas are also defined on the LDP Proposals Map;
  • Historic Landscapes[39]
  • Archaeological Remains[40]
  • Enabling Developments[41] - PPW sets out the provisions through which an enabling proposal would be considered
  • Scheduled Monuments - These are defined on the Proposals Map

11.452 The authority will prepare SPG as appropriate and where required with regard to the Historic and Built Environment.

Policy BHE1: Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas

  1. Proposals in respect of a listed building will only be permitted where they accord with the following:
    1. Proposals for the alteration and/or extension to a listed building, or its curtilage will be required to ensure that the special architectural character, or historic interest is preserved or enhanced;
    2. The change of use of a listed building, or its curtilage will only be permitted where it contributes to the retention of a building or its sustainable re-use, whilst avoiding an adverse effect on its character, special interest or structural integrity;
    3. Proposals for the total or substantial demolition of a listed building will only be permitted where there is the strongest justification and convincing evidence that the proposal is necessary;
    4. Proposals which have a relationship to, or impact upon the setting of a listed building, or its curtilage must ensure that the setting is preserved or enhanced.
  2. Developments within or adjacent to a conservation area will be permitted, where it would preserve or enhance the character or appearance of the conservation area, or its setting.
  3. New developments in conservation areas should be of a high standard of design which responds to the area's special characteristics and features.

11.453 Where a proposal is for a new building within a conservation area, it should have regard to the following:

  • Important views, vistas, street scenes, roof-scapes, trees, open spaces, gaps and other features that contribute to the character or appearance of the conservation area;
  • Historically significant boundaries or other elements that contribute to the established form of development;
  • The relationship to existing buildings and spaces, and settlement for;
  • Scale, height and density, architectural design, and materials.

BHE2: Landscape Character

Development proposals should relate to the specific landscape and visual characteristics of the local area, ensuring that the overall integrity of landscape character is maintained by:

  1. identifying, protecting and, where appropriate, enhancing the distinctive landscape and historical, cultural, ecological and geological heritage, including natural and man-made elements associated with existing landscape character;
  2. protecting international and national landscape designations;
  3. preserving local distinctiveness, sense of place and setting;
  4. respecting and conserving specific landscape features, and integrating the principles of placemaking and Green Infrastructure;
  5. protecting key landscape views and vistas.

11.454 Carmarthenshire is characterised by a diverse and high quality landscape resources and areas of notable visual value. It also includes a range of international and national landscapes designations.

11.455 The County's key landscape attributes are varied and include upland areas, coastal plains and river valleys of high landscape value and ecological importance. These provide significant environmental, economic and social benefits and help to create a sense of place.

11.456 The Policy seeks to protect, maintain and where appropriate enhance the character and quality of Carmarthenshire's landscape with those features which contribute to the County's distinctive character afforded appropriate levels of protection with their significance highlighted using the former Countryside Council for Wales' (CCW) LANDMAP resource.

Note: LANDMAP is a Geographical Information System based landscape resource where landscape characteristics, qualities and influences on the landscape are recorded and evaluated into a nationally consistent data set.

11.457 The policy, therefore, will be supported by a Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) on LANDMAP Landscape Character Assessment. This SPG will build on the work undertaken and policy provisions in respect of Placemaking and Green Infrastructure in developing an integrated suite of guidance documents to guide development proposals.

11.458 This SPG will identify and describe distinctive landscape character areas and types throughout the plan area.

11.459 In this respect the purpose of the policy is to reflect the specific distinctiveness, qualities and sensitivities of the County's landscape components.


Strong Connections - Strongly connected people, places and organisations that are able to adapt to change

11.460 This Revised LDP seeks to understand and recognise the role a of community and sense of place by seeking to distribute new development in manner that recognises and respects the role and function of our settlements.

11.461 By distributing growth in a sustainable manner it recognises the value of connectivity. The Plan seeks to assist in the creation of connected communities that are resilient, vibrant and can foster a well-being amongst residents.

11.462 Through the creation of a resilient, connected and sustainable County, the Plan seeks to reflect the challenges facing our communities and the need to respond positively. It sets a framework to contribute to tackling climate change and develops a strategy and policy agenda centred on sustainable development, whilst acknowledging the diversity of the County.

11.463 Whilst it is recognised that there is an overlap between the themes and the assignment of policies the following having been identified under this theme:

  • Strategic Policy – SP 15: Climate Change
  • Strategic Policy – SP 16: Sustainable Distribution – Settlement Framework
  • Strategic Policy – SP 17: Transport and Accessibility
  • Strategic Policy – SP 18: Mineral Resources
  • Strategic Policy – SP 19: Waste Management

11.464 The following policies seek to support the delivery of the Plan's strategic objectives, but also provide high level links and broad conformity with the Well-Being Goals.

Strategic Policy – SP 15: Climate Change

Where development proposals respond to, are resilient to, adapt to and minimise the causes and impacts of climate change they will be supported. In particular proposals will be supported where they:

  1. Contribute to a reduction in carbon emissions by reflecting sustainable transport principles and minimising the need to travel, particularly by private motor car;
  2. Avoid, or where appropriate, minimise the risk of flooding including the incorporation of measures such as SuDS and flood resilient design;
  3. Promote the energy hierarchy by reducing energy demand, promoting energy efficiency and increasing the supply of renewable energy;
  4. Incorporate appropriate climate responsive design solutions including orientation, layout, density and low carbon solutions (including design and construction methods) and utilise sustainable construction methods where feasible;
  5. Contribute towards the protection and enhancement of green infrastructure assets and networks as carbon sinks

Proposals for development which are located within areas at risk from flooding will be resisted unless they accord with the provisions of Planning Policy Wales TAN 15.

11.465 The need to tackle climate change represents a fundamental challenge if sustainable development and the obligations under the Well-being of Future Generations Act 2015 are to be delivered. The economic, social and environmental implications arising from Climate change will be profound and a failure to address it will result any effort to plan for sustainability unsuccessful.

11.466 The changing climate and the impacts for Wales predicted by the UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP) present the planning system with serious challenges. In addressing them, Planning Policy Wales (PPW) outlines a series of objectives which should be taken into account during the preparation of a development plan.

11.467 The LDP categorises settlements into a hierarchy which reflects their relative sustainability and takes account of the sustainable transport hierarchy. The Plan's aspiration of minimising the need to travel, particularly by private motor car, and its contributory role towards the facilitation of an integrated transport strategy seeks to direct development to appropriate locations which serve to achieve this.

11.468 The potential impact of flood risk forms an important consideration in the assessment of the appropriateness of sites for inclusion within the LDP. In this regard, a precautionary approach will be adopted in the identification of sites for inclusion in the Plan. The consideration of any proposals in respect of flooding have regard to the provisions of PPW and TAN15: Development and Flood Risk which provides guidance on assessing developments at risk from flooding.

11.469 Proposals affected by flood risk will be required to submit a Flood Consequences Assessment as part of any planning application and the Council will consult with Natural Resources Wales (NRW). Where a site is in part impacted upon by flood risk, the developer will need to consider the impact of the risk on the developability of the remainder of the site. Where appropriate they should undertake the necessary evidential work (including a flood consequences assessment and/or topographical survey) to the satisfaction of NRW. Regard should be had to Policy CCH4: Flood Risk Management and Avoidance as contained within this Plan.

11.470 Developments will be expected to exhibit good design principles to promote the efficient use of resources, including minimising waste and pollution generation, and maximising energy efficiency and the efficient use of other resources. Reference should be had to policy SP19 in relation to the waste and the waste hierarchy and minimisation of waste.

11.471 Development proposals will be expected to make full and appropriate use of land. The potential impacts of climate change should be central to the design process, including the contribution that location, density, layout and built form can make towards climate responsive developments.

11.472 The Welsh Government is committed to using the planning system to optimise renewable energy and low carbon energy generation. PPW states that Local Planning Authorities can make a positive provision by considering the contribution that their area can make towards developing and facilitating renewable and low carbon energy, and enable this contribution to be delivered. Renewable energy targets have been set by the Welsh Government, one target is for Wales to be generating 70% of its electricity consumption from renewable energy by 2030.

11.473 Proposals/land uses and land management practices will be encouraged where they help to secure and protect carbon sinks (including peat). Such an approach will enhance resilience to the impacts of climate change and to reducing the causes of climate change through the protection of carbon sinks and as a sustainable energy source.

11.474 PPW sets out clear guidance in terms of requirements for climate responsive developments and sustainable buildings. Reference should be made to the Practice Guidance – Planning for Sustainable Buildings (WG, 2014).

CCH1: Renewable Energy

Proposals for renewable and low carbon energy development and associated infrastructure, either on their own, cumulatively or in combination with existing, approved or proposed development will be permitted provided they accord with the following:

  1. The development will not result in demonstrable harm to statutorily protected sites and species, and habitats and species identified in Section 7 of the Environment Act;
  2. The development will not have an unacceptable impact on roads, rail or aviation safety; electromagnetic interference to communications installations, radar or air traffic control systems, emergency services communications or other telecommunications systems;
  3. Proposals will not cause an unreasonable risk or nuisance to, and impact upon the amenities of, nearby residents or other members of the public, and will not result in unacceptable loss of public accessibility to the area;
  4. Proposals should be accompanied with appropriate mitigation measures, including satisfactory restoration of land following decommissioning.
  1. Proposals for Large Scale Wind Farms:

    Large scale wind farms of 25MW and over will be permitted within and adjoining Strategic Search Areas, subject to them meeting criteria a to d.

  1. Proposals in Local Search Areas:

    Proposals for solar developments of between 5MW and 50MW will be permitted in identified Local Search Areas, subject to them meeting criteria a to d.

  1. Proposals Outside Strategic Search Areas and Local Search Areas:

    Proposals outside search areas must not prejudice the purpose of these areas and should comply with the following criteria, and criteria a to d:

  1. The development will not have an unacceptable impact on visual amenity or landscape character through: the number, scale, size, design and siting of turbines and associated infrastructure;
  2. The development will not have an unacceptable impact upon areas designated for their landscape value;
  3. Wind turbine developments should not have unacceptable cumulative impacts in relation to existing wind turbines, those which have permission or are proposed.

11.475 This Policy applies to all renewable and low carbon energy developments that require planning permission, and sets out the criteria against which proposals will be assessed. These developments include onshore windfarms, wind turbines, solar technology, biomass, energy from waste, hydro-power and combined heat and power.

11.476 This Policy supports the Welsh Government's commitment to reduce our reliance on energy generated from fossil fuels and actively managing the transition to a low carbon economy.

Renewable Energy Assessment

11.477 A Renewable Energy Assessment (REA) was undertaken to inform and evidence this policy and to identify the potential for renewable energy generation within the area. The method of the REA has followed that set out by the Welsh Government, and will assist in meeting the targets set out in PPW10. The REA consists of a high-level, strategic assessment of the potential for different scales of renewable and low-carbon energy generation in different locations.

11.478 Tables 9 and 10 detail the realistic renewable energy contributions that could be made towards meeting a proportion of the total demand for energy within the Authority.


Energy Technology

Capacity Factor Assumed

Maxium* Potential 20033

Existing

Additional Target** 2033

Total Installed Capacity 2033 (MW)

Total Energy Generated 2033 (MWh)

Electrical Capacity (MWe)

Energy Generated (MWh)

Installed Capacity (MW)

Energy Generated (MWh)

Installed Capacity (MW)

Energy Generated (MWh)

Wind Power (existing include SSAs)

0.27

164.1

388,129

164.1

388,129

0

0

164.1

388,129

Biomass Energy Crop (CHP)

0.9

18.4

144,857

0

0

0

0

0

0

Energy from Waste with CHP

0.9

0.7

5,751

0

0

0

0

0

0

Hydropower

0.37

6.7

21,860

6.6

21,304

0.1

417

6.7

21,721

Landfill Gas

0.6

2.3

11,826

2.3

11,826

0

0

2.3

11,826

Solar PV Farms

0.1

283.2

248,097

126.5

110,851

60

52,560

186.5

163,411

Other including food waste, animal slurry, poultry litter, sewage sludge & sewage gas (AD with CHP)

0.42

3.3

12,046

1.0

3,679

1.3

4,857

2.3

8,536

Building Integrated

0.1

52.7

46,133

29.4

25,792

4.6

4,068

34.1

29,860

Total

-

531

878,700

330

561,534

66

61,902

396

623,483

Electrical energy demand 2008

923,148

Projected electrical energy demand

917,389

Percentage electricity demand met by renewable energy resource

61%

68%

* This is the maximum resource, it includes existing capacity and 100% of the potential.

** Targets are based on a percentage of maximum potential minus existing generation.

Table 9: Resource Summary for Renewable Electricity


Energy Technology

Capacity Factor Assumed

Maximum Potential * 2033

Existing

Additional ** Target 2033

Total Installed Capacity

Total Energy Generated

Heat Capacity

(MWt)

Energy Generated (MWh)

Installed Capacity (MWt)

Energy Generated (MWh)

Installed Capacity (MWt)

Energy Generated (MWh)

2033 (MW)

2033 (MWh)

Existing Biomass (CHP)

0.5

36.7

160,953

0

0

0

0

0

0

Biomass Boilers, Wood

0.5

36.3

159,197

0

0

0

0

0

0

Energy from Waste with CHP

0.5

1.5

6,390

0

0

0

0

0

0

Other including animal slurry, poultry litter, sewage sludge and sewage gas (AD with CHP)

0.5

3.7

15,990

0.2

986

2.0

8,736

2.2

9,722

Landfill Gas (with CHP)

0.5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Building Integrated

0.2

89.9

157,440

35.0

61,292

11.0

19,230

46.0

80,522

Total

35.2

62,278

13.0

27,966

48.2

90,244

Heat energy demand 2008

2,130,266

Projected electrical energy demand

1,493,795

Percentage thermal demand met by renewable energy resource

3%

6%

* This is the maximum resource, it includes existing capacity and 100% of the potential.

** Targets are based on a percentage of maximum potential minus existing generation.

Table 10: Resource Summary for Renewable Heat

Strategic Search Areas

11.479 TAN 8: Planning for Renewable Energy defines Strategic Search Areas (SSAs) and these areas are considered to be the most appropriate locations for large scale wind farm development. Carmarthenshire has two SSAs, Area G: Brechfa Forest and Area E: Pontardawe. The principle of large scale wind turbine development and associated landscape change is accepted within SSAs.

11.480 Brechfa Forest can be described as an extensive area of continuous forest, ranging from conifer plantations across upland plateaux to ancient broadleaved woodlands in steep, narrow valleys. The forest is a working forest and is a popular site for outdoor recreation. Two wind farms are currently operational within the forest, Alltwalis and Brechfa West. Further large scale wind farms should be directed to this SSA, and will be supported provided that they accord with criteria iv – vii.

11.481 Area E: Pontardawe largely falls within Neath Port Talbot and Swansea administrative boundaries. Mynydd y Betws wind farm, which is located within Carmarthenshire now operates within part of Area E: Pontardawe.

Local Search Areas

11.482 The REA has assessed the potential for the Authority to deliver renewable energy, and has concluded that larger scale electricity generation from solar may be viable in parts of the Authority. These areas are set out in the REA, and are annotated on the Proposals Map as Local Search Areas (LSAs). LSAs are identified by applying a series of assumptions and by undertaking a mapping exercise that used layers of constraints. These areas are considered to be the least constrained areas within the Authority in order to deliver energy.

11.483 Four Solar PV LSAs have been identified as being suitable for schemes of between 5MW and 50MW. LSAs are identified to encourage developers to further investigate the potential for solar farms in these areas. Further site specific assessments will be required to assist any planning application for such developments.

LSA S1

LSA S2

LSA S3

LSA S4

11.483 Land within LSAs will not be safeguarded for energy generation, however, there will be a prioritisation for such developments where there are simultaneously competing interests.

Other Technologies

11.484 Whilst the REA recognises that solar technologies have the most potential to deliver renewable energy within the County, proposals for other renewable energy technologies, including biomass, energy from waste, hydro power, and landfill gas will also be favourably considered, subject to meeting the provisions of this policy.

Locational Considerations

11.485 In assessing the cumulative impact of proposals, any unacceptable harm to the landscape, visual impact, noise, ecology and surface and groundwaters will also be considered against other renewable energy and low carbon developments.

11.486 The amenity of residents and occupants of nearby properties should be considered, and any potential nuisance arising from the development and its associated infrastructure should be minimised. Proposals that would result in unacceptable nuisance arising from the operation of such development, such as noise, safety risk, radio, telecommunications or aviation interference, shadow flicker from wind turbines and glint and glare from solar panels will not be permitted.

11.487 Proposals will be required to ensure that they do not give rise to problems of highway safety or have a detrimental effect on the highway network as a result of construction and maintenance traffic. In siting development, existing bridleways and footpaths shall be safeguarded with no permanent loss to their length and quality. Temporary and appropriate re-routing of public rights of way during construction will be required. Encouragement will be given to enhancing existing and providing new recreational facilities.

11.488 Supplementary Planning Guidance willbe produced to expand on the provisions of this policy.

Policy CCH2 – Electric Vehicle Charging Points

Proposals for development will be required to include the installation of an electrical socket suitable for charging electric vehicles

  1. Residential Development

Houses

Where houses are provided with a garage, driveway or dedicated parking bay, one standard EV Charging Unit* should be provided per dwelling.

Flats (non-dedicated parking bays)

Where flatted development has integrated parking bays (under croft or parking court) proposals should include at least one dedicated bay with Fast EV Charging Unit to service the development.

  1. Non-Residential Development

For non-residential developments where car parking is provided, at least 10% of those bays should have ULEV charging point. Rapid charging points for electric vehicles, should be provided where the local electricity network is technically able to support this.

11.489 National policy in the form of Planning Policy Wales sets an agenda which seeks to progress towards a shift to low or zero emissions means of road transport. In this respect, it recognises the role of electrical charging points in delivering that shift[[1]].

11.490 In taking this view it advocates adopting a sustainable approach which balances short-term needs against long-term objectives in relation to considerations such as reduced public exposure to airborne pollution, noise pollution etc. as part of the preparation of development plans.

11.491 As reflected in figure 12 below, Welsh Government policy sets out a sustainable transport hierarchy in relation to new development. This hierarchy recognises the role of Ultra Low Emission Vehicles in decarbonising transport, particularly in rural areas[[2]].

output

Figure 12: The Sustainable Transport Hierarchy for Planning

11.492 This LDP recognises the diversity of communities across Carmarthenshire noting in particular the largely rural characteristics that typify much of its area. As reflected in PPW such areas often require different approaches to sustainable transport with new development needing to reflect local circumstances. For example, in developing the LDP strategy regard has been had to the potential for growth within rural areas and the identification of sites has had regard to the hierarchy including measures to encourage the use of Ultra Low Emission Vehicles. In this regard the above policy provides a clear focus on access to such vehicles as a positive policy objective for developments across the authority including in rural communities.

11.493 The Plan recognises the impacts of climate change and the move to decarbonisation with the need to promote access to alternative means of transport in accordance with the provisions of national policy. 35% of Carmarthenshire's residents live in rural areas with 65% of the land area classified as rural. The rural nature of much of Carmarthenshire has therefore been a key consideration in developing the strategy and the distribution of growth.

11.494 Rurality is a particular challenge for public transport, with the sparse populations in most rural areas and communities, served by a low frequency service.

11.495 Whilst it is recognised that the promotion of sustainable transport and indeed the eventual decarbonisation of transport can be achieved in many urban areas it must not further dislocate the connections between urban and rural communities[[3]]. In relation to our communities within rural areas the Plan seeks to deliver a sustainable development in a way which references and integrates new and alternative transport approaches including the promotion of ultra-low emission vehicles.

Where a home has a dedicated parking space in the form of a garage or a driveway/parking bay as a minimum requirement a 16 Amp socket should be provided either in a garage or in close proximity to a dedicated car parking place. In the absence of a garage, a wall mounted external socket should be provided.

11.496 Proposals for non-residential and commercial developments should include as a minimum requirement charging points for 10% of car parking spaces. In implementing this requirement regard will be had to the provisions of PPW Edition 10: Paragraph 4.1.39. Note:32 Amp socket. Commercial standalone charging units provide 2 chargers.

CCH3: Water Quality and Protection of Water Resources

Proposals for development will be permitted where they do not compromise or lead to a deterioration in either the water resource or the quality of controlled waters. Proposals will, where appropriate, be expected to contribute towards improvements to water quality.

Watercourses will be safeguarded through ecological buffer zones or corridors to protect aspects such as riparian habitats and species, water quality, and provide for flood plain capacity. Proposals will be permitted where they do not have an adverse impact on nature conservation, fisheries, public access, or water related recreation use of the rivers in the County.

Development proposals must make efficient use of water resources and where appropriate, contribute towards improvements to water quality. SuDS must be implemented where appropriate with approval required through the Sustainable Drainage Approval Body (SAB).

11.497 Water as a resource is extremely valuable and matters such as pollutants, flood prevention, groundwater and the protection and the enhancement of aquatic ecosystems are all important considerations reflected by legislation and guidance. The Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) (WFD) sets out the requirements in relation to the water environment and full regard should be had to its content.

11.498 Water pollution and consequent poor water quality can be from a single source, or from diffuse sources, such as from agricultural and urban runoff. The WFD has provided the opportunity to work with partner organisations, particularly Natural Resources Wales, to recognise the need to improve the whole water environment and promote the sustainable use of water for the benefit of both people and wildlife. River Basin Management Plans (RBMP) have been prepared which set out environmental objectives and standards, and a programme of measures by which they can be achieved.

11.499 Dwr Cymru Welsh Water (DCWW) are responsible for the supply and treatment of water within the County. DCWW continue to meet increased demand for sewerage services through legislative and regulatory mechanisms, and supply/demand investment as set out within the Asset Management Programme (AMP). The AMP investment will support future growth and regeneration.

11.500 With regards to the Carmarthen Bay and Estuaries European Marine Site (CBEEMS), reference should be made to Policy INF4. The Burry Inlet SPG has been prepared to elaborate upon this Plan. It seeks to balance environmental and developmental considerations with a view to facilitating the delivery of growth within the revised LDP up to 2033.

11.501 The recognition that there are environmental considerations in relation to growth is a key concept of sustainable development. Given that the impact of the Plan's allocations and commitments has already been considered by the Authority and deliverability established, this Policy simply provides a means to explore project or application level matters on a site by site basis, as and where appropriate. This Policy seeks to provide the Authority with a means to consider the merits of proposals that come forward within the Plan period that are not currently identified within the Plan.

11.502 Water quality can be improved through a number of measures including the effective design, construction and operation of sewerage systems, the use of wetlands or greenspace for flood alleviation, and the use of SuDS. The promotion of agricultural good practice would also contribute to improvements in quality. Where appropriate and applicable to the planning system, this Plan identifies measures that can be taken forward.

11.503 Proposals should seek wherever possible to incorporate water conservation techniques including rainwater harvesting and grey-water recycling.

11.504 The water resources requirements for Carmarthenshire are supplied entirely by DCWW, and the county lies within the Tywi conjunctive use system (Tywi WRZ). The most recent DCWW Resource Management Plan predicts that the Tywi WRZ will be in surplus throughout the period of the LDP, based on the projected increase in household numbers within Carmarthenshire of 14.6% between 2014 and 2039, with an increase from 82,751 to 89,532 between 2018 and 2033. This overall growth forecast exceeds the growth provided for in the LDP.

11.505 Matters relating to abstraction and water supply will need to be continually monitored, to ensure that the growth identified within this LDP is commensurate with the availability of the resource, over and above the protection allowed through this policy.

11.506 The Council will continue to work with and consult NRW and DCWW on development proposals as appropriate. The Council will also consult NRW on development proposals in the vicinity of river corridors and estuaries. Prospective developers should seek the advice and consent of NRW when appropriate. Where proposals relate to a main river or ordinary watercourse, the requirement for an appropriate buffer adjoining both banks should be incorporated into any proposals to protect and encourage local biodiversity.

11.507 As always, proposals should satisfy the policies and provisions of the Plan as a whole. Specific reference may be made however to Strategic Policy 13 –Maintaining and Enhancing the Natural Environment, most notably in relation to sites of international importance to nature conservation. There are particular opportunities to acknowledge and embrace green infrastructure as part of a placemaking approach.

CCH4: Flood Risk Management and Avoidance

Proposals for development located within areas of identified flood risk will only be permitted in exceptional circumstances, where:

  1. In areas at risk of fluvial, pluvial, coastal and reservoir flooding, where it can be demonstrated that the development meets the justification tests set out within National Policy[42] and is supported by robust technical evidential statement.
  2. Where it would not have a detrimental effect on the integrity of existing fluvial, pluvial or coastal flood defences, or would impede access to existing and future defences for maintenance and emergency purposes;
  3. it would not lead to an unacceptable increase in the risk of flooding on the site or elsewhere will not be permitted; or,
  4. In areas subject to flood risk from localised sources, a drainage strategy is submitted which demonstrates to the Council's satisfaction that the impacts can be managed or alleviated.

Proposals should seek to incorporate effective and environmentally sympathetic flood risk mitigation measures, such as SuDS.

Proposals where there is the potential for floodplain reconnection should be incorporated into the development to ensure that opportunities are maximised, and that floodplain storage and water flow are not adversely affected.

11.508 The majority of Carmarthenshire's settlements are located by rivers or the coast. This reflects the historical development pattern and whilst the Plan cannot influence the spatial patterns of the past, it can help shape the decisions with the wellbeing of future generations in mind.

11.509 Whilst an understanding and recognition of river and tidal flooding has been implicit in planning practice for many years, there is now an increasing awareness of other sources of flooding – notably surface water. These other sources can impact upon settlements that are not close to a river or the coast.

11.510 The policy, and the strategic direction of the Plan recognises and reflects the need for a sustainable approach to flood risk. As such, this Plan priorities the protection of the undeveloped or unobstructed floodplain from development and seeks to prevent the cumulative effects of incremental development[43]. However, it also seeks to recognise that the dynamics of flood risk are complex and extend beyond the on-site connotations in respect of the siting of an individual development.

11.511 The Plan has regard to the provisions of national planning policy on flood risk and a precautionary approach has been taken in formulating policies which identify land use allocations and site specific proposals. The Plan also looks to recognise the dynamic nature of flood risk but also their vital contribution to the environmental qualities, biodiversity, green infrastructure network, and the intrinsic landscape value of the County.

11.512 The contribution of natural channel processes is recognised and the policy encourages floodplain reconnection. Consequently, developments and notably new infrastructure should be designed in a way which does not result in the net loss of floodplain storage, impede water flows or increase flood risk elsewhere[44]. Regard should be had to the Working with Natural Processes (WWNP) Floodplain Reconnection Potential[45].

11.513 National policy in respect of flood risk is set out within Technical Advice Note 15: Development and Flood Risk (2004). The fluvial and tidal flood risk areas are set out on the accompanying Development Advice Maps (DAM). These areas are categorised as 4 zones, namely Zone A, Zone B, and more notably Zones C1 and C2 which are more susceptible to flooding.

11.514 Development will only be considered in areas at a high risk of flooding where it can be demonstrated that the site can comply with the justification and assessment requirements set out in TAN 15. Only less vulnerable development will be permitted within Zone C2. Where a development is proposed in an area of identified flood risk an accompanying technical evidential statement must be provided to satisfy the provisions of TAN15 and show clearly that the new development will alleviate the threat and consequences of flooding.

CCH5: Renewable and Low Carbon Energy in New Developments

Development proposals that connect to existing sources of renewable energy, district heating networks, or use low carbon technology will be supported.

Development proposals that include: residential development of 100 or more homes; or development with a total floorspace of 1000sq m or more; will be required to submit an Energy Assessment to determine the feasibility of incorporating such a scheme, and where viable, would be required to implement the scheme.

Major developments that consume significant energy will be encouraged to facilitate the development of, and/or connection to proposed District Heating and Cooling Networks.

11.515 This policy seeks to encourage the incorporation of renewable and low carbon energy in all new developments.

11.516 An Energy Assessment will investigate the potential to incorporate and use low carbon technology, or to use existing sources of renewable energy or district heating networks. Assessments will be required to demonstrate how the development can make a contriution towards increased levels of energy generation from renewable or low carbon sources.

11.517 Further guidance will be provided in the Renewable and Low Carbon Energy Supplementary Planning Guidance.

CCH6: Climate Change – Forest, Woodland and Tree Planting

Support will be given to proposals for the creation and protection of new woodland, forests, tree belts and corridors where they seek to promote delivery of the national and local climate change and decarbonisation ambitions.

Proposals for tree planting which seeks to contribute to a reduction of flood risk will also be supported.

11.518 The Welsh Government has identified a target to increase woodland cover in Wales by at least 2,000 hectares per annum from 2020. This policy seeks to reflect this national objective and the commitment to the creation of a national forest. There are opportunities to create links to green infrastructure, incorporate active travel facilities and enhance tourism and leisure opportunities, as well as promoting enhanced biodiversity, connectivity and ecosystems resilience.

11.519 Trees, forest and woodland provides a range of ecosystem services, such as improving air quality, providing a cooling effect and shade in summer, reducing noise, carbon sequestration and increasing resilience to climate change trees, forests and woodlands also offer aesthetic and amenity value, and can act as landmark features within our settlements and open countryside. They contribute to nature conservation and increase biodiversity, and often have historic and recreational value. They also help to generate a feeling of 'well-being'.

11.520 The planting of trees, woodlands and forests can assist in tackling issues around flood risk, providing a soft engineering solution which can be undertaken in isolation or in conjunction with hard infrastructure (man-made structures).

11.521 Trees are recognised as a reducer of flood risk from the top to bottom. The leaves reduce flooding in two ways: evaporation; and, slow the flow rate of water into rivers. Whereas the roots assists in draining water reducing the amount reaching the river, whilst also holding soil in place reducing soil entering the river and affecting its flow. Proposals will be expected to demonstrate how they will contribute to flood risk alleviation.

11.522 The Plan supports the planting of a type, scale, design, age composition and species mix that is appropriate to the locality. Proposals will be required to consider the impact on the landscape or nature conservation value of an area or its built historic heritage. Where an impact is adverse the proposal will not be supported.


Strategic Policy – SP16: Sustainable Distribution – Settlement Framework

The provision of growth and development will be directed to sustainable locations in accordance with the following

spatial framework.

Cluster 1

Cluster 2

Cluster 3

Cluster 4

Cluster 5

Cluster 6

Tier 1 – Principal Centre

Carmarthen

  • Llanelli
  • Ammanford/

Crosshands

Tier 2 – Service Centre

  • Pontyates /

Meinciau /

Ponthenri

  • Ferryside
  • Kidwelly
  • Burry Port
  • Pembrey
  • Hendy / Fforest
  • Llangennech
  • Trimsaran/
  • Carway
  • Brynamman
  • Glanamman /

Garnant

  • Pontyberem /

Bancffosfelen

  • Newcastle Emlyn
  • Llanybydder
  • Pencader
  • Llandovery
  • Llandeilo / Rhosmaen / Ffairfach
  • Llangadog
  • St Clears/ Pwll Trap
  • Whitland
  • Laugharne

Tier 3 – Sustainable Villages

  • Cynwyl Elfed
  • Llanybri
  • Llansteffan
  • Bronwydd
  • Cwmffrwd
  • Llangyndeyrn
  • Brechfa
  • Llangain
  • Idole / Pentrepoeth
  • Peniel
  • Alltwalis
  • Llanpumsaint
  • Llandyfaelog
  • Rhydargaeau
  • Llanarthne
  • Capel Dewi
  • Nantgaredig
  • Pontargothi
  • Llanddarog
  • Porthyrhyd
  • Cwmduad
  • Mynyddygarreg
  • Five Roads / Horeb
  • Llansaint / Broadway
  • Carmel
  • Cwmgwili
  • Foelgastell
  • Ystradowen
  • Llannon
  • Llanedi
  • Drefach / Felindre
  • Waungilwen
  • Llangeler
  • Pentrecwrt
  • Saron/Rhos
  • Llanllwni
  • Cwmann
  • Capel Iwan
  • Llanfihangel ar arth
  • Trelech
  • Pontyweli
  • Cenarth
  • New Inn
  • Caio
  • Ffarmers
  • Llansawel
  • Talley
  • Cwrt Henri
  • Llanfynydd
  • Llanwrda
  • Cwmifor
  • Salem
  • Abergorlech
  • Llanboidy
  • Glandy Cross
  • Efailwen
  • Llangynin
  • Meidrim
  • Bancyfelin
  • Llangynog
  • Pendine
  • Llanddowror
  • Llanmiloe

Cluster 1

Cluster 2

Cluster 3

Cluster 4

Cluster 5

Cluster 6

Tier 4 – Rural Villages

(No development limits)

  • Hermon
  • Abernant
  • Blaenycoed
  • Bancycapel
  • Nantycaws
  • Croesyceiliog
  • Crwbin
  • Felingwm Uchaf
  • Felingwm Isaf
  • Llanegwad
  • Pontantwn
  • Nebo
  • Talog
  • Penybont
  • Whitemill
  • Pont-newydd
  • Pontarsais
  • Cynheidre
  • Four Roads
  • Penymynydd
  • Capel Seion
  • Derwydd
  • Heol Ddu
  • Maesybont
  • Milo
  • Pantllyn
  • Pentregwenlais
  • Temple Bar
  • Cefnbrynbrain
  • Rhosamman
  • Drefach (Llandyfan)
  • Stag and Pheasant
  • Mynyddcerrig
  • Penboyr
  • Drefelin
  • Cwmpengraig
  • Cwmhiraeth
  • Pentrecagal
  • Gwyddgrug
  • Dolgran
  • Bancyffordd
  • Bryn Iwan
  • Pencarreg
  • Ffaldybrenin
  • Crugybar
  • Cwm-du
  • Ashfield Row
  • Felindre (Llangadog)
  • Cynghordy
  • Golden Grove
  • Broad Oak
  • Trapp
  • Manordeilo
  • Penybanc
  • Felindre, (Dryslwyn)
  • Dryslwyn
  • Rhydcymerau
  • Waunystrad Meurig
  • Bethlehem
  • Capel Isaac
  • Llangathen
  • Llansadwrn
  • Rhandirmwyn
  • Porthyrhyd
  • Pumsaint
  • Cilycwm
  • Cwmfelin Mynach
  • Cwmbach
  • Blaenwaun
  • Llanglydwen
  • Cwmfelin Boeth
  • Cross Inn
  • Llansadurnen
  • Broadway
  • Red Roses
  • Llanfallteg

Table 11: Settlement hierarchy


11.523 The Plan seeks to distribute growth and development spatially across the County, with settlements allocated to one of 6 clusters within the hierarchy. The cluster based approach is flexible in apportioning new growth and avoids any assumption that every settlement in every tier must contribute towards growth. Regard has also been given to cross boundary settlements, and how they impact on the role and function of Carmarthenshire's border settlements. These include: Pontarddulais, Lampeter, Adpar, Narberth and Llandysul. Reference is made to the evidence base in relation to housing distribution.

11.524 Whilst the majority of development will be directed to the top tiers of the settlement hierarchy, the diversity of the County is recognised and regard will be given to housing in rural areas, and the value such areas play within the County. Within rural villages (Tier 4) and non-defined settlements, new housing development will be limited to small scale opportunities. Reference is made to Policy HOM3 and HOM4 of this Plan.

11.525 Whilst the above refers specifically to residential growth, the settlement framework will, in conjunction with specific policies, also guide the consideration of appropriate sustainable locations - with access to services and facilities - and scale of other developments (including employment).

11.526 The following sets out an indicative outline on the nature of development likely by tier including their scale and type:

Principal Centres

Strategic Sites

Large and small scale Employment Areas

Housing Allocations

Small housing sites (under 5 homes);

Affordable Housing Provision on sites of 5 or more units

Windfall housing opportunities

Service Centres:

Small Scale Employment Areas

Housing Allocations

Affordable Housing Provision on sites of 5 or more units

Small housing sites (under 5 homes);

Windfall housing opportunities

Sustainable Villages:

Housing Allocations

Affordable housing on sites of 5 or more units

Small housing sites (under 5 homes);

Windfall housing opportunities

Small Scale Rural Exceptions Schemes for Affordable Housing adjoining settlement boundaries

Rural Villages (No Development Limits):

Small sites – housing through infill or logical extensions/rounding off.

Small Scale Rural Exceptions Schemes for Affordable Housing

Non Defined Rural Settlements:

Local needs affordable housing and Small Scale Rural Exceptions Schemes for Affordable Housing.

SD1: Development Limits

Development Limits are defined for those settlements identified as Principal Centres, Service Centres and Sustainable Villages within Strategic Policy SP16.

Proposals within defined Development Limits will be permitted, subject to policies and proposals of this Plan, national policies and other material planning considerations.

11.527 In preparing this Plan, development limits have been defined across all settlements within Tiers 1, 2 and 3 in order to:

  • Prevent inappropriate development in the countryside and provide certainty and clarity as to where exceptions proposals (adjacent to limits) may be considered appropriate;
  • Prevent coalescence of settlements (or separate parts of the same settlement), ribbon development or a fragmented development.
  • Identify those areas within which development proposals would be permitted (see above); and,
  • Promote effective and appropriate use of land concentrating growth within defined settlements.

11.528 Not all land on a Proposals Map and Inset Maps is identified for a particular development, or the subject of a specific policy. Significant areas of land can appear as un-annotated land in the Plan. Proposals for development will be considered on their individual merits against the provisions of this LDP, and other material considerations.


Strategic Policy – SP 17: Transport and Accessibility

Sustainable and deliverable development requires an integrated, accessible, reliable, efficient, safe and sustainable transport network to underpin delivery. The Plan therefore contributes to the delivery of a sustainable transport system and associated infrastructure through:

  1. Reducing the need to travel, particularly by private motor car;
  2. Addressing social inclusion through increased accessibility to employment, services and facilities;
  3. Supporting and, where applicable, enhancing alternatives to the motor car, such as public transport (including park and ride facilities and encouraging the adoption of travel plans) and active travel through cycling and walking;
  4. Re-enforcing the function and role of settlements in accordance with the settlement framework;
  5. Promoting the efficient use of the transport network;
  6. Enhancing accessibility to places of employment, homes, services, facilities and other significant trip generating proposals at locations with access to appropriate transport infrastructure;
  7. The incorporation of design and access solutions within developments to promote accessibility;
  8. Providing walking and cycling routes, linking in with active travel and green infrastructure networks;
  9. Providing for new technological solutions through Ultra Low Emission Vehicles Charging Points in new developments; and,
  10. Adopting a sustainable approach to the design, function and layout of new development, including providing appropriate levels of parking.

11.529 The LDP and the Policy recognises the role that movement, connectivity, legibility and their associated transport links play, particularly across a county as diverse as Carmarthenshire. The LDP strategy reflects and promotes the principles of sustainability and accessibility to essential services and facilities with the aim of achieving viable, self-supporting settlements and sustainable communities thus increasing social inclusion, cohesion and economic diversity and vibrancy. The settlement framework reflects the sustainability of settlements and the sustainable transport hierarchy by locating the majority of development where services, jobs, shopping and leisure facilities are located, but also recognising the diversity of the County and its rural communities including the rural areas. The County and its transport network is diverse, with the network connecting people and services, including the highway, public transport, pedestrian and cycle routes and PROWs (including bridleways).

11.530 In achieving the above, the strategy has regard to the highway and rail network along with accessibility to public transport and the potential for growth of settlements reflecting their levels of accessibility. In urban settlements the nature of their connectivity and frequency of transport is reflected through the settlement hierarchy. However, even within some of these settlements there is an inconsistency in the availability of an active travel network. Across the more rural areas and their communities, a lack of public transport access and the links afforded through active travel networks is inevitably more fragmented consequently this needs to be balanced against a development's potential contribution towards sustaining that community and the rural economy of the area.

11.531 The Plan will seek to guide development in the rural parts of the County to within and adjoining defined settlements, as opposed to sporadic countryside locations except where in accordance with the policies of this plan.

11.532 The Policy highlights the need for improvements to, and expansion of, Active Travel and public transport as part of proposals for development. This reflects the move away from the use of the private motor car. The Policy however also seeks to reflect the potential in terms of reducing harmful emissions through the introduction of Ultra Low Emission Vehicle Charging points in new development (reference should be made to Policy: CCH2).

11.533 This seeks in part to respond to the diversity of the County, accessibility and the aim of reducing the need to travel (and reducing CO2 emissions) and this remains a challenge for a large part of Carmarthenshire. This challenge is particularly evident when addressing the need to sustain rural areas, and to ensure that their communities do not suffer social exclusion. This must also relate to a realistic acceptance that the motor car remains an important means of travel in such areas.

11.534 Minimising travel may also be possible through an integrated transport strategy and the development of self-sustaining communities (including the availability of services and facilities) and the availability of alternatives through appropriate initiatives such as 'Bwcabus'. It is recognised that developing public transport as a viable and credible alternative to the use of the private car will assist in the reduction of congestion on key transport corridors. It is however also recognised that as technology progresses the potential impact or otherwise of the private car itself will change.

11.535 The LDP seeks to positively promote solutions which encourage access to technological changes, including electric charging points, in promoting a reduction in harmful emissions and enhancing social inclusion and accessibility.

11.536 Where a scheme is identified as requiring further feasibility, design and preparation it is not identified within the LDP. This reflects the potential for an absence of clear indications of delivery.

11.537 The role of the County as a centre for cycling in Wales is recognised and the Council's Cycling Strategy will be considered and where appropriate reflected as the LDP progresses. In this respect, the role of the cycling network as an economic driver and leisure and tourism asset is recognised. Similarly, its contribution to the promotion of accessibility and benefits to our communities are also recognised, as is the contribution ofthe public footpath network and bridleways.

11.538 The following table identifies the primary road network, including trunk roads, and the core network. These routes are identified on the constraints map as corridors for movement.

Primary and Core Road Networks

Primary Road Network (corresponds to the identified Strategic network):

M4

A484

A40 (T)

A48

A476

B4310

A4138

A477 (T)

B4335

A474

A4878

B4336

A483 (T)

A4069

B4459

A48 (T)

A482

B4039

A486

A485

B4317

Core Road Network (corresponds to the identified Highway network):

A4066

B4304

B4556

A4068

B4306

B4301

B4299

B4300

B4303

B4333

B4328

B4314

B4310

B4312

B4297

B4337

B4308

B4302

B4368

TRA1: Transport and Highways Infrastructural Improvements

Transport routes, improvements and associated infrastructural facilities which deliver the objectives and priorities of the Joint Transport Plan for South West Wales (2015 – 2020) will be supported.

The improvements to the highway infrastructure as part of the Cross Hands Economic Link Road will be safeguarded with the route identified on the proposals map.

Proposals which maintain and enhance an integrated sustainable transport network will also be supported where they accord with the policies and provisions of this Plan. Development proposals which do not prejudice the efficient implementation of any identified improvement or scheme will be permitted.

11.539 The Regional Transport Plan identifies the Cross Hands Economic Link Road as a Transformational connectivity project for the Swansea Bay City Region.

11.540 Significant progress has been made in the delivery of the Cross Hands Economic Link Road (ELR) with Phase 1 opening as part of facilitating the Cross Hands East Strategic Employment Site. A further phase between Llandeilo Road and Penygroes is under construction and nearing completion. The final phase between Black Lion Road and Penygroes has planning permission and provides an opportunity to facilitate further development of the former Emlyn Brickworks site in Penygroes. This scheme includes associated earthworks, drainage, lighting, signing etc. together with accommodation works and associated environmental mitigation works.

11.541 The ELR will ease congestion at the A48 Cross Hands Roundabout which is part of the Trans European Network (TENS) as well as improve safety at the ''6 ways'' junction in Gorslas. The scheme will provide a key link in the highway network to Llandeilo as part of the Swansea to Manchester trunk road.

11.542 The new link road from A40 dual carriageway to College Road near Parc Dewi Sant and Trinity St. David's University was opened in March 2019. This allowed access to education and employment sites as well as delivering infrastructure for future housing growth and facilitating the Yr Egin (S4C) development (see Policy SP5: Strategic Sites).

11.543 Ammanford Distributor Road Phase 2 is identified as part of a long term proposal to assist in economic regeneration of the wider Ammanford and Amman Valley areas. Whilst the LDP does not safeguard or identify this route, it recognises its status within the Joint Transport Plan and the Council will monitor any progress towards its delivery. The absence of clear indications of delivery and a defined alignment dictate that it is not identified within the Policy or on the proposal map.

11.544 Further schemes identified within the Regional Transport Plan for Carmarthenshire 2015 – 2020 include those schemes listed for 2020 – 2030 and will be reviewed in light of progress updates emanating from the Joint Transport Plan and future strategies:

  • Ammanford Economic Regeneration Infrastructure (Wind St/Tirydail) – Junction improvements (completed 2019)
  • Carmarthenshire Strategic Transport Corridors and Interchanges - ongoing improvements to main Bus Corridors.
  • Carmarthenshire Walking and Cycling Linkages - Continued development of a comprehensive network of Walking & Cycling Linkages such as the Amman Valley Cycleway, Carmarthenshire employment routes and the National Cycle Network to improve access to employment, education and other services as well encouraging tourism and healthy lifestyles.
  • A4138 Access into Llanelli incorporating Llanelli/M4 Park and ride/share – Subject to further design and implementation of preferred options from 2019/20.
  • Towy Valley Transport Corridor (Towy Valley Cycleway) - Cycleway with links to key attractions including the market towns of Carmarthen and Llandeilo with a phased approach to implementation with the initial phase under construction.
  • Llanelli Integrated Transport Interchange – In the Station Road/Copperworks Road areas, this represents a key focal point for transport interchange between a number of modes including the Town's railway station, key commercial bus routes and a park and ride (rail) facility.
  • Sustainable Travel Centres - May include EV charging infrastructure, targeted home zones, interchange improvements, cycle racks and employment centred sustainable travel routes
  • Access to Pembrey Country Park - Replace/upgrade the existing single lane road over the Rail Bridge which currently serves Pembrey County Park (PCP).

TRA2: Active Travel

Proposals which enhance walking and cycling access by incorporating the following within the site, and/or making financial contributions towards the delivery of off-site provision, will be supported:

  1. Permeable, legible, direct, convenient, attractive and safe walking and cycling routes connecting the development to: surrounding settlements; public transport nodes; community facilities; commercial and employment areas; tourism facilities; and, leisure opportunities;
  2. Improvements, connections, and/or extensions to: footpath network and existing PROWs (including bridleways); cycle network and routes; Safe Routes to School; and, routes forming part of the Green Infrastructure network; and
  3. Facilities that encourage the uptake of walking and cycling, including: appropriate signage; secure and convenient cycle parking; and changing and associated facilities.

Proposals which have a significant adverse impact on PROW or existing routes identified through the Active Travel (Wales) Act 2013 will be expected to contribute to the delivery the Council's Active Travel Plan.

11.545 Development proposals must seek to maximise accessibility by walking, cycling and public transport, by prioritising the provision of appropriate on-site infrastructure and, where necessary, mitigating transport impacts through the provision of off-site measures, such as the development of active travel routes, bus priority infrastructure and financial support for public transport services[46].

11.546 The Plan seeks to promote accessibility to alternative means of transport to help reduce car use, and to support the Council in fulfilling its legal duty under the Active Travel (Wales) Act 2013 to develop, improve and maintain local walking and cycling networks. Proposals will be encouraged to use Standards of good practice including the Active Travel Act Design Standards and other relevant guidance to ensure the design principles reflect and deliver Active Travel. Regard should also be had to the Council's Highways Design Guide.

11.547 In utilising this policy regard should be had to the provisions of the LDP on placemaking and Green Infrastructure. In this respect, the Plan emphasises a commitment to quality environments and design, with active travel and walking and cycling as important components.

11.548 Proposals within rural areas should reflect the national sustainable placemaking outcomes and, where possible, offer good active travel connections to the centres of settlements to reduce the need to travel by car for local journeys[47].

TRA3: Gwili Railway

Proposals will be permitted where they do not prejudice the following in relation to the Gwili Railway:

  1. The extension of the Gwili Railway northwards to Llanpumsaint;
  2. The provision of a new station at Glangwili, Carmarthen.

11.549 Proposals for the Gwili Railway will be considered in light of their effect on local traffic conditions, on the quality of the environment and infrastructural requirements.

11.550 The Gwili Railway is an important tourist attraction and the Council will support the long-term proposals to extend the line northwards ultimately to Llanpumsaint and the provision of a new station as identified within the Policy.

11.551 The safeguarded areas and routes are shown on the Proposals Map.

TRA4: Redundant Rail Corridors

Proposals for development which do not prejudice the re-use of redundant rail corridors for potential future recreational and rail development purposes will be supported.

11.552 The Plan area has a number of former railway lines which offer considerable benefit for recreational activities including cycle routes, footpaths and bridleways. Consideration also needs to be given to the potential future re-use of rail routes when considering proposals, which may impact upon the continuity and availability of the route.

TRA5: Highways and Access Standards in Development

Proposals for development will be permitted where they:

  1. Incorporate the necessary access standards reflecting the road classification and conditions;
  2. Include appropriate visibility splays and design features necessary to ensure highway safety and that the ease of movement is maintained, and enhanced where required;
  3. Do not generate unacceptable levels of traffic which has a detrimental impact on the surrounding road network, highway safety, or would cause significant harm to the amenity of residents.
  4. Will not result in offsite congestion in terms of parking or service provision.

11.553 Where a development proposal is likely to raise issues in respect of highway capacity of the network, contributions may be required to facilitate appropriate works as part of the granting of any permission.

11.554 In using this policy, reference should also be made to Policy PSD1: Sustainable and High Quality Design and to the content of the Highways Design Guide which will be adopted as SPG.


Strategic Policy SP 18: Mineral Resources

The County's identified mineral resources will be sustainably managed by:

  1. Ensuring supply by maintaining an adequate landbank of permitted aggregate reserves (a minimum 10 years for hard crushed rock, and a minimum 7 years for sand and gravel) throughout the Plan period;
  2. Encouraging the efficient and appropriate use of high quality minerals and maximising the potential for the re-use and recycling of suitable minerals as an alternative to primary won aggregates;
  3. Safeguarding areas underlain by minerals of economic importance where they could be worked in the future to ensure that such resources are not unnecessarily sterilised by other forms of development;
  4. The use of buffer zones to reduce the conflict between mineral development and sensitive development;
  5. Securing appropriate restoration which can deliver specific environmental and community benefits.

11.555 The LDP will seek to ensure that the County provides mineral resources to meet society's needs and that such resources, are safeguarded from sterilisation. In doing so, the LDP seeks to ensure that a proper balance is struck between this fundamental requirement, the need to ensure a prudent use of these finite resources, and the protection of existing amenity and the environment.

11.556 Carmarthenshire has a wide variety of mineral resources as a result of its complex geology. The main feature in the south of the County is the broad sweep of the Coal Measures outcrop, fringed to the north by Carboniferous Limestone. Limestone quarrying is the largest of the extractive industries in the County. The northern parts of the County are underlain by older rocks of Ordovician and Silurian age, mainly sandstones, shales and slates. The economic significance of these is variable.

11.557 The South Wales Regional Technical Statement (RTS) 2014 sets out the contribution that each constituent local authority should make towards meeting the regional demand for aggregates (both hard crushed rock, and sand and gravel). The County's landbank figures for crushed rock is notably in excess of the minimum requirements set out in Minerals Technical Advice Note (MTAN) 1: Aggregates, and consequently there is no requirement to allocate new sites for mineral development. The position regarding the landbank for sand and gravel is different as the apportionments and allocations for land-based sand and gravel within Carmarthenshire have been combined with Pembrokeshire, Pembrokeshire Coast National Park and Ceredigion. The RTS states there is an under provision of 2.94 million tonnes of sand and gravel reserves within the region of Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire (including the National Park) to cover the period up to 2033 and that these authorities should work collaboratively to address the shortfall and identify specific sites.

11.558 Both Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire County Councils have sought to address the shortfall in sand and gravel reserves later in the Revised Plan period and are working together to achieve this through the potential allocation of a site(s).

11.559 There is a clear direction from the Welsh Government to avoid the continued extraction and consumption of fossil fuels. Therefore, the Authority does not propose to safeguard coal resources. The Council is required to notify the Welsh Government in the event of proposals for coal or petroleum operations that it is not minded to refuse.

MR1: Mineral Proposals

Proposals for mineral extraction will be permitted where there is a proven national, regional or local need for the mineral which cannot be met from existing sources or from secondary or recycled material, and where they would not result in any significant adverse impacts upon public health, the environment, local amenity and the local transport network. Applications for minerals proposals will be assessed against the following criteria:

  1. Suitable access and transport routes have been identified and the potential for minerals to be transported by means other than road has been adequately assessed;
  2. Noise is demonstrated to be within acceptable levels;
  3. The best practicable means are identified to control dust, smoke, fumes and to ensure that operations do not cause a deterioration in local air quality or an unacceptable impact on public health;
  4. Blasting is controlled within acceptable levels;
  5. Potential impacts on groundwater resources, surface water resources and water supplies are identified and demonstrated to be within acceptable levels;
  6. There are no unacceptable adverse impacts upon sites of nature conservation importance, and adverse impacts upon sites of historic, cultural and landscape importance are identified and demonstrated to be minimal;
  7. Effective mitigation measures proposed to minimise any potential effects from subsidence or land instability have been identified and demonstrated to the Council's satisfaction;
  8. Adverse impact on landscape character and visual amenity is not significant;
  9. Opportunities for the re-use and/or recycling of mineral waste are maximised;
  10. Satisfactory proposals have been submitted for restoration, landscaping, after use, and after care of the site.

11.560 The purpose of the policy is to maintain a balance between meeting national demand for minerals and minimising the potential adverse effects that could result from such operations. Minerals extraction can have positive effects on local areas and communities by providing a source of employment and contributing to the local economy, but at the same time measures have to be put in place to protect local health and amenity and the environment from any negative effects that may result. Particular consideration should be given to the potential for impacts to groundwater and water resources and also to public health, the environment (including landscape/townscape and historic designations), local amenity, the local transport network and other environmental parameters.

11.561 It is essential to plan mineral operations which are environmentally acceptable from the outset. The use of planning controls, such as conditions, legal obligations, and monitoring and enforcement can ensure effective control of operations at mineral sites. The controls should be used where they are necessary and relevant to the individual circumstances under consideration. Acceptable levels of impact will vary at different mineral sites and will be dependent upon a number of factors. It will be up to the Authority to determine these in respect of each individual planning application.

MR2: Mineral Buffer Zones

Provision has been made for Buffer Zones around all sites with extant planning permission for mineral working.

New sensitive non-mineral development will not normally be permitted within the identified buffer zones. All buffer zones have been identified on the proposals map.

11.562 Buffer zones are used to provide areas of protection around permitted mineral workings where new development which would be sensitive to adverse impact, including residential areas, hospitals, schools, should be resisted. The identification of buffer zones will ensure that there is clear guidance on the proximity of mineral operations to sensitive land uses, and that the potential impact of mineral workings is recognised and planned for in the area around the mineral operations.

11.563 The buffer zone distances of 200m (minimum) around hard rock quarries and 100m (minimum) around sand and gravel extraction sites are set out in MTAN1: Aggregates,[48] and 500m buffer zones around coal working sites is set out MTAN2: Coal.[49] Exceptions to these distances will be considered in accordance with the provisions set out in MTANs 1 & 2.

MR3: Mineral Safeguarding

Planning permission will not be granted for development proposals where they would permanently sterilise resources of aggregate identified within the mineral safeguarding areas (areas of search) on the proposals map unless:

  1. The applicant can demonstrate that the extraction of the mineral is impracticable, uneconomic or environmentally unacceptable (including compromising amenity and social considerations); or
  2. The mineral resource has already been extracted; or
  3. The mineral can be extracted satisfactorily prior to the development taking place; or
  4. The development is of a temporary nature and can be completed and the site restored within the timescale that the mineral is likely to be needed; or,
  5. The nature and location of the development would have no significant impact on the potential working of the resource.

11.564 PPW stresses the importance of safeguarding mineral resources that meet society's needs now and in the future. This however, does not necessarily indicate a presumption in favour of working the mineral deposits, merely that the location of the mineral is known. The safeguarded areas shown on the Proposals Map relate to the British Geological Survey (BGS) Aggregate Safeguarding Map for South West Wales.

11.565 Development on safeguarded areas may only proceed if the developer can satisfy any of the above criteria. When viewed with other relevant policies of the plan (particularly MPP1), mineral extraction will not be appropriate within or adjacent to settlement development limits. However, in cases where other forms of development are proposed in such areas (and a mineral resource worthy of safeguarding has been identified), prior extraction of the resource should be considered as part of the application whilst ensuring that any operation does not have any unacceptable adverse impacts upon the environment, human health and local amenity.

11.566 With regard to aggregates (hard rock, and sand and gravel) identified and safeguarded on the proposals map, the extraction of mineral resources will generally not be acceptable within 200 metres of identified settlements in the LDP (for hard rock) and within 100 metres (for sand and gravel).

11.567 At present there are no marine wharves within the County. Potential future proposals, where acceptable, will be protected to safeguard marine sand and gravel supply route(s) into the area. Llanelli Sands' operational site in Burry Port (together with the associated 'marine landing site') will be identified on the Proposals map, and within Appendix 4 of extant mineral sites and safeguarded accordingly.


Strategic Policy – SP 19: Sustainable Waste Management

Provision will be made to facilitate the sustainable management of waste through:

  1. The allocation of adequate, appropriate land to provide for an integrated network of waste management facilities;
  2. Supporting proposals for waste management which involve the management of waste in accordance with the ranking set out within in the waste hierarchy;
  3. Supporting proposals which have regard to the nearest appropriate installation concept and principles of proximity and self-sufficiency[50];
  4. Supporting proposals for new in-building waste management facilities at existing and allocated industrial sites (B2 use) which are identified as suitable for waste management facilities;
  5. Acknowledging that certain types of waste facility may need to be located outside the development limits of settlements;
  6. Ensuring that provision is made for the sustainable management of waste in all new development, including securing opportunities to minimise the production of waste.

Development proposals must ensure that:

  1. There are no significant, adverse effects upon public health, the environment, local amenity and the local transport network;
  2. The proposal is compatible with any neighbouring uses or activities.

The co-location of waste management facilities to enable the development of heat networks will be supported, subject to the above criteria; and

Waste related proposals must be supported by an appropriate Waste Planning Assessment.

11.568 Planning issues which must be taken into account when preparing applications for waste developments are set out within Annex C of Technical Advice Note (TAN) 21 Waste (2014). Applications will need to demonstrate how the proposal will contribute towards meeting the objectives in the National Waste Strategy Towards Zero Waste and the Collections, Infrastructure and Markets Sector Plan (CIMSP). A Waste Planning Assessment (WPA) should be submitted with all applications for a waste facility classified as a disposal, recovery or recycling facility. The WPA should be appropriate and proportionate to the nature, size and scale of the development proposed. Further advice is contained within Annex B of TAN 21 Waste.

11.569 Applicants will need to demonstrate how the waste hierarchy has been addressed in their development proposal. Departure from the waste hierarchy will need to be justified through the use of Life Cycle Assessment. This will need to be documented as part of the WPA submitted by the applicant.

11.570 Although it is difficult to accurately predict the future needs for residual mixed waste treatment, recovery and for the disposal of waste, the CIMSP sets out the continued need for increased recovery of residual mixed waste which are incapable of being recycled. Therefore, a need exists to develop more residual waste treatment and recovery facilities and to ensure that sufficient disposal capacity is maintained at a level appropriate to support the overall aims of Towards Zero Waste. Reference is made to the annual Waste Planning Monitoring Reports (WPMRs) for the South West Wales region (as identified in TAN 21) which provide information and recommendations on cross border working, particularly in respect of how the region's residual waste is being managed and whether there is sufficient remaining landfill capacity.

11.571 General employment sites (B2 uses) may be suitable for many of the future 'in-building' waste facilities. These facilities would cater for industrial and commercial waste as well as local authority collected waste. Being mindful of the need to divert waste away from landfill, the opportunities offered by in-building energy from waste facilities to harness energy for heat and/or power from residual municipal waste will be permitted provided that they are compatible with neighbouring uses and meet the criteria set out above. Proposals that incorporate combined heat and power that could contribute toward district heating schemes for large developments will be encouraged. Those sites with the potential to accommodate in-building waste facilities are listed in Policy: SP6. This is in addition to the existing waste management facilities within the County which are listed in Appendix 8. Many of these, such as the Nantycaws waste management site, are well established and are likely to continue to play a role within the Plan period.

11.572 Proposals involving the recycling and re-use of inert construction and demolition wastes as well as mineral and industrial wastes, will be encouraged. Existing active mineral sites (identified on the LDP Proposals Maps, and listed in Appendix 4), or appropriate construction sites will be the preferred locations. B2 employment land allocations might also be options, for example where in-building waste transfer stations or materials recovery facilities capable of dealing with such waste can operate. Compatibility with existing employment uses will be a critical factor when assessing proposals for recycling inert wastes on B2 sites.

11.573 B2 employment sites are not suitable locations for certain types of 'open-air' waste operations, particularly landfill or open-windrow composting. Other types of waste facilities, such as civic amenity (CA) sites, are also sometimes more suited to locations away from built up areas. Proposals for open-windrow composting may be considered suitable as part of farm diversification schemes.

WM1 Sustainable Waste Management and New Development

Development proposals must ensure that provision is made for the sustainable management of waste in all new development, including storage, recycling and by securing opportunities to minimise the production of waste.

11.574 New developments have the opportunity to make a contribution towards meeting the targets set out within the National Waste Strategy for Wales Towards Zero Waste (TZW) by incorporating adequate facilities and space for the collection, composting and recycling of waste materials into their design. Applying such an approach will also help to encourage participation in recycling at home, at work and public spaces.

11.575 There are a number of key issues that will need to be addressed in connection with waste management that apply to all types of development:

  • Separation of waste for recycling: incorporating recycling facilities will help to ensure that waste diversion is easy and convenient to implement;
  • Access: it is important to design easy and convenient access for both users of waste facilities and those who collect waste. This will also help in promoting recycling and make economic provision of waste services more achievable;
  • Pollution: It is essential that any design and layout considers the potential impact of these facilities on neighbouring properties, in terms of potential odours, noise and the attraction of vermin;
  • Safety: Security must be addressed at the design stage to ensure any negative impact on human health is minimised;
  • Visual impact: it is important to minimise the visual impact of waste and recycling bins and to ensure that they do not detract from the amenity and landscape quality of the area.

11.576 The Council is keen to work with developers to see innovative methods of waste management (including on-site treatment where practicable) incorporated into new residential and other developments.

11.577 Developers should ensure sufficient space is incorporated within their development for the placement of waste containers at the kerbside on collection days, and that the route between the storage area and collection point is free from steps, kerbs or other obstructions. Road design and layout standards must take account of the Council's access requirements of waste collection vehicles.

11.578 All businesses are required to have adequate separation and storage facilities for waste. The storage area must meet health and safety requirements for access, lighting and ventilation and also be secure to prevent vandalism and fly tipping. It is also recommended that any storage is developed in consultation with the proposed service provider. Commercial premises will also be expected to recycle, therefore multiple bins/storage containers are likely to be required.

WM2: Landfill Proposals

Proposals for new landfill sites will only be permitted where they can accord with the following:

  1. Additional capacity is required within the South West Wales region (evidence must be provided to show where the material will be sourced):
  2. The proposal conforms with the waste hierarchy, the concept of the nearest appropriate installation and self-sufficiency;
  3. There would be no significant adverse impact on:
    1. The natural heritage, cultural and historic environment;
    2. The geology and hydrogeology of the site;
    3. Controlled waters, including water quality and quantity;
    4. The amenities of neighbouring occupiers, including the effects of traffic movement and the generation of noise, dust, fumes and odours;
    5. The local highway network, including access, and highway safety;
    6. Public safety, health and well-being;
    7. The visual amenity of the site and its environs;
    8. Public utilities infrastructure and services; and
    9. Good quality agricultural land (Grades 1, 2 or 3a)

The method of restoration and aftercare, and the proposed after use will need to form part of the landfill proposal and be completed within the lifetime of any permission granted.

11.579 The Welsh Government has a long term aim of eliminating landfilling as far as possible. TZW sets limits on the total amount of residual municipal waste and industrial and commercial waste sent to landfill. However, it is recognised that disposal to landfill will continue in the short to medium term. This is partly due to the way in which waste is collected, the infrastructure capacities currently in place to deal with waste, and the existence of legacy wastes (such as asbestos) and incineration residues, where no safe alternative to ultimate landfill disposal currently exists.

11.580 Each year a Waste Planning Monitoring Report (WPMR) is produced for the South West Wales region which identifies the amount of landfill capacity (voidspace) remaining within the region as a whole. The level (set out within TAN 21 Waste) at which the void in each region is considered sufficient and should be maintained is 5/7 years. Whilst the latest WPMR for the 2018/19 period identifies sufficient capacity, if the situation changes in subsequent years then potential locations for a new landfill site will need to be considered that would serve the requirements of the region.

11.581 The last remaining landfill site in Carmarthenshire, at Nantycaws, has remaining capacity but is not operational at the present time. It is not clear if or when this situation is going to change during the course of the Plan. In terms of the local authority's collected waste, the residual element is presently being disposed of in landfills, and other treatment facilities, outside of the County (both within and outside the South West Wales region).

11.582 Proposals for new landfill sites will be evaluated in the context of the criteria set out above and with regard to detailed planning considerations set out within TAN 21 Waste - Annex C. Proposals will be carefully assessed to ensure landfill sites do not pose a serious risk to public health, the environment and neighbouring uses.

11.583 Where appropriate and feasible, developers may be required to enter into a S106 Agreement to ensure that proposals include measures to generate energy from landfill gas where methane might otherwise escape into the atmosphere. Ensuring that the restoration and aftercare of a completed landfill site (or cell) takes place to a standard agreed by the Council will also be secured via a S106 Agreement. The final landscaping must be completed by the end date of the planning permission.

11.584 An EIA must be submitted for all applications falling within Schedule 1 of the EIA Regulations and, where appropriate, will be requested for any development falling within Schedule 2.

WM3: Agricultural Land – Disposal of Inert Waste

Proposals for the deposit of imported inert waste materials for the improvement of low grade agriculture land will only be permitted where:

  1. It can be demonstrated that the improvement sought is reasonably necessary for the purposes of agriculture within the holding;
  2. The volume of waste to be deposited is the minimum necessary to achieve the improvement sought;
  3. Arrangements are in place for the separation and removal of any non-inert waste received in error;
  4. The extent, thickness and final surface treatment of the deposit is compatible with the surrounding landform.

11.585 The purpose behind the disposal of inert waste by its deposition on farmland and elsewhere has in the past, on many occasions, been to dispose of waste in the cheapest way possible and avoid payment of landfill tax, rather than to improve agricultural land quality or facilitate other necessary development.

11.586 The main purpose of the proposal should clearly be to improve land quality rather than the disposal of waste. In this regard, the quantity of waste to be deposited should be the minimum required to achieve the proposed improvement. Where this is not the case, the Council will consider the proposal under Policy WM1 above.

11.587 Inert waste is generally sourced from construction, demolition and excavation operations and can include materials such a soils, bricks and concrete. The beneficial use of this waste for agricultural land improvement, where this is necessary, can be categorised as a waste recovery operation. Waste recovery can be defined as any operation the principal result of which is waste serving a useful purpose by replacing other materials which would have otherwise been used to fulfil a particular function, or waste being prepared to fulfil that function, in the plant or wider economy.

11.588 The applicant should demonstrate to the Authority's satisfaction that the proposed waste development is a 'recovery operation'. The Authority will determine whether there is a genuine need for the development, or if the activity is in fact for the 'disposal' of waste to land for any other reason. The key consideration for 'recovery operations' is that the development would have occurred in any event even if the waste was not available. If this is not the case then the operation would be classified as disposal.

11.589 The proposal must demonstrate that the quantity of waste to be used is the minimum amount required and any resulting changes to the landform would be sympathetic to the area. The development should respect the nature conservation and amenity interests of the site and surrounding area, including landscape character and visual amenity.


[2] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – paragraph 4..3.42

[3] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10

[4] Edge Analytics – Carmarthenshire Population and Household Forecast Addendum 2019

[5] Technical Advice Note (TAN) 2: Planning and Affordable Housing 2006 – Paragraph 5.2

[6] Carmarthenshire Rural Needs Study 2019

[7] https://www.swanseabaycitydeal.wales/projects/life-science-and-well-being-village/ /

[8] https://www.carmarthenshire.gov.wales/home/business/development-and-investment/delta-lakes/#.XX-L4uaou70

[9] https://www.swanseabaycitydeal.wales/projects/canolfan-s4c-yr-egin/

[10] Employment Sectoral Study (ESS) 2016

[11] (TAN 6 Para 3.1.3)

[12] Carmarthenshire's Wellbeing Objectives 2018-18

[13] Cymraeg 2050 A Million Welsh Speakers, Welsh Government (2017)

[14] Carmarthenshire County Council (2014) Supplementary Planning Guidance Welsh Language

[15] Community Infrastructure Levy Regulations 2010 (as amended); Planning Policy Wales; Welsh Office Circular 13/97 Planning Obligations

[16] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 (paragraph 3.24)

[17] Health Impact Assessments A Practical Guide - Wales HIA Support Unit

[18] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – Paragraph 5.2.2

[19] Housing (Wales) Act 2014

[20] Welsh Government Circular 005/2018: Planning for Gypsy, Traveller and Showpeople Sites

[23] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 - Section 4

[24] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – Paragraph 2.2

[26] Welsh Government Written Statement: Noise and soundscape action plan 2018-2023

[27] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – paragraph 7.23

[28] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – paragraph 6.7.19

[29] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – paragraph 6.8.

[30] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – paragraph 6.7

[31] Planning Policy Wales Edition 10 Paragraphs 6.9.19

[32] TAN6: Planning for Sustainable Rural Communities - https://gweddill.gov.wales/docs/desh/policy/100722tan6en.pdf

[33] TAN6: Planning for Sustainable Rural Communities - Paragraph 4.13.1

[34] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – Paragraph 4.2.39

[36] Technical Advice Note 1: Economic Development – Paragraph 3.2.1

[37] Chief Planning Officer' Letter - Guidance on securing biodiversity enhancements in development proposals 2019.

[38] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – Paragraphs 6.1.18 and 6.1.19. Further information on the consideration of historic parks and gardens in the determination of planning applications can be found in Technical Advice Note 24: The Historic Environment (https://gov.wales/topics/planning/policy/tans/tan-24/?lang=en) and Cadw best-practice guidance: Managing Change to Registered Historic Parks and Gardens in Wales (http://cadw.gov.wales/docs/cadw/publications/ historicenvironment/20170531Managing%20Change%20to%20Registered%20Historic%20Parks%20&%20Gardens%20in%20Wales%20 26922%20EN.pdf).

[39] Further information on the register of historic landscapes and its use in the determination of planning applications can be found in Technical Advice Note 24: The Historic Environment. https://gov.wales/topics/planning/policy/tans/tan-24/?lang=en

[40] Further information on the consideration of archaeological remains through the planning process, including desk-based assessment, field evaluation and the consideration of unforeseen archaeological remains, can be found in Technical Advice Note 24: The Historic Environment. https://gov.wales/topics/planning/policy/tans/tan-24/?lang=en

[41] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – Paragraphs 6.1.30 - 6.1.32.

[[1]] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – Paragraph 6.78

[[2]] Planning Policy Wales: Edition 10 – Paragraph 4.1.11

[[3]] Re-energising Wales: Decarbonising Transport in Wales – Institute of Welsh Affairs (June 2018)

www.iwa.wales/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/IWA_Decarbonising_Transport-1.pdf

[42] As identified within Technical Advice Note 15 (2004) – Development Advice Maps

[43] Planning Policy Wales Edition 10: Paragraph 6.6.25

[44] Planning Policy Wales Edition 10: Paragraph 6.6.26

[45] http://lle.gov.wales/catalogue/item/WWNPFloodplainReconnectionPotentialWales/?lang=en

[46] Planning Policy Wales Edition 10: paragraph 4.110

[47] Planning Policy Wales Edition 10: paragraph 3.35

[48] Minerals Technical Advice Note 1: Aggregates

[49] Minerals Technical Advice Note 2: Coal

[50] Article 16 of the EU Waste Framework Directive, 2008

If you are having trouble using the system, please try our help guide.
back to top back to top